How to report dangerous driving in the uk

The best way to report dangerous driving to the police is to call the non-emergency number on 101. Several police forces also have website forms where you can submit a report online. The Metropolitan Police website has a form for reporting traffic offences around the UK.

Is road rage a crime UK?

United Kingdom. In the UK, road rage can result in criminal penalties for assault or more serious offences against the person. The Public Order Act 1986 can also apply to road rage. Sections 4A and 5 of the 1986 Act prohibit public acts likely to cause harassment, alarm, or distress.

Is it illegal to give the finger while driving UK?

This sort of conduct can lead to a fine of up to £1,000. That's because under the Crime and Disorder Act, both swearing and performing rude gestures, such as sticking your middle finger up whilst driving, are classed as 'disorderly behaviour' .

How do you report someone to DVLA who should not be driving?

 If you are worried about someone else, contact the DVLA with the name and address of the driver, the registration number and date of birth if known. You can do this anonymously. Or write to Drivers Medical Group, DVLA, Swansea SA99 1TU.

Can you report road rage?

When road rage poses a danger to you or other drivers, call 911 or dial 411 and ask to be connected to the local police department dispatch. If an angry driver follows you or directly threatens you, it is appropriate to report the incident.

What happens if someone reported your license plate for reckless driving?

No. Accusations require proof. People can call until they're blue in the face and report you for driving 200 mph in full afterburner on a residential street and nothing is going to happen. Just don't drive crazily in front of law enforcement or get in an accident and you'll be fine.

Can I submit dashcam footage to police?

DASH cam owners can now send footage straight to the police if they have a run-in with a dangerous driver. Dash cam manufacturer, Nextbase, has launched its National Dash Cam Safety Portal, where all road users can easily send video of dodgy behaviour to the relevant police forces via a single online hub.

Does reporting reckless driving do anything?

If you see someone driving recklessly–whether it be from texting, drunk or drowsy driving, being overly aggressive, or otherwise careless driving–report it by calling 911. But only call if you feel it's a dangerous situation. Remember, the 911 system is intended to render urgent assistance in true emergencies.

How do you call someone for reckless driving?

If you see someone driving recklessly–whether it be from texting, drunk or drowsy driving, being overly aggressive, or otherwise careless driving–report it by calling 911. But only call if you feel it's a dangerous situation.

Can someone call the cops on you for speeding?

Short answer, no. They can file a complaint for reckless driving, but without an officer observing your driving, that would be a hard charge to pursue in court.

Can drivers report other drivers?

"We get situations where people want to report another driver and, quite simply, we do an investigation," says Calgary Police Traffic Sgt. If you're tailgating in Alberta, you could be charged with following too closely under section 18 of the Use of Highway and Rules of the Road Regulations of the Traffic Safety Act.

How do I report a crime UK?

Call 999 if you or someone else is in immediate danger, or if the crime is in progress. Call 101 to contact the police if the crime is not an emergency. You can also contact Crimestoppers to report a crime anonymously. They will pass the information about the crime to the police.

How do I report someone on the phone while driving?

How to report someone using a phone while driving. Members of the public can report repeat offenders anonymously by calling Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111 or the police's non-emergency number 101.

How do I complain about a speeding car UK?

You can also contact the police on their non-emergency number 101 or Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

What should you do if you see someone texting and driving?

You can report the untaxed vehicle online anonymously. You will need to state the vehicle registration number, make, model ,colour and the full address where it is parked. You can report by post by sending the details above to Enforcement Section, W070/D12, DVLA, Longview Road, Swansea, SA7 0XZ.

How do I report speeding on my street?

How's My Driving? was the first road safety risk scheme of its kind introduced into the UK and since 1995 we have successfully raised the profile of road safety, whilst helping drivers to become more aware of their driving style. A proportion of our profits are reinvested back into national road safety projects.

How do I report dangerous driving in Scotland?

Can you report bad drivers to the police? "If you witness any dangerous driving on the roads, please call Police Scotland on the non emergency number 101 when it is safe to do so." From the Police Scotland Facebook page.

Is road rage a criminal offense in California?

California Road Rage Crimes. Road Rage can lead to a number of criminal offenses, both misdemeanors and felonies, which can result in a county jail or state prison sentence, hefty fines, and worst of all a permanent criminal record. ADW can be charged as either a misdemeanor or felony.

How to report a driver or their company to the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) if you think they’re breaking safety rules.

Applies to England, Scotland and Wales

You can report a lorry, bus or coach driver or the company running the vehicles (a ‘vehicle operator’) to DVSA if you think they’re breaking safety rules or conditions of their driving or operator licence.

This includes things like:

  • breaking drivers’ hours rules
  • overloading vehicles
  • using vehicles that are not safe to drive (unroadworthy)
  • using emission cheat devices
  • carrying dangerous or hazardous goods without permission
  • driving an excessively smoky lorry or bus

There’s a different process to report other crime, such as suspected drink-driving, speeding and driving while disqualified.

Report the driver or company

You need to give as much information as possible about:

  • who is involved – for example, the driver or company name, or the vehicle registration number (number plate)
  • what the driver or company is doing
  • where they’re doing it
  • when they’re doing it

DVSA intelligence unit
[email protected]
Telephone: 0800 030 4103
Monday to Friday, 7:30am to 6pm
Find out about call charges

Intelligence Unit
DVSA
The Ellipse
Padley Road
Swansea
SA1 8AN

Before you make your report

You can make a report anonymously – you do not have to give your name or contact details unless you want to.

Reporting something anonymously

If you call or write anonymously:

  • you will never be asked for your name or to provide contact details
  • your call will not be traced
  • you will not have to make a statement or be called as a witness
  • you will not have to appear in court

Depending on the incident you’re reporting, it might be possible for the driver or company to work out that you reported it – even if you report it anonymously.

Example You report a bus driver on a service that you use at the same time each evening. The incident you report happened when you were the only passenger on the bus. The driver would likely be able to work out that you reported them.

If you do give your contact details

You can ask to remain anonymous if you give DVSA your contact details. However, you might:

  • be contacted for more information
  • be asked to provide a statement
  • have to act as a witness and appear in court

Read the privacy notice for reporting a lorry, bus or coach driver or company to find out more about how your details are stored and used.

What happens next

Make sure you stay safe

For your own safety, do not:

  • tell anyone that you’ve given the information to DVSA
  • try to get more information about the offences you’ve reported or about any other criminal activity
  • encourage anyone to commit a crime so that you have more evidence

Getting feedback on what happened

  • any investigation and criminal or other official proceedings have ended
  • a decision has been made if the person appeals against their verdict

DVSA cannot give feedback on an ongoing case. Criminal investigations can take time.

How to report dangerous driving in the uk

Every now and again, whether you’re a driver or passenger in a vehicle, it’s likely that you’ll come across someone driving dangerously.

According to Thames Valley Police, all fatal or serious accidents on British roads can be linked to what they call the ‘Fatal Four’. These are:

  • Speeding
  • Driving while not wearing seat belts
  • Distraction from the road ahead (e.g. using a mobile phone)
  • Driving while under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol

In addition to these main causes of accidents, dangerous driving can take other forms. Drivers with little knowledge of the road they’re driving on can make mistakes, or elderly drivers with age related ailments may also put themselves – and other drivers – in danger.

Dangerous Driving – Who should I contact?

If you encounter one of these situations where someone is driving a car in a manner that puts themselves, their passengers and other motorists at risk of an accident, should you wish to report them to the police, the best way to do so is by phoning the non-emergency police number by calling 101.

Alternatively a number of police forces across the UK have online forms on their websites where you can submit information.

What information should I give?

When reporting an instance of dangerous driving to the police, you should be able to give several items of important information that the police can use to track down the driver. They are:

  • Vehicle Registration Number (licence plate)
  • Make, model and colour of the car (e.g. A red Ford Fiesta)
  • The time and location of the incident
  • Any information that could identify the driver (e.g. The driver may be working for a company whose name and logo is on the car/van)

Is the information confidential?

Any contact information that you give to the police will be treated in confidence. By giving them your email address, it will enable them to make contact with you should the report you gave require clarification.

What happens next?

The police will weigh up the severity of the incident and also take into account whether the vehicle has been reported before or if the driver is considered to be high-risk. They may then take the following action:

  • Pass the report to the local police force’s Road Policing Unit for them to take any action they feel appropriate.
  • Submit your report to their database of dangerous driving reports, which provides a history of the allegations made against the vehicle and its owner.
  • Send a letter of warning to the registered owner of the vehicle.

At Lightfoot, we’re all about better driving. So have a read of our other articles to find out how you can make your time on the roads that bit better

There is a broad range of offences that come within the scope of a driving offence.

There may be more than one offence that covers particular behaviour. Driving offences range from ‘document’ offences, for example when a person fails to produce a copy of their driving licence or other documents, to cases involving the death of another person.

The offence of dangerous driving under section 2 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 is committed when the defendant’s driving falls far below the standard expected of a competent and careful driver and it would be obvious that driving in that way would be dangerous – section 2A of the RTA 1988.

Some typical examples from court cases of dangerous driving are:

  • racing, going too fast, or driving aggressively;
  • ignoring traffic lights, road signs or warnings from passengers;
  • overtaking dangerously;
  • driving under the influence of drink or drugs, including prescription drugs;
  • driving when unfit, including having an injury, being unable to see clearly, not taking prescribed drugs, or being sleepy;
  • knowing the vehicle has a dangerous fault or an unsafe load;
  • the driver being avoidably and dangerously distracted, for example by:
  • using a hand-held phone or other equipment
  • reading, or looking at a map
  • talking to and looking at a passenger
  • lighting a cigarette, changing a CD or tape, tuning the radio.

The offence of driving without due care and attention (careless driving) under section 3 of the Road Traffic Act 1988 is committed when the defendant’s driving falls below the standard expected of a competent and careful driver – section 3ZA(2) of the RTA 1988.

Some examples of careless or inconsiderate driving are:

  • overtaking on the inside;
  • driving too close to another vehicle;
  • driving through a red light by mistake;
  • turning into the path of another vehicle;
  • the driver being avoidably distracted by tuning the radio, lighting a cigarette etc.
  • flashing lights to force other drivers to give way;
  • misusing lanes to gain advantage over other drivers;
  • unnecessarily staying in an overtaking lane;
  • unnecessarily slow driving or braking;
  • dazzling other drivers with un-dipped headlights.

The main types of driving offences involving fatalities are causing death by dangerous driving, causing death by careless driving and causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs. The driving must cause the death of another person.

  • Driving without a driving licence or insurance – section 3ZB of the Road Traffic Act 1988;
  • Driving while disqualified – section 3ZC of the Road Traffic Act 1988; and
  • Wanton and furious driving – this offence can be used when offences under the Road Traffic Act 1988 are unavailable, for example, when a vehicle is not driven on a “road or public place”, or when the vehicle is not motorised (e.g. a bicycle).

The penalties depend on which of the following offences may have been committed:

  • Causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs (Section 3A Road Traffic Act (RTA) 1988)
    Penalty: 1 to 14 years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both; and disqualified for a minimum of two years;
  • Causing death by dangerous driving (Section 1 RTA 1988)
    Penalty: 1 to 14 years in prison, and disqualified for a minimum of two years;
  • Causing death by careless, or inconsiderate, driving (Section 20 Road Safety Act 2006)
    Penalty: Up to 5 years in prison, and disqualified for a minimum of one year;
  • Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified, uninsured drivers (Section 21, Road Safety Act 2006)
    Penalty: Up to 2 years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both; and disqualified for a minimum of one year;
  • Murder or manslaughter
    Penalty: Up to life-imprisonment, and disqualified for a minimum of two years.

There are offences of causing serious injury by driving dangerously (section 1A Road Traffic Act 1988) and causing serious injury by driving when disqualified (section 3ZD Road Traffic Act 1988).

“Serious injury” means an injury that is within the scope of grievous bodily harm under the Offences Against the Person Act 1861 – really serious bodily harm.

It is illegal to drive if either:

  • the amount of alcohol in your breath, blood or urine is over the prescribed alcohol limit; and
  • you are unfit to do so through alcohol or drugs (legal or illegal) in your system.

Failure to provide a specimen during a road side breath test or at a police station if you are suspected of driving under the influence of drink or drugs is an offence, which is treated as seriously as driving whilst under the influence of alcohol.

It is an offence under the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 to exceed the speed limit for a vehicle of the class that is being driven.

Under Section 172 of the Road Traffic Act 1988, where the driver of a vehicle is alleged to have committed an offence:

The keeper commits an offence if they fail to provide information about the identification of the driver at the time of the offence – section 172 (2)(a)); and

Any other person commits an offence if they fail to provide information which it is in their power to give, which may lead to the identification of the driver – section 172 (2)(b)).

Using a mobile phone or handheld device is a specific offence but also can be considered as dangerous or careless driving.

Penalties include points and a fine. A driver could lose their licence if they have passed their test in the last two years.

Offences include driving:

  • without a driving licence covering a vehicle of the class being driven;
  • without insurance; and
  • without an MOT.

It is also an offence to fail to produce a driving licence – section 164 (1) Road Traffic Act 1988, an MOT certificate or insurance certificate – section 165 Road Traffic Act 1988.

Careless driving falls below the minimum standard expected of a careful driver and includes driving without reasonable consideration for other road users. Dangerous driving includes behaviour that could potentially endanger yourself or other drivers. If you drive in a careless or dangerous way you risk prosecution.

Careless and dangerous driving – the law

It is illegal to drive or ride a vehicle dangerously on the road or without due care and attention or reasonable consideration for other road users.

You could be breaking the law if, while driving or riding, you are guilty of any of the following behaviours:

Careless behaviour

  • tailgating
  • failing to look properly
  • sudden braking
  • overtaking on the inside
  • turning into the path of another driver
  • having your attention diverted by a distraction inside the car, for example, using a mobile phone
  • having your attention diverted by a distraction outside the car, for example, ‘rubber necking’

Dangerous behaviour

  • racing, going too fast, or driving aggressively
  • ignoring traffic lights, road signs or warnings from passengers
  • overtaking dangerously
  • driving under the influence of drink or drugs, including prescription drugs
  • driving while unfit including: having an injury, being unable to see clearly, not taking required prescribed drugs or being fatigued
  • driving whilst knowing the vehicle has a dangerous fault or an unsafe load
  • driving whilst distracted by, for example, reading a map, using a hand-held phone, lighting a cigarette

Read the Highway Code for more information.

The penalties

A driver or rider convicted of a careless or dangerous driving offence risks:

How to report dangerous driving in the uk

Dangerous drivers are a threat to themselves and other drivers around them. Reporting dangerous driving to the local authorities can prevent the destruction of property and—in the case of collisions—prevent injury and even death. If you live in the United Kingdom and see someone driving erratically or dangerously, you can report them in a few different ways. You can call in the driver immediately at 0844 453 0118 or file an online report. If you’d prefer to get the police involved right away, reach out and contact the local constabulary.

Reporting Dangerous Driving Online

Fill in the requested details about the driver and the dangerous incident.

Type in the appearance of the driver (if you got a glimpse of them) along with the make, model, color, and license-plate number of the car. Specify the kind of dangerous driving that the person was engaging in. Finally, state the location of the incident.

  • Types of dangerous driving include driving while intoxicated, driving while distracted (e.g., on your phone), driving with impaired vision, and driving aggressively (e.g., tailgating and cutting off other drivers).

Provide the necessary personal information to complete the form.

Before submitting the form, type in your name, address, and email address. If you do not have an email address, you can leave that option blank or enter your phone number instead. When you are finished with the form, “Submit” it to the DVLA. If they need any more information, they’ll contact you either by phone or email.

How to report dangerous driving in the uk

If you think the driver of a lorry, coach or bus has broken road safety rules, you can report them.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) will deal with your complaint.

Reasons to contact the DVSA include:

  • Breaking drivers’ hours rules
  • Overloading vehicles
  • Using vehicles that are unsafe or unroadworthy
  • Carrying dangerous or hazardous goods without permission
  • Driving an excessively smoky lorry, bus or coach
  • Using emissions ‘cheat’ devices

What information is required?

If you decide to make a report, the DVSA needs to know:

  • Who is involved (the driver or company name)
  • The registration number of the vehicle(s) in question
  • The reason for the complaint
  • When and where the incident took place.

There are three ways to submit the information:

  • Email: [email protected]
  • Telephone: 0800 030 4103 (lines are open Monday to Friday, 7.30am to 6pm)
  • Post: Intelligence Unit, DVSA, The Ellipse, Padley Road, Swansea, SA1 8AN

Can I report anonymously?

How to report dangerous driving in the uk

The DVSA says it won’t ever ask for names or contact details, calls will not be traced and statements will not be required.

Also, if you wish to remain anonymous. you will not be called as a witness or have to appear in court.

However, anyone willing to supply details may be contacted for more information. And they could be asked to provide a statement or act as a witness.

What happens after a report is made?

The DVSA reviews the information before deciding whether or not to examine the case.

Other government agencies or the police might then get involved, depending on the severity of the incident.

You will receive feedback after the investigation, when official proceedings have ended. The DVSA cannot give feedback on an ongoing case.

How to report other crimes

The process is different for other, non-safety related offences, such as drink-driving, speeding and driving while disqualified. In such cases, contact the police first.

To complain about bus driver rudeness or buses not arriving on time, visit the Bus Users website.

Send the footage directly to your local police force

Select a police force below

Thank you for using the Nextbase National Dash Cam Safety Portal. The force you have chosen is working hard towards being fully ready to accept dash cam footage and expects to have this ready shortly. However, you can still use this portal to generate a full witness statement and upload your video. Please be aware that once this has been completed you need to contact your local force by email or by calling 101 . The witness statement can be printed or emailed to your local police force to speed up the process of reporting the incident.

Thank you for using the Nextbase National Dash Cam Safety Portal. The force you have chosen is working hard towards being fully ready to accept dash cam footage and expects to have this ready shortly. However, you can still use this portal to generate a full witness statement and upload your video. Please be aware that once this has been completed you need to contact your local force by email or by calling 101 . The witness statement can be printed or emailed to to speed up the process of reporting the incident.

Thank you for using the Nextbase National Dash Cam Safety Portal. The force you have chosen is not yet using the National Dash Cam Safety Portal. However, you can still use this portal to generate a full witness statement and upload your video. Please be aware that once this has been completed you need to contact your local force by email or by calling 101. The witness statement can be printed or emailed to to speed up the process of reporting the incident.