How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

This article was co-authored by Padam Bhatia, MD. Dr. Padam Bhatia is a board certified Psychiatrist who runs Elevate Psychiatry, based in Miami, Florida. He specializes in treating patients with a combination of traditional medicine and evidence-based holistic therapies. He also specializes in electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), compassionate use, and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Dr. Bhatia is a diplomat of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and a Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association (FAPA). He received an MD from Sidney Kimmel Medical College and has served as the chief resident in adult psychiatry at Zucker Hillside Hospital in New York.

There are 14 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 100% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 98,783 times.

The use of any type of psychiatric drug – antidepressant, sleep medication, anti-psychotic or ADHD medications – isn’t always a permanent situation. Doctors often prescribe such drugs for a period in a patient’s life when such medication will be therapeutic for treatment of concentration issues, anxiety, sleeping disorders or other quality of life considerations. In some cases, the patient suffers side effects from the drugs themselves that cause more problems and quality of life issues than the psychiatric ailment itself. These types of medications often cause “discontinuation symptoms” which can possibly be avoided or lessened by a slow weaning process instead of stopping “cold turkey.” This article will suggest how to get off psychiatric drugs safely. It is important to note that you should never stop taking psychiatric drugs without first consulting your doctor.

You may want to know how I got off psych drugs, why I was put on them to begin with and why I decided to go off. This video explains some of that.

As a teenager, I was labeled with depression and given Prozac. I took it for about a year and it made me manic, less sensitive to others, more impulsive, more of a social butterfly, less able to be still and calm. It also gave me acne. One day I just stopped taking it.

In college, I had a spiritual opening and went into somewhat of a spiritual retreat state for awhile. Childhood trauma, physical health issues, religious confusion, genuine spiritual experiences and many other things played a part in my “meltdown.”

In a way, I love meltdowns. I love that people have them. I want us to all be safe to have them. My meltdown(s) from the ages of 18-21 did not feel safe, except for the spiritual aspects. I was force drugged, shot with tranquilizers against my will, and hospitalized.

The drugs and “treatments” given to me made me much sicker, physically and mentally. I went from being a bright, smart, energetic young woman (with a lot of trauma), to being lethargic, sick, unable to think, drugged into oblivion, emotionally flat. I was on the lowest doses of most drugs that I was prescribed, but they still made me exhausted, dull, and sick.

Many people in my life including parents, doctors, and friends, thought these drugs would be helpful. Few guessed that it was the drugs that were making me much sicker. I experienced myself becoming mentally ill as a result of the drugs. I could hardly think at all.

Others saw me as becoming more and more mentally ill, but they didn’t know why. I had a fever with no infection, for 3 months. Many antibiotics were tried, many tests given, but the cause of the fever was never found

A doctor later suggested it was a drug fever, caused by all the medications I was on. I later learned I had neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

During this time, I had many other worldly experiences. It was like a long near death experience. I felt close to my grandparents and others who had died, but little if any connection to anyone or anything on Earth. I ate the same foods everyday and didn’t leave my apartment at all for those 3 months. Songs and poems came to me from beyond; they certainly could not have come for my own brain, which was barely functioning!

This time was a shamanic opening for me-I certainly have never felt the same since.

After the fever went away, on December 25th, 2002, I decided to try coming off one of the drugs I was on, a neuroleptic called Risperdal.

How I got off psych drugs was not a straight line or a quick, easy path. Reducing the drug gave me panic attacks and made me feel truly insane in a way I had never felt before. So I got back on it by my psychiatrists suggestion. Then I had a dream guiding me to reduce Risperdal by even less so I tried again.

I was on 6 or so other drugs at the same time including sleeping pills, antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, and thyroid medication (even though no thyroid problem had ever been determined).

How I got off psych drugs was by going very slowly, tapering one drug after another, seeing my energy, aliveness, health and strength rapidly return with each reduction.

It still took me a long time to fully recover from the toxicity and damage done during the 2 years I was on all those drugs, and there may have been some permanent damage as well.

During this time, I went back to college and finished my degree. It seemed like magic to me since I had not known if I would ever re-enter the outside world. Part of me knew I would recover from the whole experience and live to tell about it, but I had no idea how.

It was during this reduction period that I was introduced to Freedom Center. This was really how I got off psych drugs. Here’s the first radio interview I did with a founder of the Freedom Center.

The Freedom Center is a group of people who identify as psychiatric survivors and I worked with them for about 7 years to provide alternative treatments for those experiencing extreme states of consciousness.

I taught yoga, meditation and creative writing and shared my personal story to audiences large and small. Telling my story felt like the most meaningful thing I could do and every time I did it I felt so full of purpose, love, and spiritual guidance.

Having the support of Freedom Center during my transitional period was invaluable. It was how I got off psych drugs. I got so much information from the other survivors than I ever got from doctors or therapists. I wish for everyone to have this type of communal support and hope I can be a voice of reason and confidence in all who need a perspective from someone who has been through it.

I have been working as an activist for change in the “mental health” system and provided holistic mental health alternatives for the past 15 years, starting as a Freedom Center organizer for six years in Northampton, Massachusetts.

I have consulted for the Western Massachusetts Recovery Learning Community, Massachusetts Protection and Advocacy council, Windhorse Associates, and Alternative to Meds Center.

I was the community organizer of the Mental Health Association of Portland, assistant director of Portland Hearing Voices and a Warm Line specialist at the Mental Health Association of San Francisco, helping to launch their Warm Line.

I have taught at numerous conferences related to coming off psychiatric drugs including NARPA, INTAR and Alternatives.

I studied creative writing and experiential education at Hampshire College, and am a Kripalu certified yoga instructor. I also blog on the popular site Mad In America.

eBook includes PDF, ePub and Kindle version

In order to read or download Disegnare Con La Parte Destra Del Cervello Book Mediafile Free File Sharing ebook, you need to create a FREE account.

Download Now!

eBook includes PDF, ePub and Kindle version

We have made it easy for you to find a PDF Ebooks without any digging. And by having access to our ebooks online or by storing it on your computer, you have convenient answers with How To Get Off Psychiatric Drugs Safely 2010 Edition There Is Hope There Is A Solution . To get started finding How To Get Off Psychiatric Drugs Safely 2010 Edition There Is Hope There Is A Solution , you are right to find our website which has a comprehensive collection of manuals listed.
Our library is the biggest of these that have literally hundreds of thousands of different products represented.

Finally I get this ebook, thanks for all these How To Get Off Psychiatric Drugs Safely 2010 Edition There Is Hope There Is A Solution I can get now!

cooool I am so happy xD

I did not think that this would work, my best friend showed me this website, and it does! I get my most wanted eBook

wtf this great ebook for free?!

My friends are so mad that they do not know how I have all the high quality ebook which they do not!

It’s very easy to get quality ebooks 😉

so many fake sites. this is the first one which worked! Many thanks

wtffff i do not understand this!

Just select your click then download button, and complete an offer to start downloading the ebook. If there is a survey it only takes 5 minutes, try any survey which works for you.

lol it did not even take me 5 minutes at all! XD

Antipsychotics should be included in a review of withdrawal guidelines.

THE BASICS

  • What Is Psychopharmacology?
  • Find a therapist near me

Key points

  • Antipsychotic drugs have serious withdrawal effects for about half of people who try to come off them.
  • In UK, antipsychotics continue to be excluded when reviewing guidelines about how to come off psychiatric drugs.
  • Doctors’ lack of awareness about antipsychotic withdrawal effects often leads them to think the original problem is returning.
  • People often come off antipsychotics “cold turkey” and then get no support from the prescriber.

Last month I wrote an open letter, as Chair of the International Institute of Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal, requesting that the UK’s National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) reverse its decision to exclude antipsychotic medications from the guidelines NICE is writing for “Medicines Associated With Dependence or Withdrawal Symptoms.”

Here is a slightly abbreviated version of the 10 reasons we gave.

1. An important scientific paper describing how patients can safely come off antipsychotic medication while minimising the risk of withdrawal effects, and risk of relapse, has just been published. 1

Professor David Taylor, the study’s senior author, and Professor of Psychopharmacology at King’s College London, commented: “Antipsychotics induce long-lasting changes to nerve cells in the brain and they need to be withdrawn very slowly (and in a particular way) to allow time for the brain to reset.” 2

2. The first systematic review and meta-analysis on the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms after antipsychotic discontinuation found that “a weighted average of 53% individuals showed withdrawal symptoms after abrupt antipsychotic discontinuation and placebo substitution.” 3 A survey of antipsychotic users (the largest to date — from 30 countries) found that 65% reported withdrawal effects when trying to stop and that 51% of these described their withdrawal effects as “severe.” 4 Participants’ comments included:

“Withdrawal from the anti-psychotic was torturous and took a very long time” and

“Withdrawal symptoms were always blamed on relapse of my ‘disease.’” 5

3. Other bodies that support the inclusion of antipsychotic drugs in the NICE review include: all four groups initially participating in NICE’s own guideline scoping, the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Prescribed Drug Dependence, and the UK’s largest mental health charity, Mind. Even drug companies Grünenthal and Pfizer support inclusion.

4. NICE’s position that “these medicines are prescribed for very specific defined conditions” and therefore the issues are dealt with by NICE guidance for schizophrenia, is untenable. The current NICE guidance on schizophrenia (CG178) relating to the safe stopping of antipsychotics only states “if withdrawing antipsychotic medication, undertake gradually and monitor regularly for signs and symptoms of relapse.” This is clearly inadequate to guide prescribers on how to stop these medications safely. We trust NICE will urgently update this guidance also.

5. Furthermore, antipsychotic drugs are increasingly prescribed “off label,” e.g. for insomnia and anxiety, and for “behavioural management” in prisons and care homes. Only around 50% of people prescribed antipsychotics in the UK have a psychotic condition. 6 The care of the other 50% will not be guided by the schizophrenia guidelines even after NICE has updated them.

6. Antipsychotic drugs are one of the fastest-growing classes of drugs being prescribed in England, increasing from 9.4 million prescriptions in 2015/2016 to 11 million prescriptions in 2019/2020.

7. Antipsychotics are often prescribed against the person’s will. This creates a particularly strong duty to carefully consider withdrawal effects when making treatment decisions.

THE BASICS

  • What Is Psychopharmacology?
  • Find a therapist near me

8. Without formal guidelines for withdrawal, long-term prescription of antipsychotics is common and can cause severe, sometimes dangerous, adverse effects.

9. One reason NICE has given to justify their exclusion of antipsychotics is that the Royal College of Psychiatrists, unlike other mental health groups, opposes inclusion. We believe that NICE has been far too dependent on the views of the College for far too long and that this may have facilitated decades of denial and minimisation of the withdrawal effects of other psychiatric drugs, such as antidepressants.

10. There are already two sets of guidelines 7, 8 that could, along with this week’s paper by Mark Horowitz and his colleagues, 1 form the basis for the development of NICE guidelines for antipsychotic withdrawal. We hope these will be helpful to you in the coming months.

Perhaps we should have listed the adverse effects of antipsychotic drugs 4, 5, 9 which lead so many people to come off them, often with no support. They include drowsiness/sedation, serious weight gain, diabetes, cardiovascular problems, reduced brain volume 10 and shortened life span. 11

Psychopharmacology Essential Reads

We’re Being Bombarded by Ads for Drugs

Why Is It So Hard to Lose Weight After Antidepressants?

While antipsychotics may have some short term benefits, primarily sedation, long term use leads to negative outcomes for many people. 12

There is currently very little research into just how slowly people should come of these drugs, and with what sort of strategies and support. 1, 13

The International Institute of Psychiatric Drug Withdrawal believes that it is only a matter of time before decades of minimisation of the withdrawal effects of antipsychotic drugs will cease, as has recently been the case for antidepressants. Only then can the millions of people trying to get off these drugs receive the help they need to do so safely.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

When you’re living with a mental health problem, or supporting someone who is, access to the right information is vital.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

If you’re finding things hard emotionally right now, you’re not alone. We’re here to provide information and support.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

We won’t give up until everyone experiencing a mental health problem gets support and respect.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

Together with our 20 local Minds in Wales we’re committed to improving mental health in this country. Together we’re Mind in Wales.

  • News
  • News
  • Legal news
  • Mind’s media office
  • Our campaigns
  • Campaigns
  • Mind Cymru Campaigns
  • Our events
  • Mind Media Awards
  • Peerfest
  • Marsh Awards

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

There are lots of different ways that you can support us. We’re a charity and we couldn’t continue our work without your help.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

We’re taking the nation’s craftiest fundraiser online.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

Tips, guidance and blogs to support your organisation.

Coronavirus: Find our information and support and more on our work

  • Home
  • >
  • Information & Support
  • >
  • Drugs and treatments
  • >
  • View this information as a PDF (new window)
  • About antipsychotics
  • How antipsychotics can help
  • Taking them safely
  • Dosage
  • Antipsychotics in pregnancy
  • Side effects
  • Depot injections
  • Comparing antipsychotics
  • Coming off antipsychotics
  • Alternatives to antipsychotics
  • Anti-Parkinson’s drugs
  • Useful contacts
  • Antipsychotics A-Z
  • About antipsychotics
  • How antipsychotics can help
  • Taking them safely
  • Dosage
  • Antipsychotics in pregnancy
  • Side effects
  • Depot injections
  • Comparing antipsychotics
  • Coming off antipsychotics
  • Alternatives to antipsychotics
  • Anti-Parkinson’s drugs
  • Useful contacts
  • Antipsychotics A-Z

Withdrawal from antipsychotics

There may also be reasons that you want to stop taking antipsychotics. For example, you may be experiencing unpleasant side effects. Or you may want to try other ways of coping with your mental health.

Some doctors may suggest that you keep taking antipsychotics for some time. This is usually to reduce the risk of your symptoms coming back. But you may feel that this is the wrong choice for you.

This page covers:

See our page on alternatives to antipsychotics for ideas on managing your symptoms without medication. Or see our pages on coming off medication for information about making the decision to come off, withdrawal symptoms and finding support.

“I feel so much better being off – less drugged up and more alive.”

How easy is it to come off antipsychotics?

Some people may be able to stop taking antipsychotics without problems, but others can find it very difficult. If you have been taking them for some time, it can be more difficult to come off them. This is especially if you have been taking them for one year or longer.

If you are considering stopping taking antipsychotics, it is worth thinking about the following:

  • It is safest to come off slowly and gradually. You should do this by reducing your daily dose over a period of weeks or months. The longer you have been taking a drug for, the longer it is likely to take you to safely come off it.
  • Avoid stopping suddenly, if possible. If you come off too quickly you are much more likely to have a relapse of your psychotic symptoms. It may also increase your risk of developing tardive psychosis.
  • Get support from people you trust. Ideally this will include your doctor or psychiatrist. It also includes getting support from friends and family. And you could try peer support to find support from others who have had similar experiences to yours.

Unfortunately, your doctor or psychiatrist may not support your decision to come off antipsychotics. This may mean they don’t offer as much help as you would like. Our page on support for coming off psychiatric drugs has information about other ways to find support.

Remember: whether to continue or stop taking medication is your decision, and you have the right to change your mind.

5 tips for when you want to come off your medication

Kat from Mind’s information team gives five tips for when you want to come off your medication.

“I took myself off and found I could feel emotions again, which was scary, but worth it.”

When should I come off antipsychotics?

There’s no perfect time to try coming off antipsychotics. Everyone is different, and there are many factors that might affect your experience of coming off.

If you are considering when to stop your medication, it might help to think about the following:

  • What else is going on in your life right now? If you’re under lots of extra stress, will this affect your ability to cope? For example, you may feel more stressed than usual if you are moving house, experiencing financial worries or concerned about your family.
  • Would you prefer to feel relaxed and unburdened while you come off your medication? This may help you pay close attention to how you’re feeling day to day. Or would you find it easier to be busy while you come off, so you’re distracted by other things?
  • Have you got a support group nearby or other people in your life who can provide any help you may need?
  • If you’ve tried to come off your medication before but have not been able to manage it, what factors might have played a part then? Can you avoid or minimise them when you try again?

Whenever you decide to try coming off, it is best to withdraw slowly and safely. It might take a long time, or you might find that you become comfortable on a lower dose and decide not to come off completely. The main thing is that you find a way to manage your symptoms that works for you.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

When you’re living with a mental health problem, or supporting someone who is, access to the right information is vital.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

If you’re finding things hard emotionally right now, you’re not alone. We’re here to provide information and support.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

We won’t give up until everyone experiencing a mental health problem gets support and respect.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

Together with our 20 local Minds in Wales we’re committed to improving mental health in this country. Together we’re Mind in Wales.

  • News
  • News
  • Legal news
  • Mind’s media office
  • Our campaigns
  • Campaigns
  • Mind Cymru Campaigns
  • Our events
  • Mind Media Awards
  • Peerfest
  • Marsh Awards

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

There are lots of different ways that you can support us. We’re a charity and we couldn’t continue our work without your help.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

We’re taking the nation’s craftiest fundraiser online.

  • How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

Tips, guidance and blogs to support your organisation.

Coronavirus: Find our information and support and more on our work

  • Home
  • >
  • Information & Support
  • >
  • Drugs and treatments
  • >
  • View this information as a PDF (new window)
  • Deciding to come off medication
  • Planning for withdrawal
  • Withdrawal symptoms
  • Self-care during withdrawal
  • Support services
  • Alternatives to psychiatric medication
  • For friends and family
  • Useful contacts
  • Deciding to come off medication
  • Planning for withdrawal
  • Withdrawal symptoms
  • Self-care during withdrawal
  • Support services
  • Alternatives to psychiatric medication
  • For friends and family
  • Useful contacts

How can I look after myself as I come off?

Coping while coming off medication can be hard, but there are lots of things you can do that might help. This page suggests some things you could try while coming off:

For more tips that you could put in place before coming off your medication, see our page on planning for withdrawal.

Talk to someone

It can be hard to reach out, but it’s important to share what you’re going through. If you don’t feel you can talk to the people around you, you could try contacting a helpline. For example, you can talk to Samaritans for free on 116 123 or [email protected] .

For more options see our page on helplines and listening services.

Keep a mood diary

Recording details of your medication and mood in a diary could help you remember helpful details. For example, when you started tapering your medication, what doses you’ve taken and when, and the effect of different doses on your mood. This may help you notice any patterns or early signs that things are becoming more difficult for you.

You could also try monitoring your mood using an online tool or app. The NHS apps library has a list of apps that you can use to support your mental health and track your mood.

Make a self-care box

Many people find that when they are feeling unwell their thinking can get confused and they struggle to make decisions or come up with ideas for what can help them feel better. For this reason it can be really helpful to put together a box of things when you are feeling ok that might help you when you are in a difficult patch. For example, you could include:

  • favourite books, films or music
  • a stress ball or fiddle toy
  • helpful sayings or notes of encouragement
  • pictures or photos you find comforting
  • a soft blanket or cosy slippers
  • a nice-smelling candle or lavender bag
  • anything that is comforting to you or helps you to distract yourself.

Try other treatments

Other types of treatment could help you cope during withdrawal. For example, you may want to try talking therapy and counselling, arts or creative therapies, or complementary and alternative therapies.

See our page on alternatives to psychiatric medication for more information on these.

Be open to changing your plans

Coming off medication isn’t something you can ‘succeed’ or ‘fail’ at, it’s more about what is best for you at a particular moment in your life. For example, you might find you need to reduce more slowly, or stay at one dose for longer than you had planned. Try to remember that coming off medication can be a very slow process involving a number of steps and adjustments.

If withdrawing from medication isn’t going as well as you’d hoped, this can feel really disappointing. But this doesn’t mean you won’t be able to come off in the future if this is still what you want.

It’s also important to remember that you can change your mind about coming off. You don’t have to keep withdrawing after you’ve started.

How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

The Icarus Project and Freedom Center’s 52-page illustrated guide gathers the best information we’ve come across and the most valuable lessons we’ve learned about reducing and coming off psychiatric medication. Based in more than 10 years work in the peer support movement, this Guide is used internationally by individuals, families, professionals, and organizations, and is available a growing number of translations. Includes info on mood stabilizers, anti-psychotics, anti-depressants, anti-anxiety drugs, risks, benefits, wellness tools, psychiatric drug withdrawal, information for people staying on their medications, detailed Resource section, and much more. A ‘harm reduction’ approach means not being pro- or anti- medication, but supporting people where they are at to make their own decisions, balancing the risks and benefits involved. Written by Will Hall, with a 55-member health professional Advisory Board providing research assistance and more than 50 collaborators involved in developing and editing. The guide has photographs and art throughout, and a beautiful original cover painting by Jacks McNamara.

Now in a revised and expanded Second Edition.

Download a printer version, with scrambled pages ready to fold into a booklet (print double sided on legal paper, or send to a shop; booklet assembly instructions here). Download a powerpoint version here.

Download a European printer version in English, with scrambled pages ready to fold into a booklet (print double sided on A4 paper).

You can also order a bound, color cover edition through bookstores.

Translations

The Guide is available in the following languages, some also with printer versions:How to get off psychiatric drugs safely

A Documentary Film

Please Note: Nothing on this website constitutes medical advice. We simply encourage patients to educate themselves about psychiatric medications.

No one should abruptly stop prescribed psychiatric medications. Patients need to slowly taper off their drug(s) over a period of many months even years. Without slow tapering the symptoms of prescribed drug withdrawal can be severe, possibly life threatening and disabling.

Unfortunately many doctors are not knowledgeable about the need for patient-centered, slow tapering off psychiatric medications. Many doctors will taper a patient off psychiatric medications much too quickly, over weeks or months, even though the patient may have been on the drug for years. When alarming physiological, emotional, psychological symptoms develop, this is often viewed as the illness coming back – and often used as a reason why the patient needs to stay on the medication.

However, there are some resources on the internet which are based on medical research and lived experience that can help educate patients about safe tapering and enlighten doctors about de-prescribing.

Below is an excellent article by researcher and psychiatrist, Josef Witt-Doerring, appearing in a professional journal, Psychiatric Times. https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/addiction/online-communities-drug-withdrawal-what-can-we-learn

Council for Evidence-Based Psychiatry (U.K.)

A British website that highlights the latest medical research on the failures and problems associated with psychiatric medications.

Please see their very useful page which lists many websites that offer support and information for people withdrawing from psychiatric drugs.

The Withdrawal Project

Offers detailed information about safe micro-tapering methods to get off of psychiatric medications.

Mad In America

MIA is the pre-eminent journalism website that offers stories, news, debate, and science around the issues of mental health, psychiatry, and the current paradigm of mental illness. Their Parent Resources section has drug information that is concise and useful.

Benzo Buddies

A peer support forum designed for people in psychiatric drug withdrawal or tapering from benzodiazepines and Z-drugs.

Surviving Antidepressants

A peer support forum designed for people in psychiatric drug withdrawal or tapering from antidepressants.

Harm Reduction Guide to Coming off Psychiatric Drugs

A 52-page guide that explores harm reduction and supporting people to make the decision that is best for them in taking all kinds of psychiatric drugs.

Addiction Dependency Solutions (Oldham, UK)

ADS is a leading UK drug and alcohol charity operating throughout the North and the Midlands, with decades of experience treating drug, alcohol and more recently prescription drug addiction.

Battle Against Tranquilisers (Bristol, UK)

Supporting individuals to reduce the harms caused by prescribed drugs of addiction and withdrawal through a wrap-around service of one to one therapy, group therapy and a telephone support service.

Bristol and District Tranquilliser Project (Bristol, UK)

Helping people who are experiencing involuntary addition to prescribed minor tranquillisers, slipping pills, and antidepressants.

R.E.S.T. Minor Tranquilisers Service (Camden or Islington Boroughs, UK)

We offer advice and information, counselling, a weekly peer support group, access to the Foundations of recovery program, mindfulness, complementary therapies and support for family members and partners.

The Bridge Project (Bradford, UK)

Reconexxion (Australia)

Treatment, support and information about benzodiazepine dependency and withdrawal, anxiety, insomnia and depression.