How to get to know someone better

Selling well requires that you ask for–and gain–commitments. We move from one commitment to the next commitment, from target to close. If you’re going to gain those commitments, you’re going to have to ask for them. Here’s how to get better at asking.

Tie Your Ask to Future Value Creation

One way to improve your ability to gain a commitment is to focus on the future value you’re going to create. What will the client get out of allowing you to have the commitment you ask for? If you ask for access to their decision influencers, how will that benefit them? If you ask for access information, how will giving you that information help them?

By justifying your ask, you make it easier for your dream client to give you the commitment you need.

As a side note, if it’s early in the sales process the best way to create value is to give them information and ideas they can use whether they choose you or one of your competitors. This makes it easy to say yes. If it’s late in the sales process you show how only you can create the kind of value that you’re describing, differentiating yourself from your competitors in a way that’s compelling to your prospective client.

Earn the Commitment Before You Ask

The more value you create during each sales interaction, the more you earn the right to ask for the commitment you need. If it’s early in the sales process and you help your dream client with ideas that benefit them, you make it easier to gain a commitment to move forward.

But the opposite of this is also true. The less valuable you are during each sales interaction, the more difficult it is for you to ask for again the commitments that you need. You haven’t earned them.

It’s easy to ask for and obtain the commitments that you have earned. It’s much more difficult when you haven’t earned the right to ask. Do the work to deserve the commitment you’re asking for.

Practice Asking

You get a lot better asking if you practice. The more you practice asking, the more comfortable you are with the words coming out your mouth, the easier it is for you to ask. Most salespeople won’t do this. They’re too shy. They’re too embarrassed. They don’t think they need to practice. But the rewards are high for those brave souls who will rehearse the words and practice the language.

You might practice with a group of your peers. If you’ve got a really “game” group, you’ll be brave enough to critique each other and offer suggestions. You also get the opportunity to listen to the language that other salespeople use, and you can steal some of it to use in your own sales interactions.

If you want to get better at anything faster, practice. If you don’t have enough opportunities to practice in real sales interactions, rehearsing with your peers is a great substitute.

Remember, You’re In Sales

Don’t worry about being salesy. Guess what? You’re in sales. Your dream client already knows you’re a salesperson. They knew that when you called and asked for the appointment.

Instead of worrying about being “salesy,” worry instead about the points above. If you tie your ask to future value creation, if you create value during every sales interaction, and if you’re well rehearsed and comfortable with the language, you can ask directly very comfortably with no problem.

You’re in sales. And selling is a game of commitment gaining. Get comfortable asking for the commitments you need.

Questions

Have you earned the commitments that you ask for?

How do you create value during every sales interaction?

Do you have good language choices that allow you to tie the value that you create on one sales interaction to the value you create by being allowed to have the commitment that you need?

Do you rehearse your language choices? What would it sound like if you did?

We live in the age of technologies. And if 10 years ago the Internet was considered a plague for the younger generation, now people communicate, work, and buy online. It’s become a part of our lives; people even find love on the Internet!

But how to get to know the person through texting? There are voice messages and video chats now, but it all usually starts from a text. It might be awkward from the beginning, but your curiosity should be satisfied. There are several topics that most people are OK talking about, and that will help you get to know the person better.

Here, we’ll see those topics and talk about the taboos based on the experience of people using services like Goldenbride.net .

Interests and Hobbies

This is a vast topic you can talk about for days. If it turns out you have similar hobbies or interests, this will bring you closer immediately. And if not, you’ll get a chance to learn about life from a totally different perspective, which is also very useful!

There are situations when people can’t answer quickly. You ask them about hobbies, and they get lost. Maybe it’s a ton of studies or work, or maybe there are other reasons. It’s like when you ask someone about a movie you could watch, and all potential answers just get somewhere.

It’s fine; you can talk about it later, little by little, and maybe even help the person find out what their hobbies are!

Dislikes

Exploring dislikes is also important to avoid confusion in the future. Do it carefully because we are all different, and certain topics might be very sensitive. There are general things people don’t like, such as the government, quarantine, studies, etc. Try to explore these topics or just ask directly.

It’s important to know not only what the person likes and how to have a good time with them but also what frustrates them. Talking about the negative stuff for days isn’t very useful, so make sure you keep the balance if you can.

Goals for the Future

The topic of the future is either super-intimidating or you can talk for two days about it without sleep. Dreams, goals, fantasies are all very tempting, and people generally feel very good talking about them and sharing their vision. Some other people get anxiety from that, so realize who you’re talking to before getting into the topic.

It’s very useful to find out what the person wants to do in the near future. Maybe you want to continue talking and then ask them to go on a date, expecting the beginning of a happy relationship, and they want to go to China for a year to work and find themselves. You never know.

You can get inspired or inspire them to pursue dreams after a couple of convos about the future. Isn’t that wonderful?

Family

When you get to know each other better, it might be time to talk about families. When you know the situation, you won’t make inappropriate jokes and will understand the person better. A lot of insights appear when people find out about each other’s family situation.

Start with small questions, and don’t push a person if they don’t want to answer. Sometimes the topic is very sensitive, and it’s wise to respect personal boundaries. Later on, family stories will start to emerge, and you both will have a lot of fun sharing your experience. Peeking into how another family lives is usually very interesting.

DON’Ts If You Want to Get to Know People Better Via Texting

Here are some huge no-nos you should avoid when texting with someone:

How to get to know someone betterImg source: pexels.com

  • Don’t write dry.
    This depends on the person, of course, but usually, people feel the vibe much better if you use smileys or some exclamations here and there. If you don’t, they might think you’re talking to them against your will. Be friendly; the tone means a lot. Dry answers won’t leave a good impression. Even if you want to show that you’re tough, adapt your tone a bit if you want to get to know the person better.
  • Don’t ask intimate questions.
    Not right away, at least. Later on, when you know each other, it will be a very useful topic. You’ll find out a lot of new things about the person and get to know their preferences, maybe even flirt. Who knows where all this will lead, right? But from the very beginning, it’s worth finding out other things about the person. You won’t leave a good impression asking inappropriate questions right away.
  • Don’t play with sensitive topics and their feelings.
    When you find out the person has some sensitive topics or hurt feelings, don’t play with those things. It might be very interesting to try and talk about it, but there will be time for that. Don’t take everything as a joke, and if you get some valuable answers from them, be grateful. This means they are opening a little bit to you.
  • Don’t make it an interview.
    Don’t shoot questions as if you’re about to decide whether to hire the person or not. Pick a pace and follow it in an organic conversation. Take a genuine interest in every topic, tell about yourself when asked or when you have to support the conversation. Nobody likes talking to someone who just asks questions one after another. That’s not a conversation; that’s a real interview.

How to get to know someone betterImg source: pexels.com

Remember: a lot depends on the person . Someone is very open and can talk about anything. They will continue the conversation until bedtime and be ready to start it again the minute they wake up.

But there are also people who are more closed, have more traumas from the past, and are afraid to open to a new person. It doesn’t mean they’re bad or not fun. As you get to know them, you’ll develop a very deep connection, opening up to them and letting them do the same.

What do you really want? What life balance will make you happy?

How to get to know someone better

How to get to know someone better

How well do you know yourself?

Has your answer to that question changed over the last 12 months?

The last year has seen many people take a step back from their routines, rituals and relationships and offered them a chance to reflect. The slowness of lockdown and the feelings, fears and separation we have had to face might have raised a few questions over what’s truly important to us.

Perhaps, as restrictions ease, there are some things we can’t wait to embrace once more, like seeing family and friends, group hobbies and staycations. But there might also be things we don’t want to slot back into our routines. In addition, while we’ve been at home more, we might have reignited a passion that we now need to find time for in our post-pandemic lives, like a craft, hobby or gardening.

So, as we begin to think about life slowly returning to some sort or normality, what do you really want? What life balance will genuinely make you happy?

Country Living spoke to Dr Elena Touroni, a consultant psychologist and co-founder of My Online Therapy, to ask for some tips on how we can all get to know ourselves a bit better. That way, we can act on what we’ve learnt about ourselves during recent months.

Here’s her advice.

How can we get to know ourselves better?

If we want to get to know ourselves better, the first step is to pinpoint our values. Ask yourself:

  • What matters to you?
  • What brings you joy?
  • Where would you like to be in the future?

Values are a bit like a compass. When we’re feeling lost or directionless in life, they give us a sense of purpose and direction. But, most importantly, they ensure that we’re being our most authentic selves.

By making life choices that align with these values we may find that we’re happier and more fulfilled. So it’s a great place to start if you want to figure out what makes you tick.

It’s also helpful to take time to tune into our mind and body. Identify the thoughts, feelings and physical sensations you are feeling today and make it a daily practice. Becoming more self-aware and mindful can help us identify who we are and what we stand for.

How can we get to the root of our values?

It’s useful to try to pinpoint your values. Values might include things like being honest, adventurous, loyal, playful, compassionate or independent.

To get closer to your values, it can help to look back on moments in your life that stood out to you.

They may be significant, beautiful moments in your life (like the birth of your child or a work achievement), or perhaps it’s more of a sad or bittersweet moment (like losing a loved one or facing a deep-rooted fear). Even difficult moments are important because the pain reminds us of what we care about and value.

Once you have identified these moments, take a minute to sit with your emotions. These experiences set a path for you. They might have even shaped your life as it is today.

If you could name this path or journey what would you call it? What values do you think it demonstrates? Chances are it’ll help you identify what you value most in life.

Key takeaways:

  • Get-to-know-you questions are a great way to meet new people or introduce new teammates.
  • Ask thoughtful, open-ended questions to create an engaging dialogue.
  • Actively listen and remember their answers, recalling them later to build rapport.

Getting to know the people in your workplace can have benefits for you and your coworkers. While getting personal in the workplace can sometimes be challenging, with the right attitude and some proven get-to-know-you questions you can get the process moving in the right direction. In this article, we will discuss the importance of questions to get to know people in the workplace as well as examples of specific questions you can use for a better connection with coworkers.

What are get-to-know-you questions?

Get-to-know-you questions are questions that help you better understand, relate to and know the people you work with. These questions can range from casual to in-depth depending on your goal with the person you are speaking to. Incorporating these kinds of questions into your workplace can act as an icebreaker for new employees, a way to bond with current employees and help boost overall job productivity among your team.

Why are getting-to-know-you questions important?

Asking questions shows people that you are interested and would like to know more about them. Such an exchange can further your working relationship among both coworkers and individuals you manage. The more interest you show in others, the more they will respect and like you.

Additionally, if you are a manager, getting to know your team members can help build trust and promote open communication between you and those you manage. While it may seem simple, showing your team members you are interested in them can have many benefits for your team’s overall production and job satisfaction.

Additional benefits of get-to-know-you questions in the workplace include:

  • Learning why someone is in the work position they are in
  • Discovering your team’s weaknesses and strengths
  • Increasing your employees’ overall happiness at work
  • Helping new employees feel more comfortable and part of the team
  • Building positive relationships with your coworkers or employees
  • Allowing your staff to get to know you better
  • Acting as an icebreaker for employees and managers

How to ask get-to-know-you questions

There are several different ways and circumstances in which you can appropriately ask getting-to-know-you questions. For example, you could stop by a coworker’s cubicle and start a conversation based on the photos they have on display. Have they traveled a lot? Do they have pictures of their heroes or favorite sports teams pinned on the walls? This is a great way to start a conversation because it flows naturally from elements that your coworker has already introduced.

Additionally, if you are a manager, you could incorporate icebreaker questions into your weekly or monthly team meetings. Go around the room and have each person answer one get-to-know-you question they pull from a hat. Doing this can help warm everyone up to each other and set the tone for a more communicative and creative meeting.

The key to asking questions to get to know someone within the workplace is to keep the questions respectful and appropriate. For example, asking about previous work history or what they love about their job is a great example of an appropriate get-to-know-you question. However, asking your coworker what the cause of their recent divorce was is probably not a great question to ask, especially if you don’t know them that well.

The more thoughtful, positive and respectful you keep your questions to get to know people at work, the better the conversation will go. If you’re unsure whether a question is proper for the workplace, consider how you would feel if someone asked you the same question. If it’s a question that would make you uncomfortable, it’s probably best to avoid asking it at work.

55 great questions to get to know people at work

Whether you are holding a team meeting or casually chatting at a coworker’s cubicle, there are countless questions you can ask to get to know someone. Get started with these 55 questions:

Key takeaways:

  • Get-to-know-you questions are a great way to meet new people or introduce new teammates.
  • Ask thoughtful, open-ended questions to create an engaging dialogue.
  • Actively listen and remember their answers, recalling them later to build rapport.

Getting to know the people in your workplace can have benefits for you and your coworkers. While getting personal in the workplace can sometimes be challenging, with the right attitude and some proven get-to-know-you questions you can get the process moving in the right direction. In this article, we will discuss the importance of questions to get to know people in the workplace as well as examples of specific questions you can use for a better connection with coworkers.

What are get-to-know-you questions?

Get-to-know-you questions are questions that help you better understand, relate to and know the people you work with. These questions can range from casual to in-depth depending on your goal with the person you are speaking to. Incorporating these kinds of questions into your workplace can act as an icebreaker for new employees, a way to bond with current employees and help boost overall job productivity among your team.

Why are getting-to-know-you questions important?

Asking questions shows people that you are interested and would like to know more about them. Such an exchange can further your working relationship among both coworkers and individuals you manage. The more interest you show in others, the more they will respect and like you.

Additionally, if you are a manager, getting to know your team members can help build trust and promote open communication between you and those you manage. While it may seem simple, showing your team members you are interested in them can have many benefits for your team’s overall production and job satisfaction.

Additional benefits of get-to-know-you questions in the workplace include:

  • Learning why someone is in the work position they are in
  • Discovering your team’s weaknesses and strengths
  • Increasing your employees’ overall happiness at work
  • Helping new employees feel more comfortable and part of the team
  • Building positive relationships with your coworkers or employees
  • Allowing your staff to get to know you better
  • Acting as an icebreaker for employees and managers

How to ask get-to-know-you questions

There are several different ways and circumstances in which you can appropriately ask getting-to-know-you questions. For example, you could stop by a coworker’s cubicle and start a conversation based on the photos they have on display. Have they traveled a lot? Do they have pictures of their heroes or favorite sports teams pinned on the walls? This is a great way to start a conversation because it flows naturally from elements that your coworker has already introduced.

Additionally, if you are a manager, you could incorporate icebreaker questions into your weekly or monthly team meetings. Go around the room and have each person answer one get-to-know-you question they pull from a hat. Doing this can help warm everyone up to each other and set the tone for a more communicative and creative meeting.

The key to asking questions to get to know someone within the workplace is to keep the questions respectful and appropriate. For example, asking about previous work history or what they love about their job is a great example of an appropriate get-to-know-you question. However, asking your coworker what the cause of their recent divorce was is probably not a great question to ask, especially if you don’t know them that well.

The more thoughtful, positive and respectful you keep your questions to get to know people at work, the better the conversation will go. If you’re unsure whether a question is proper for the workplace, consider how you would feel if someone asked you the same question. If it’s a question that would make you uncomfortable, it’s probably best to avoid asking it at work.

55 great questions to get to know people at work

Whether you are holding a team meeting or casually chatting at a coworker’s cubicle, there are countless questions you can ask to get to know someone. Get started with these 55 questions:

How to get to know someone better

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We often meet new people at parties or through work situations. Do you have a good way to get to know someone new without just talking about your job and where you are from?

Usually you are just looking for a pleasant way to pass the time and maybe to find a new friend. So most people know it’s best to avoid talking about politics, religion and sexual orientation. The best way to really get to know someone is to learn what they do (with their spare time) and what they like (probably also shows up in what they do).

Below are 50 simple questions to ask to get to know someone. It will give you some new ideas for topics to discuss when meeting someone new. Be ready with your own answers too!

Get to know someone by learning what they like

Would you rather…

  1. Watch Star Wars or Star Trek? Harry Potter or The Lord of the Rings? Use whichever movies you find most relevant.
  2. Read on a Kindle or paperback book? This question is a starter for many possible conversations on reading, favorite books, technology, libraries, bookstores and more!
  3. Go to a play or musical?
  4. Go to the theater or a movie?
  5. Wear jeans or chinos?
  6. Have a Margarita or Pina Colada?
  7. Drink a glass of Guinness or Fat Tire?
  8. Drink coffee or beer?
  9. Crash with friends or stay in a hotel?
  10. Visit Europe or Mexico?
  11. Vacation in Hawaii or Alaska, and why?
  12. Choose a free trip or money? This may tell you whether the person values experiences over dollars.
  13. Stay in a hotel or an Airbnb home?
  14. Go skiing or snowboading?
  15. Travel by plane, train, or automobile?
  16. Enjoy a houseboat or speed boat?
  17. Go climbing or zip lining?
  18. Hike or bike?
  19. Go to a comedy club or dance club?
  20. Have a night out or evening in?
  21. Watch TV or read a book?
  22. Go canoeing or waterskiing?
  23. Camp in an RV or stay in a tent?
  24. Use Facebook or Twitter?
  25. Use iPhone or Android phone?
  26. Win the lottery or find your perfect job?
  27. Swim in a pool or the ocean? Salt water and waves crashing on the beach or temperature controlled, lovely water all year round.
  28. Travel by sailboat or cruise ship?
  29. Watch sports or play sports?
  30. Play dodgeball or kickball?

Get to know someone by learning how they think

  1. Who would you want with you if you were stranded on a deserted island?
  2. If you could do anything you wanted right now, what would it be?
  3. If money was no object, what would you do all day?
  4. Where do you most want to travel, but have never been?
  5. What is your favorite memory?
  6. Who is your favorite author?
  7. What is your favorite book?
  8. Who do you look up to and why?
  9. What was your favorite activity in gym class? (Personally I think the ______ were a lot of fun.)
  10. What has been your biggest challenge?
  11. What is your biggest success up until now?
  12. What does your perfect day look like?
  13. What is one thing that you can’t live without right now?
  14. University or life experience, which do you feel best prepares you for life?
  15. What is the one thing that should be taught in school that isn’t already?
  16. If you were to create a piece of art, what would the subject be?
  17. What one thing would you change if you had to do it over?
  18. If you could go back in time, what year would you travel to?
  19. What does your life say about you?
  20. How would your friends describe you?

How to start the conversation normally

Rather than just asking a question, say: “Movies are fun, but the theater is a richer experience. I recently saw … and loved it. What do you prefer, movies or theater?”

Don’t just go rattle off question after question; let the question you ask naturally lead into a conversation. Once they tell you if they prefer theater or movies, probe into what about their choice that makes it preferable.

You can even try this communication hack to make the conversation even more natural: Want To Break The Ice And Get Close To Someone Quickly? Try This Communication Hack

What do you really want? What life balance will make you happy?

How to get to know someone better

How to get to know someone better

How well do you know yourself?

Has your answer to that question changed over the last 12 months?

The last year has seen many people take a step back from their routines, rituals and relationships and offered them a chance to reflect. The slowness of lockdown and the feelings, fears and separation we have had to face might have raised a few questions over what’s truly important to us.

Perhaps, as restrictions ease, there are some things we can’t wait to embrace once more, like seeing family and friends, group hobbies and staycations. But there might also be things we don’t want to slot back into our routines. In addition, while we’ve been at home more, we might have reignited a passion that we now need to find time for in our post-pandemic lives, like a craft, hobby or gardening.

So, as we begin to think about life slowly returning to some sort or normality, what do you really want? What life balance will genuinely make you happy?

Country Living spoke to Dr Elena Touroni, a consultant psychologist and co-founder of My Online Therapy, to ask for some tips on how we can all get to know ourselves a bit better. That way, we can act on what we’ve learnt about ourselves during recent months.

Here’s her advice.

How can we get to know ourselves better?

If we want to get to know ourselves better, the first step is to pinpoint our values. Ask yourself:

  • What matters to you?
  • What brings you joy?
  • Where would you like to be in the future?

Values are a bit like a compass. When we’re feeling lost or directionless in life, they give us a sense of purpose and direction. But, most importantly, they ensure that we’re being our most authentic selves.

By making life choices that align with these values we may find that we’re happier and more fulfilled. So it’s a great place to start if you want to figure out what makes you tick.

It’s also helpful to take time to tune into our mind and body. Identify the thoughts, feelings and physical sensations you are feeling today and make it a daily practice. Becoming more self-aware and mindful can help us identify who we are and what we stand for.

How can we get to the root of our values?

It’s useful to try to pinpoint your values. Values might include things like being honest, adventurous, loyal, playful, compassionate or independent.

To get closer to your values, it can help to look back on moments in your life that stood out to you.

They may be significant, beautiful moments in your life (like the birth of your child or a work achievement), or perhaps it’s more of a sad or bittersweet moment (like losing a loved one or facing a deep-rooted fear). Even difficult moments are important because the pain reminds us of what we care about and value.

Once you have identified these moments, take a minute to sit with your emotions. These experiences set a path for you. They might have even shaped your life as it is today.

If you could name this path or journey what would you call it? What values do you think it demonstrates? Chances are it’ll help you identify what you value most in life.

We’ve all been in that situation, where we’re simultaneously obsessed with someone, but also aware at the back of our minds that we really don’t know them at all. That leads to a whole series of questions, such as, “Do we share any interests? Will I actually like them if I get to know them better? Will getting to know them better increase or decrease the chance of the friendship/relationship lasting?”

Although ignorance may be bliss in certain situations, when it comes to getting to spending time with someone and connecting with them on a personal level, you should know what you’re getting into. Revealing questions need to be asked to try and get to know that person better, especially when it comes to seeing, and if they don’t meet the criteria, then it’s time to move on to greener pastures.

What’s in a question?

There are different kinds and styles of questions that can be asked to try and work someone out. The first kind of question is that which tries to discern personal tastes and inclinations–to see if there is an ostensible match.

The second kind is the kind that tries to work out if the person asked is aware/bright enough to realize when certain things should or shouldn’t be said; no one wants to be hooked up with a social pariah.

The third kind is that which, although seeming to suggest a particular choice of answers, is actually looking for the way someone handles the question and, therefore, life. It is up to you, the reader, to decide which is which in the following list.

#1 What do you like to drink? From the working class beer, to the red-wine-drinking sophisticate, the champagne hedonist, and the whiskey traditionalist, what someone chooses as their tipple can tell you reams.

#2 Who would you haunt if you were a ghost? Not really an opportunity to actually see who they would haunt, but to gauge their character. Answers can be cutesie, imaginative, or even downright vindictive—draw your own conclusions.

#3 What’s your most embarrassing memory? Again, it’s not the actual answer that is important, but how they approach it. Them saying they don’t have one shows they’re a little too serious. Happily volunteering the information shows they are confident and comfortable with themselves.

#4 What’s the best birthday present you’ve ever gotten? This is a good way of working out if you’re seeing a philanthropist or a materialist.

#5 What kind of cuisine do you like? This can tell you so much. Are they sophisticated and erudite *think French or Vietnamese*, sensual and pleasure-loving *Italian or Thai*, or down-to-earth and straightforward *American or German*?

#6 Do you like children? There’s something honest and refreshing about someone who says they love kids, but don’t want any of their own right now. What’s worrisome is the desperation of someone who says they EXIST to have kids, or, at the opposite end of the spectrum, someone who can’t abide the sight of them. Both are big warning signs for someone who is socially maladjusted.

#7 When was the last time you talked to your parents? If they can’t even manage to make that basic relationship work, then what chance do you have with them? Of course, an answer of “every day for the last twenty years” contains its own relationship pitfalls.

#8 What kind of films do you like? This is definitely a taste question. Do they like the non-cognitive joys of an action movie, a thinker’s thriller, or something that relies upon beautiful photography and direction? The answer to this question is a dead giveaway to the kind of package you’re signing up for.

#9 Who would you get to play you in a movie of your life? This is a great way to separate an egotist from a self-hater, or a comedian from an earnest ponderer. This question can tell you so much, as it essentially reveals someone’s self-perception.

#10 Are you on social media? Not just a “yes or no” question, but an opportunity to discern to what extent. Are they gregarious or aloof? That’s what this question will immediately inform you of.

#11 What would your friends say about you? Worth asking, just to bear in mind for when you actually meet those friends. You’ll soon get an insight into how delusional they are—or not.

#12 Which three guests would you have dinner with, alive or dead? Whoever the imaginary invitees are will reveal whether the person asked is a listener, a fighter, a hero, or a lover. Of course, there is no right answer; it all depends on what you’re looking for!

#13 What kind of things do you read? The wrong answer is “nothing,” but otherwise, this is a useful question to work out the cultural proclivities of the person asked.

#14 When was the last time you cried? A refusal to admit to crying displays a lack of emotional maturity—NOT a desirable trait.

#15 What has been your greatest success? This question offers another opportunity to identify the rogue materialist, which might be exactly what some people are looking for.

#16 What’s your favorite sport? If you’re looking for the Sheldon Cooper type, then you would probably hope for a “none” in response. Otherwise, sports can tell you so much about how people-oriented those asked are, or how sociable. There is a big difference, for example, between a long-distance runner and football player.

#17 What three things would you take with you if you were stranded on a desert island? This question can reveal all kinds of weird stuff. Just keep your incredulity to yourself, and your ears well and truly open.

#18 If you could go back in time, when would you travel to? As in the case of number 17, be prepared for some weird-ass answers.

#19 What kind of holidays do you like? This is a traditional catch-and-match kind of question. After all, holidays are an important part of a healthy relationship, and you’re going to need to know if those are times that you will be able to spend together in harmony, rather than bitching about where you could have been!

#20 What question do you most want to ask me? What you’re looking for here is that they even have a question in mind. If they don’t, it shows they’re really not that interested, after all.