How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Even the highest-quality audio systems wear out over time, especially if you like to listen to your music at a high volume. If your car’s speakers seem muted or if they are not working at all, you need to check if one or more of your speakers are blown, so that you can have them repaired or replaced.

Part 1 of 2: Listen to your speakers

The first step you should take before replacing a speaker is determining exactly which of your speakers has sustained damage. You can do this simply by listening to them. You should be able to easily identify a speaker with an issue by the sound it makes.

Step 1: Turn up the volume. Turn on your vehicle’s radio, and turn up the volume.

Listen for any distortion in sound quality, such as a hissing sound. If a speaker is blown, the distortion should increase as you turn up the volume.

Listen to each of your speakers to determine which of them are blown.

Step 2: Test your system’s range. Select a song from your CD or MP3 player that has a full range of sound, especially a strong bass.

Under-performance, such as no high frequencies or bass, is a sure sign of a blown speaker.

Step 3: Check the treble and bass. After checking the system’s ranges, assess the treble and bass on your system.

  • Tip: Make sure that each one is right in the middle of the range. Otherwise, the lack of sound may come from the settings rather than a problem with the speaker.

Step 4: Listen for sound issues. Listen to the overall sound from your speakers and check for any crackling or rattling noises. You may also hear a shaking sound.

Rattling from the woofer can indicate a fully blown speaker. Popping may indicate that your tweeter has gone bad.

  • Tip: Touch the large speakers to see if you feel any vibrations. This tells you they are working actively. Smaller speakers may not create vibrations even when they are working.

Part 2 of 2: Inspect the speakers

Materials Needed

  • Battery (9-volt)

Once you have identified which speaker or speakers are having issues, you can check them further with a multimeter.

Warning: Always practice safety while working with electrical equipment to avoid any chance of injury. Do not use or connect tools into a speaker that is still connected to power.

Tip: This is also a good time to check their connections to see if there are any loose connections or other problems. The fix could be as simple as tightening up a loose wire.

Step 1: Disconnect the speaker. Unscrew the speaker from its mount.

Remove the wires from the audio system, and with them still attached to the speaker, attach them to a 9-volt battery.

You may hear a popping sound coming from the speaker. This means the speaker is working. If there is no sound, that indicates the speaker is blown.

Step 2: Check the speaker for vibration. Remove the cover from the speaker, and connect the wires to the battery again.

Watch to see if the cone moves. If it does, that indicates a problem with the connection rather than a blown speaker.

Step 3: Check the speaker with a multimeter. Use a multimeter to test the speaker.

  • Tip: A typical multimeter usually measures voltage, current, and resistance.

Attach the multimeter to each terminal of the speaker where the wires attach.

If the multimeter reads 1.0 ohms, the speaker is working. If it displays a reading of infinite ohms, the speaker has been blown.

Step 4: Determine the amount of damage to the speaker. The amount of damage will determine whether you need to repair or replace the speaker.

Look for any tears or holes on the speaker. You can repair small tears with a sealer that is designed for use with speakers.

Replace a speaker that has a large tear or hole.

Step 5: Repeat these steps with any other speakers. Repeat the above with any other speakers that have sound issues.

  • Tip: Check all of your speakers at the same time so that you can identify any issues correctly and replace them all at once, if necessary.

Extensive damage may mean you need to replace your entire speaker system.

Listen to your speakers periodically and if you notice any difference in the audio quality you can identify any speaker problems early on and fix them.

If you are not sure about the cause of the problem, you can ask an expert audio technician to check your radio system and diagnose the problem before you spend the money to replace some parts or entire speakers that were perfectly alright in the first place.

Next Step

Schedule Car radio is not working Inspection

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Car radio is not working Inspection. Once the problem has been diagnosed, you will be provided with an upfront quote for the recommended fix and receive $20.00 off as a credit towards the repair. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews. LEARN MORE

There could be different parts of the system contributing to this melodious sound you like. But there is one part that plays the primary role, and that is the amplifier. And here, I will guide you on how to tell if your amp is blown which might affect your listening experience.

Signs of a Blown Out Car Amp

Well, there could be plenty of signs that could be quickly manifested by the sound as you turn on the stereo system.

Some of these signs are the following:

  • There is no sound though you have already turned on the audio system.
  • There is a noticeable sound distortion.
  • The stereo system would begin making bizarre sounds like a farting sound.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

If these signs are noticed, you should be aware that the car amp is the one responsible. There could also be chances wherein other components in the car audio system cause the said distortions, but still, the car amp has always something to do with it.

So, fixing a blown out car amp is indeed the best way in order to solve issues together with other affected components. Watch the video:

Reasons and Causes Behind

There could be cases wherein you wonder that you also have audio systems at home too. And so, why the said audio system doesn’t blow out most of the time. Well, there is a significant difference in between a car audio system and a home audio system. And bear in mind that the car audio system would work under different environment.

There is a need for it to face issues including the following:

  • Temperature extremes
  • Various stresses on the road
  • Continuous vibrations

With regards to home audio system, it doesn’t bear such extreme conditions. And these are the reasons why the car amp blows out a lot frequently than the one at home.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

How to Tell If Your Amp Is Blown: Try These Different Ways

And you might be wondering of ways on how to tell if your amp is blown at this moment. Well, there could be troubleshooting ways that will help you on how to figure it out.

Here are the different ways on how to do so:

Is the protection mode of the car amp on?

Before you assume anything with regards to the situation, you need first to check the protection mode of the car amp. There is this provision that once the amp encounters something wrong, then it would switch to the protection mode.

The said suspicious situations would include the condition of the wires of the speakers are touching one another and into short-circuiting. If you put it in a protection mode, car amp will avoid any electrical damage in the system.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

​Is the blue wire connected to the right part of the wiring harness?

​This blue wire is being used in the car audio system as for accessing the amp remotely once the power is turned on. Once it is not properly connected to its right place, then it would fail to offer adequate voltage to the amp.

So, you might think that the amp isn’t working only to find out that it is not the case.

​Do you find fuse blown out already?

​Indeed, every car audio system would include the fuse to prevent damage to the sound system when there is a short circuiting. It is being placed in between the power line. Once the fuse is blown out, then there would be any supply of power to the amp, and it wouldn’t turn on even if you have already set on the power supply.

​So, there is a need for you to check the small metal wire into the fuse and once you find it snapped, there is a need to replace the fuse with a new one.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

​Have you checked the input and output of the amp?

​The input of the amp comes from the head unit. So, if you are bothered about how to check if it is just fine, things could be straightforward. There is just a need to disconnect the RCA cables and then connect the new set that works correctly.

​After being replaced, if the amp could be turned on quickly, you have to change it. However, if you get the input from an edge and not from the others, then there could be some issues in the head unit.

Now that everything works fine, you have to disconnect the current speakers and connect the new set. Once the amp gives the right output, it will work well too. If this is the case, you would need new speakers for the audio system and not for the car amp. You might consider the best 6×8 car speakers.

You need to ask yourself these questions in order to identify whether the car amp is blown and so you could come up with the best way to resolve the issue.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Final Thoughts

Being able to be aware of how to tell if your amp is blown might not be an easy thing for some. And this is the reason why I included the best ways on how to determine such problem.

If you can tell the reason behind blown amp, you are also guaranteed with a chance on how to resolve the said problem. For help, here’s a video to watch on how to repair a blown out car amplifier.

Feel free to post your comments below if you have any questions or suggestions! Happy reading everyone!

Even the highest-quality audio systems wear out over time, especially if you like to listen to your music at a high volume. If your car’s speakers seem muted or if they are not working at all, you need to check if one or more of your speakers are blown, so that you can have them repaired or replaced.

Part 1 of 2: Listen to your speakers

The first step you should take before replacing a speaker is determining exactly which of your speakers has sustained damage. You can do this simply by listening to them. You should be able to easily identify a speaker with an issue by the sound it makes.

Step 1: Turn up the volume. Turn on your vehicle’s radio, and turn up the volume.

Listen for any distortion in sound quality, such as a hissing sound. If a speaker is blown, the distortion should increase as you turn up the volume.

Listen to each of your speakers to determine which of them are blown.

Step 2: Test your system’s range. Select a song from your CD or MP3 player that has a full range of sound, especially a strong bass.

Under-performance, such as no high frequencies or bass, is a sure sign of a blown speaker.

Step 3: Check the treble and bass. After checking the system’s ranges, assess the treble and bass on your system.

  • Tip: Make sure that each one is right in the middle of the range. Otherwise, the lack of sound may come from the settings rather than a problem with the speaker.

Step 4: Listen for sound issues. Listen to the overall sound from your speakers and check for any crackling or rattling noises. You may also hear a shaking sound.

Rattling from the woofer can indicate a fully blown speaker. Popping may indicate that your tweeter has gone bad.

  • Tip: Touch the large speakers to see if you feel any vibrations. This tells you they are working actively. Smaller speakers may not create vibrations even when they are working.

Part 2 of 2: Inspect the speakers

Materials Needed

  • Battery (9-volt)

Once you have identified which speaker or speakers are having issues, you can check them further with a multimeter.

Warning: Always practice safety while working with electrical equipment to avoid any chance of injury. Do not use or connect tools into a speaker that is still connected to power.

Tip: This is also a good time to check their connections to see if there are any loose connections or other problems. The fix could be as simple as tightening up a loose wire.

Step 1: Disconnect the speaker. Unscrew the speaker from its mount.

Remove the wires from the audio system, and with them still attached to the speaker, attach them to a 9-volt battery.

You may hear a popping sound coming from the speaker. This means the speaker is working. If there is no sound, that indicates the speaker is blown.

Step 2: Check the speaker for vibration. Remove the cover from the speaker, and connect the wires to the battery again.

Watch to see if the cone moves. If it does, that indicates a problem with the connection rather than a blown speaker.

Step 3: Check the speaker with a multimeter. Use a multimeter to test the speaker.

  • Tip: A typical multimeter usually measures voltage, current, and resistance.

Attach the multimeter to each terminal of the speaker where the wires attach.

If the multimeter reads 1.0 ohms, the speaker is working. If it displays a reading of infinite ohms, the speaker has been blown.

Step 4: Determine the amount of damage to the speaker. The amount of damage will determine whether you need to repair or replace the speaker.

Look for any tears or holes on the speaker. You can repair small tears with a sealer that is designed for use with speakers.

Replace a speaker that has a large tear or hole.

Step 5: Repeat these steps with any other speakers. Repeat the above with any other speakers that have sound issues.

  • Tip: Check all of your speakers at the same time so that you can identify any issues correctly and replace them all at once, if necessary.

Extensive damage may mean you need to replace your entire speaker system.

Listen to your speakers periodically and if you notice any difference in the audio quality you can identify any speaker problems early on and fix them.

If you are not sure about the cause of the problem, you can ask an expert audio technician to check your radio system and diagnose the problem before you spend the money to replace some parts or entire speakers that were perfectly alright in the first place.

Next Step

Schedule Car radio is not working Inspection

The most popular service booked by readers of this article is Car radio is not working Inspection. Once the problem has been diagnosed, you will be provided with an upfront quote for the recommended fix and receive $20.00 off as a credit towards the repair. YourMechanic’s technicians bring the dealership to you by performing this job at your home or office 7-days a week between 7AM-9PM. We currently cover over 2,000 cities and have 100k+ 5-star reviews. LEARN MORE

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

It’s a too-often-spread misconception that, in the realm of mobile, home and even pro audio, too much power will blow loudspeakers. Sure, that’s true to a point – you wouldn’t pair, say, a 20,000-watt amplifier that was designed to drive monitors at rock concerts with bookshelf speakers meant to be used in a small apartment or dorm room – but in a general sense, there really is no such thing as “too much power” when it comes to consumer-grade speakers. In fact, we keep telling readers of our articles that the healthiest thing you can do for loudspeakers is to feed them clean, continuous current…which brings us to the flip side of that coin. No, what generally kills speakers and their drivers is distortion caused by insufficient amplification and/or mismatching of components, and in this article we’re going to divulge how you can actually tell if your car audio speakers are blown out.

A Primer

Did you ever find yourself wondering if you blew one or more of your speakers because of strange sounds you’re hearing from them? Have you been concerned that perhaps you mated the wrong amp with the wrong set of speakers, and sound quality had been affected by this mismatch? You’re not alone.

Indeed, one of the most frustrating things that can happen to a mobile audio speaker – or any speaker for that matter – is for them to completely blow out. Blown car speakers are not only difficult to repair, the sound “quality” they exhibit is reduced and extremely off-putting; in many cases, you’ll be able to identify whether a speaker is blown immediately by just listening.

Tweeters and other types of drivers, such as woofers, can exhibit issues with wiring, power levels, distortion and more, and each of these can produce results that don’t actually mean the speaker is blown. It is for this reason that you must check to be sure that the speaker is blown before deciding to buy a new one.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

What to Do

Step One: Listen to the Speaker – If you suspect a speaker in your car stereo system may be blown, listen to it carefully by first stopping your vehicle somewhere safe and so that no other noises can distract you. If a speaker is completely blown, it will likely produce no sound and may just exhibit a soft “hissing” or “ringing” characteristic instead. • Step Two: Check by Touch – When it comes to larger speakers like woofers and subwoofers, they will actually vibrate when actively producing sound from an amplifier; turn the volume of your system up and place your hand against the front padding of the speaker, and if you do not feel any vibration, it is likely your larger speaker is not working properly. • Step Three: Isolate the Speaker in Question – Using the fader control on your head unit, try to isolate the speaker or speakers that you may think is/are blown; if you can focus the sound to one portion of the vehicle, you will be better able to tell if the speaker in question is not functioning.

Wrapping it Up If the problem seems to be relegated to a single speaker, ensure that this speaker is still actually wired to your amp and head unit properly.

Looking for some amazing photos of Car Stereo installs? Check out our coverage from the Largest Car Stereo contest in the world Slamology!

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Car Stereo Troubleshooting Tips for Common Performance Issues

Do your car speakers sound off? Is the sound not as clear as it once was? You might have a blown speaker or another issue with your car stereo.

Unfortunately, blown out speakers are more common than we’d like, especially with stereos that have gotten a lot of use with plenty of bass-heavy music over the years. Incorrectly installed speakers, most often with incompatible components, are another common cause for damage and deterioration.

Thankfully, there are easy ways to tell if you have a blown speaker, not to mention diagnose other issues with your car stereo system.

We’ve put together a few car stereo troubleshooting to help you get your sound back to the crystal-clear quality you want from your sound system.

Diagnosing the Problem: What to Check and Listen For

If your car stereo doesn’t sound as good as it used to, your first step should be to listen to what’s coming out of the speakers.

Sit in your parked car and turn on your stereo without starting the engine. You want to avoid any excessive noise, so keeping the engine off is a must.

Play a song you’re familiar with over your stereo. Ideally, you’ll want something with a fairly broad range of sound to help determine how your speakers are responding.

Give it a listen—how’s it sound? Give it another listen with a neutral bass and treble setting, and turn up the volume.

Keep your ears (and eyes) open for some of these issues:

Distortion at Medium Volumes

The hissing or fuzzy sound of distortion is a common sign of partially blown speakers. Listen for this fuzzy sound when turning up the volume on your speakers and take note if it gets increasingly worse as you turn up the volume.

Fuzzy, muffled, and crackling sounds are typically caused by a damaged voice coil.

No Vibration

Speakers create sound through vibration. Thus, if you can’t feel any vibrations when you touch your speakers, the cone of the speaker might not be receiving power. Power issues could be a result of a wiring issue or a component that is malfunctioning in the car stereo system.

Lack of Range

If you notice a lack of high, medium, and/or bass frequencies in your car stereo sound, your speakers are likely partially blown. Listening for lack of range is only completely possible if you know the song by heart, so be sure to listen to your favourite tunes to check for this issue.

Rattling and Popping Sounds

If the only sound coming from your woofers is a rattling sound, then your speakers are likely blown. Another sound to keep an ear out for is popping. If you hear popping sounds coming from your speakers, then your tweeters are likely damaged.

Car Radio Isn’t Working

If you have trouble turning your car stereo on altogether, or there are issues with the display and sound turning on and off, then there is likely an issue with the power, wiring, fuse, ground connection, or a loose connector at the back of the head unit.

Testing Connections

To test the connection to the speakers, remove the speaker wires from the amp, and attach the wires to a 9-volt battery. Remove the speaker cover so you can look at the speaker while you’re testing it and see if the cone is working properly. If the cone is working, then there is a problem with the connection and not the speaker.

Infinite Impedance

An easy way to test a speaker’s performance is by testing its electrical response. A multimeter tester helps you figure out if the cone or voice coil is damaged.

Set the meter to ohms, make sure the speaker is turned off, and touch the lead of the multimeter to the speaker terminals. A multi-meter reading of 1.0 ohms means the speaker is not blown, but a reading of infinite ohms means it is blown. A completely blown speaker will have infinite impedance.

Testing Car Stereo Components

Since the amplifier is the power source for your speakers, you should also test this component when troubleshooting a damaged car stereo system. A damaged amp with a problem fuse or capacitor will distort the sound of your speakers.

To test the amp, grab your multimeter reader and open the amp’s fuse box. Touch the red wire on the multimeter to a pole on the fuse. Touch the black wire to another pole. If you hear a beeping sound after doing this, then the fuse is likely in good condition, and there is probably a problem with the capacitor. If you don’t hear a beep, then the fuse is blown and needs to be replaced.

Repairing Damage

Inspect your speaker for visual signs of damage by removing the cover and looking for tears, cracks, splits, and holes. Most of the damage is usually noticeable on the cone of the speaker. You can also gently run your hands over the speaker to feel for scrapes and clean out dust and dirt.

Repairing Minor Damage

You can repair small holes and tears in your speakers with a speaker sealer. But keep in mind that while this will improve the speaker’s sound quality, it will not restore the sound back to its original quality.

To make your partially or severely blown speakers sound like new again, you will either need to replace them or have them professionally repaired.

When Should You Take Your Car Stereo Into the Shop?

This is easy. If your speakers are damaged, bring your stereo into a car audio specialist to restore them to their former glory. Car audio experts can repair damaged speakers and even reinforce them so they can have an extended lifespan.

Unfortunately, speakers and car stereo systems experience wear and tear over time. But if you know what to look (and listen) for, you can figure out the best route to repairing your stereo and having it sound like new again.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

We’ve heard this story before: you’re driving down the road, listening to your favorite song. You’re really into it, and you decide to turn up the volume. You crank it up. then a little more. and a bit more. and then the loudest part of the song comes on. Next thing you know, your speakers don’t sound quite the same. You ask yourself the obvious question: did I blow my speakers?

When your speakers are blown, you’ll generally notice that they’ve started to emit an unpleasant, rattling, hissing type of sound. This unusual sound tends to become more prominent as you increase the volume of whatever’s coming through the speakers. “Blowing” your speakers refers to the physical act of damaging the diaphragms that produce sound: if you turn up the gain (volume) of the signal too high, it can actually cause physical harm to these delicate diaphragms.

More often, though, speakers will blow as the result of some kind of an electrical issue: a fitting that’s not been attached correctly, a bad fuse, or a loose coil. This means that you might notice your speakers starting to sound blown even though you haven’t recently listened to music at a high volume. It’s also pretty common for a junk car to have blown speakers (although if you’re looking to sell your junk car, the fact that the speakers are blown isn’t going to affect the price you’re offered).

Are My Speakers Blown?

Just because your speakers are still producing a sound doesn’t mean that they aren’t blown. In fact, the flat, tinny, brittle sound that often comes out of blown speakers can exist alongside a fairly normal signal. It’s sometimes hard to tell whether your speakers are blown until you turn the volume up. You also might become accustomed to the way that your speakers sound when they’re blown. But, if you listen to them side by side with a fully functional set of speakers, you’ll be able to tell the difference.

Most speakers don’t blow in their entirety. Instead, one (or sometimes more than one) of the components will suffer damage. A car speaker system consists of multiple parts, typically including:

Woofers, which produce the bass frequency range. Some vehicles don’t have woofers, but many of them do. If a woofer blows, the bass signal of the sound coming out of your speakers will practically disappear.

Tweeters, which produce the high end of the audio frequency range. If tweeters are blown, music will often sound too bassy.

Cones, which are associated with the “midrange” of the frequency band. Blown cones will often rattle, producing an audibly unpleasant sound.

If you’re concerned that you may have blown a speaker, contact a car audio professional to inquire about repair. Remember, though: if you have a junk car that you’re looking to sell, don’t worry about fixing the speakers! Rusty’s Auto Salvage will pay you top dollar for your junk car, no matter what condition it’s in. Contact us today for a free quote.

Your car stereo is one of those things that you take for granted until something goes horribly awry. When you get in your vehicle you expect to be able to turn it on and your favorite station or CD will start like it always does and sound good. If it doesn’t go on or if what you hear is different than usual (in a bad way), maybe you have a blown or partially blown car speaker. If you do need to replace your car stereo speakers, then I strongly recommend you pick up a copy of Secrets of a Professional Installer to learn how to switch out your old speakers with new ones.

Let’s investigate your car audio system to see if you have any blown speakers!

    How a speaker works. This is the short version. A car speaker consists of a circular magnet surrounding a coil that is attached to a cone-shaped diaphragm. Current goes through the coil of the speaker. Current is made, in this case, by an amplifier in your stereo. That current alternates at a frequency that is the same as the sound waves that generated it and induces an alternating magnetic field in the coil. The polarity of the magnetic field of the coil switches positive to negative, so it is attracted to and repelled by the permanent magnet. The coil vibrates, then the cone vibrates and what you have is a facsimile of the original sound.

The best to know whether your car’s stereo speakers have a problem is by using your ear; distorted sounds or the buzz of the cone vibrating against the coil are the best indicators that it’s time to replace your speakers. Your mechanic or a good car stereo shop will be able to do the job for you.

Sooner or later, every car audio system experiences a malfunction of some kind. It could be the result of something fairly trivial like a loose ground wire. Or it could be something more serious like a blown car speaker. You have two options at this point. You could also have a look into upgrading your car’s sound system and get a brand-new speaker. When it comes to speakers, yea I bought the first one on this list for my uber driver lol. He was mentioning how he couldn’t play music for his passengers, as his speaker was faulty, so I thought I’d do my part and get him a Bluetooth speaker.

But why just do this? Why not go all the way and get a subwoofer too? It’s a great combination and it’ll give you the best audio sound! Check it out here for more information.

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

If you think you’ve got a blown car speaker on your hands, look for the following tell-tale signs when diagnosing the problem.

Distortion at Moderate Volumes

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

The unmistakable hiss or “fuzz” that comes from a partially blown speaker is tough to miss once you know what to listen for. It should be fairly obvious that something is amiss if increasing volume leads to ever greater levels of distortion from your car speakers. Fuzzy speakers are usually the result of damaged or loose voice coils.

System Range Is Incomplete

How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Bad speakers under-perform for a variety of reasons. Unless the voice coil has become detached from the cone, you’ll still get some audio though it will be incomplete. For instance, a lack of high frequencies or bass is a surefire sign that your speakers are at least partially blown and need to be looked at.

There’s No Vibration

As we all know, speakers create sound through vibration. If you touch the front of your speakers and don’t feel any vibration, the cone isn’t receiving any power. This could be the result of a wiring problem or a malfunctioning component farther back. In either case, you’ll need to crack your speakers open to solve the problem. How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Audible Rattling and Popping

Besides classic fuzz and distortion, there are other clear-cut audible signals that point to major problems. For instance, nothing but rattling coming from your woofers indicates a fully blown speaker. Likewise, a popping sound generally means that your tweeters are finished. Fortunately, these problems can be easily fixed if you know what you’re doing.

Impedance Is Infinite

One of the easiest ways to diagnose a speaker’s performance issues is by testing out it’s electrical response. With a standard multi-meter, you can quickly determine whether or not your voice coil or cone is busted. If your speaker is completely blown, observed impedance will be essentially infinite. How to tell if your car speakers are blown

Blown Speaker Damage Control

When audio system problems occur, many automatically assume the worst. The truth is that these issues can be fixed rather easily. If you observe any of the mentioned symptoms, consult Joe’s Stereo for an assessment. We’ll quickly tell you what’s wrong with your speakers and how we can help.