How to keep warm

Erin Huffstetler is a writer with experience writing about easy ways to save money at home.

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How to keep warm

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During the colder parts of the year, it can be tricky to stay warm without cranking up the heat. Fortunately, there are methods to help you stay warm that don’t involve increasing your utility bill. Some are things you can do for yourself while others are tips for improving the warmth of your space.

Here are 13 simple and cost-effective ways to stay warm.

Dress in Layers

Everyone knows you should add a sweater, jacket, and other layers when you go outside in cold weather. You can apply the same principle inside, too. Layers will insulate your body and make it easier to regulate your body temperature. You can add or remove layers as needed to stay comfortable.

Wear Thick Socks or Slippers

Keeping your feet warm will make your whole body feel warmer. For an extra cozy feel, slip on a pair of ultra-warm wool stocks. Or keep a pair of slippers or shoes to wear around the house, especially if you tend to have cold floors.

Use the Oven and Stove for Cooking

The oven and stove both generate heat in your kitchen. This is why it’s recommended to make no-cook and no-bake meals during the warmer months. But in the colder months, the opposite advice applies: Use the stove and oven often to add heat to your home.

Leave the Oven Open After Baking

Every time you use your oven during the colder months, leave it open after you’re done baking. This will allow the hot air to escape and add heat to the room. However, be cautious about doing this if you have children or pets; make sure they can’t reach the hot oven door or inside the oven. And never use the oven as a primary source of heat, especially if your appliance uses natural gas. Burning natural gas for long periods can increase carbon monoxide levels in your home.

Enjoy a Cup of Soup

Besides warming up your space, you also can warm yourself from the inside. Opt for hot meals, such as a cup of soup, on cold days. And consider making your own soup from scratch. Soup generally takes a while to cook, and the simmering pot on the stove will generate heat in the kitchen.

Drink Warm Beverages

In addition to hot meals, you can apply the same principle of warming yourself from the inside with your beverage choices. Keep coffee, tea, cider, hot cocoa, or your other favorite warm drinks on hand for when you’re feeling cold. The liquid will feel toasty going down, and a hot mug is excellent for heating cold hands.

Use a Humidifier

Humid air generally feels quite a bit warmer than dry air. And running the heat in the colder months can strip your indoor air of its humidity. To balance this, consider using a humidifier. Look for the models that allow you to choose between warm and cold air; they typically cost more but are well worth it for the heating ability.

Reverse the Ceiling Fan

It might seem counterintuitive to use a ceiling fan when you’re feeling cold, but it actually can help to warm you up. Let your ceiling fan turn at a low speed in a clockwise direction during the colder months. This will help to push the warm air that rises toward the ceiling back down toward floor level.

Use Microwaveable Heating Pads

Heating pads are fairly inexpensive, and they can make a huge difference when you’re cold. Use a heating pad on your hands and feet when you’re sitting or lying down to feel considerably warmer overall. You can even make a basic heating pad yourself by sewing dried beans inside a piece of 100 percent cotton fabric, which you then can microwave in 30-second increments until it’s at your desired temperature.

Clear Heat Vents, Registers, and Radiators

It’s recommended to have your heating system inspected annually, ideally before the cold weather arrives and you must rely on it to heat your home. It’s also important to make sure the heat can adequately warm your space. Pull furniture, curtains, and other items away from heat vents, registers, and radiators. If they’re blocked, the heat won’t be able to circulate.

Don’t Run the Bathroom Fan After Showering

Because humidity can make a space feel warmer, skip using the bathroom fan when you shower. Then, leave the bathroom door wide open after your shower, so the humidity can spread to other parts of your home. However, if mold has a tendency to grow in your bathroom due to high humidity, consider using the fan, at least for a few minutes.

Spend More Time Upstairs

Hot air rises. So if you have multiple levels to your home, aim to spend more time on the upper level to take advantage of the warmer air there. You could even move your home office or TV from downstairs to upstairs over the colder months to have a cozier setting.

Do Something Active

Movement generates body heat. And there are many ways to get your body temperature up by being active. For instance, you could clean the house, exercise, tackle a home repair, or play a game. Consider setting a timer as a reminder to get up and move every so often, so your body doesn’t become so cold and stiff that you don’t feel like being active.

Tips When Cooking in Stages

How to keep warm

Whether it is a weekend morning and you’re making batches of pancakes, or cooking up several dishes for a holiday dinner, finding a way to keep the food warm is often a necessity. Luckily, there are several different methods available in your own kitchen to keep that French toast, deep-fried food, and even mashed potatoes from turning cold.

An important thing to keep in mind is that food that is kept out and not kept adequately warm or cool (lower than 40 F or higher than 150 F) may be dangerous to consume. Keep a thermometer handy to check food temps.

Your Oven

Some ovens actually will have a “warm” setting, which is usually 170 to 200 F, or a warming drawer, which is meant to keep foods at a level, warm temperature. If your oven has neither, set it to 200 to 250 F. Transfer the cooked food to a baking sheet, an oven-safe saucepan, or a baking dish and cover with aluminum foil before placing in the oven.

If you are trying to keep batches of pancakes, waffles, fritters, or any deep-fried items warm, place them in a single layer on a cooling rack set over a baking sheet to prevent them from getting soggy or soft. You may also want to loosely cover with foil to prevent the outside from browning any further.

For food that must be kept warm for more than 15 or 20 minutes, check with an instant-read thermometer to be sure it is at least 140 F; if it is not, then increase the oven temperature a little. Keep in mind that if you try to keep the food warm for more than an hour or two, the texture of the food may become spongy or the flavor profile might change. Consider reheating closer to serving time instead.

Slow Cooker or Chafing Dishes

For hot vegetables, sauces, stews, and soups, a slow cooker or chafing dish may be used on the low setting to keep the food warm. Similar to an oven, if you plan to store foods for longer than an hour, you may notice a change in texture or taste. Although the appliance is set to warm, the food may continue to slow cook to a slight degree.

Rice Cooker and Other Steam-Based Cookers

If you use a rice cooker to make rice, then the rice will most likely stay hot and moist for an hour or more while on its on the “warm” setting. If you are using a steaming method of cooking, you can usually keep a food warm if you remove the heating element from the steam cooker (remove it from the stovetop or turn off the electric steamer) and put the cooking vessel aside. You might want to open the lid for a quick moment to let the steam escape so the food does not continue to cook. Replace the lid and set the cooker aside until ready to serve.

Cooler or Insulated Bag

We may think of using our cooler or insulated shopping bag when transporting food that needs to be kept cold, but both are also great at keeping foods warm. If the food is not in a covered dish, transfer to a covered container or wrap in aluminum foil and store in the cooler or bag. Check the temperature of the food every once in a while to make sure it doesn’t dip below 140 F.

Warm Plates for Serving

If there isn’t a lot of time between when the food is done and when you’re going to serve it, but enough time for the food to cool down slightly, heating the plates the food will be served on is a solution. Make sure your plates are oven-safe—ceramic plates maintain heat nicely.

To warm plates for serving, stack them in an oven for 15 minutes at the lowest oven temperature, like 150 to 200 F. You could also use a warming drawer or toaster oven, if large enough. Alternatively, you can warm the plates in the microwave for one to two minutes. If you do a lot of entertaining, you might want to invest in an electric plate warmer.

If you warm plates in the oven, make sure you use an oven mitt at all times, inform others that the plate is hot, and do not shock the plate by putting it in a cold place like a refrigerator. The thermal shock from hot to cold can cause the plate to break.

Aluminum Foil

If you need to keep food warm for the short-term, wrapping or covering with aluminum foil will do the trick. Just keep in mind the foil will keep in the heat for only about 30 minutes or so.

If you are trying to keep a roast, steak, or whole bird warm, tenting with aluminum foil while it rests will benefit the meat in two ways: It will keep it at a warm temperature while allowing the juices to redistribute. Just make sure you cover it loosely with foil; if you cover it tightly, you will make the hot meat sweat and lose the valuable moisture you are trying to retain. A roast is best when rested for 10 to 20 minutes before carving, but resting time will depend on its size. A turkey can sit from 20 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the bird (the larger the bird, the longer the resting time). Steaks or chops should stand, tented in foil, for 5 minutes before serving.

How to keep warm

Using these tips, you can stay warm no matter how frightful the cold weather outside gets.

1. When cold weather is on the way, warm yourself first.

It’s easier to change your body temperature than room temperature, not to mention more eco-friendly. Instead of turning up the heat, put on another layer of clothing.

2. Wear a hat made for cold weather.

Your mom may have said that you lose 80 percent of your body heat through your head, but that’s not actually true. If you’re otherwise clothed, you’ll lose heat from any surface that’s exposed in cold weather. So put on your hat, even if you’re inside.

3. Turn on the ceiling fan.

Warm air rises to the ceiling. Run your fan on its lowest setting in a clockwise direction to push the warm air back down to where you can feel it.

4. Switch between hot and cold in the shower.

Hot showers immediately warm you up, but cold showers improve blood circulation between your skin and organs.

5. Block drafts with a pool noodle.

Keep heat in and cold out by cutting a pool noodle in half lengthwise, wrapping it in fabric, and sliding it under your door. It’ll stay put all winter, and you can re-use it at the pool come summer. (But we recommend you spring for a new one.)

6. Two words: programmable thermostat.

Another two words: Obvious, right? Stay toasty on schedule, so you never go home to a living room that’s colder than outside. You can even do it with your smartphone.

7. Trick a locked thermostat.

Not everyone has access to adjust the thermostat in their apartment or office building. If that’s the case, you may need to outsmart the device by making it “think” the room is colder than it actually is. Putting ice near it often does the trick.

8. Dress your windows up in warmer clothes.

If you’re not wearing a tank top or going sleeveless, your windows shouldn’t, either. Replace thin curtains with heavier wool or fleece drapes in the winter. But be sure to open them on sunny days for free heat.

9. Go ahead, bake all day.

Using your oven heats up the whole house. You’ll feel even cozier if you invite friends—and all their body heat—over to eat four dozen cookies.

10. Start composting.

If you’re already interested in composting, here’s another reason to do it: The microbial breakdown of organic material produces heat. Some people use it to warm up showers and greenhouses, but even small-timers in studio apartments can feel a difference.

11. Layer your covers with the thinnest, densest ones on top.

It’s intuitive, but fluffy blankets should be closer to your skin. Thin, dense blankets should be on top to prevent convective heat loss. Bonus tip: Don’t put your bed directly against an exterior wall. You’ll be warmer if you leave a little space.

12. Stuff your coat pockets with DIY hand warmers.

You could just buy hand warmers, but you’ll radiate pride and self-sufficiency if you make them yourself. All it takes is two Ziploc bags, water, and calcium chloride ice melt pellets from the hardware store.

How to keep warm

Using these tips, you can stay warm no matter how frightful the cold weather outside gets.

1. When cold weather is on the way, warm yourself first.

It’s easier to change your body temperature than room temperature, not to mention more eco-friendly. Instead of turning up the heat, put on another layer of clothing.

2. Wear a hat made for cold weather.

Your mom may have said that you lose 80 percent of your body heat through your head, but that’s not actually true. If you’re otherwise clothed, you’ll lose heat from any surface that’s exposed in cold weather. So put on your hat, even if you’re inside.

3. Turn on the ceiling fan.

Warm air rises to the ceiling. Run your fan on its lowest setting in a clockwise direction to push the warm air back down to where you can feel it.

4. Switch between hot and cold in the shower.

Hot showers immediately warm you up, but cold showers improve blood circulation between your skin and organs.

5. Block drafts with a pool noodle.

Keep heat in and cold out by cutting a pool noodle in half lengthwise, wrapping it in fabric, and sliding it under your door. It’ll stay put all winter, and you can re-use it at the pool come summer. (But we recommend you spring for a new one.)

6. Two words: programmable thermostat.

Another two words: Obvious, right? Stay toasty on schedule, so you never go home to a living room that’s colder than outside. You can even do it with your smartphone.

7. Trick a locked thermostat.

Not everyone has access to adjust the thermostat in their apartment or office building. If that’s the case, you may need to outsmart the device by making it “think” the room is colder than it actually is. Putting ice near it often does the trick.

8. Dress your windows up in warmer clothes.

If you’re not wearing a tank top or going sleeveless, your windows shouldn’t, either. Replace thin curtains with heavier wool or fleece drapes in the winter. But be sure to open them on sunny days for free heat.

9. Go ahead, bake all day.

Using your oven heats up the whole house. You’ll feel even cozier if you invite friends—and all their body heat—over to eat four dozen cookies.

10. Start composting.

If you’re already interested in composting, here’s another reason to do it: The microbial breakdown of organic material produces heat. Some people use it to warm up showers and greenhouses, but even small-timers in studio apartments can feel a difference.

11. Layer your covers with the thinnest, densest ones on top.

It’s intuitive, but fluffy blankets should be closer to your skin. Thin, dense blankets should be on top to prevent convective heat loss. Bonus tip: Don’t put your bed directly against an exterior wall. You’ll be warmer if you leave a little space.

12. Stuff your coat pockets with DIY hand warmers.

You could just buy hand warmers, but you’ll radiate pride and self-sufficiency if you make them yourself. All it takes is two Ziploc bags, water, and calcium chloride ice melt pellets from the hardware store.

A good piece of fried chicken is perfect “company food.” It’s good enough in its own right to appeal to the most demanding of your foodie friends, but it’s comforting and down-home enough for everyone else too. You can even keep it tantalizingly hot and crispy – as long as you know what to do and what not to do.

Understand the Problem Clearly

You’ve probably heard the saying “No good deed goes unpunished.” That’s exactly what you’re up against when you try to keep fried chicken hot and crispy. If you’ve done your job properly, the chicken will be beautifully moist on the inside, and that’s why keeping it crispy is so hard. Juices will try to ooze from the chicken as it rests, making the bottom soggy, and hot steam trapped inside the chicken pieces will do the same everywhere else. That’s especially true if the chicken is covered. Your goal, then, is not just to keep the chicken hot but also to let it drain while allowing steam to dissipate.

Use a Low Oven

A low oven, set to about 200 F, is an ideal environment for keeping your chicken at a good serving temperature. There’s enough space for steam to evaporate without making your chicken soggy and enough heat to keep it crisp without overcooking it.

Your best bet is to line a sheet pan with foil or parchment – to make cleanup easier – and then set a wire rack on the pan. Arrange your chicken pieces on the rack with a bit of space between them so air can circulate and then slide the rack into your oven. Keep adding pieces as you take them out of the hot fat, until you’ve filled the pan. Use a second sheet for a really big batch rather than stacking the chicken in a second layer. If your oven has a convection mode, the fan will also help to keep the surface of the chicken crisp and dry.

Use a Toaster Oven

You can use the same basic technique if you have a toaster oven or small countertop oven. Most of these appliances will only hold four to eight pieces of chicken comfortably, but that’s plenty for a small group.

Note that there are a couple of potential issues with this approach: One is that the elements in toaster ovens are low, so you may need to slide a small square of foil over the chicken to keep it from scorching. As long as you don’t fold the foil down over the chicken, though, it shouldn’t trap too much steam. The other problem is finding a wire rack the right size to fit into the small roasting pan of the toaster oven. You might need to scour thrift stores and online vendors for a while to find one. Alternatively, some toaster ovens are designed so the pan slides right under the oven’s own rack. That works just fine.

Use a Roaster or Slow Cooker

A countertop roaster oven or slow cooker can also work well, though they’re not as good at circulating air around the chicken pieces. Still, as long as you keep your chicken pieces in a single layer, they can do the job. Heat the roaster to 200 F or the slow cooker to its high setting and find a wire rack that fits. In an oval slow cooker, you might need to use a square or rectangular rack in the middle and round ones at the ends.

Can’t find a rack to fit? Try scrunching foil into balls about the size of a golf ball and using them to fill the bottom of the roaster or slow cooker. They’ll work like a rack, allowing the chicken to drain and air to circulate. This isn’t as good as a rack, but it’s a useful hack. Don’t put the lid on the roaster or slow cooker, because that would trap steam. Instead, cover it with a clean kitchen towel.

Use a Chafing Dish

If you’re going to be serving in the backyard and you don’t want to run an extension cord out there, consider buying or renting a chafing dish. These come in various sizes and shapes, but the most useful are the big rectangular types that restaurants use. They burn gel fuel, and they’ll definitely create enough heat to keep your chicken hot.

Again, place a rack at the bottom to keep the underside of your chicken from getting soggy and don’t use the lid that comes with the dish. A clean kitchen towel is your friend here too. Be sure to use a towel that’s just big enough to cover the chicken, because if it’s long enough to hang over the edge, it’ll probably find its way to the gel flame sooner or later. And you want your guests to remember the chicken, not any unnecessary “excitement.”

How to keep warm

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The Viking culture-inspired survival game Valheim is brutal in punishing players who don’t respect the elements of nature. If you are not careful, the harsh cold tundra will leave you for dead. In our guide, we’ll tell you how you can try to stay warm in Valheim in the harshest cold in the mountains.

How to Stay Warm in Valheim

Any good survival game can be measured based on how it treats the weather elements and their effect on survival. Valheim is great in that regard and will punish players for not taking precautions against the cold.

Staying Warm in the Mountain Biome

The coldest weather conditions in Valheim are upon the mountains. That is not to say that the cold won’t kill you in other areas as well, just that the harshest areas of cold are the mountains.

The most effective way to fend off the cold, which also is quite obvious, is to get warm clothes. Wolf Armor is one of the craftable armor sets in the game and it provides excellent warmth.

Crafting Armors

The Wolf armor has two parts, the chest and the legs. Each part requires 20 Silver and 5 wolf pelts a piece, while the chest piece will additionally require 1 chain leather and 4 wolf fangs.

Another armor you can craft is the Lox Armor; these are made from reptile-like creatures found in the plains biomes.

Alternate ways to Prevent Cold

To get the silver needed to make warm armor, you need to climb and find it on the mountain. This creates the dilemma of staying warm long enough to find silver, but fear not, for there are alternate ways to keep yourself warm.

You can drink the Frost Resistance Mead, which can keep you warm for up to 10 minutes. To craft the mead, you must:

  • Have a cauldron to make it in (Craftable for 10 tin), and a fermenter below it (craft able with Bronze and Fine Wood from oak or birch).
  • Follow the recipe for it, you’ll need Blood Leeches, Thistle, Honey, etc. and pour it all in the cauldron.
  • Stick it into the fermenter and wait for it to be done, and you’ll have your warm mead.
  • Repeat as many times as you want it.

Another way is to get out of the open and find someplace to warm up before continuing your exploration. If that isn’t available, as will be the case often, you can lay down campfires to keep yourself warm.

The bonus is that you can use them as checkpoints as well. If you make a fire indoors, make sure to set it under a chimney, or you will die of smoke inhalation.

These steps should help you stay warm in Valheim, or in the most extreme cases like on mountains, should be enough for you to survive.

How to keep warm

Nobody wants to arrive at their holiday destination, only to realize that the brisket that you worked so hard on cooking has gotten cold on the drive over. This can leave you feeling at a loss as to what you should do, as microwaving it or putting it back into the oven is one of the worst choices you could make.

If you are planning to make a small trip and you want to take some brisket with you, there are a few different ways that you can keep the brisket warm so that it will be ready to serve by the time you arrive.

The main thing that you will want to focus on is insulating the brisket. When there is no way for the steam to escape with all the heat and moisture, brisket can actually retain its heat for a good eight to ten hours, depending on the surroundings and how well it has been packaged.

This means that, no matter how well you pack the brisket, it isn’t going to be able to last more than 10 hours in any type of storage.

With this in mind, you can begin preparing the materials you will need to keep your brisket nice, warm, and ready to serve. You are going to need a cooler, some towels, water, towels (blankets can work well), and several layers of heavy foil.

You are also going to want to make sure that the cooler you are putting the meat in can handle hot temperatures. Some coolers are designed only with cold temperatures in mind, and can crack and split when faced with very high temperatures.

Keeping Your Brisket Warm

How to keep warm

Now that you have all of the supplies that you need to keep your brisket warm, you can begin preparing everything. First things first, you are going to want to find a container so that you can boil some water.

While the water is boiling, you should wrap up your brisket in either plastic wrap or tin foil. You should always use at least a few layers of heavy foil, especially if you are trying to keep it warm for longer periods of time.

From here, you will want to wrap the tin foil-covered brisket in either towels or blankets. This will help a lot with insulating the heat and making sure that it won’t leave the brisket at all whatsoever.

By now, the water should have boiled. You will want to pour the hot water into the cooler to make sure that it is properly warmed. Now, you can place the brisket into the water, inside the cooler.

If you want to get particularly specific about just how hot your brisket is, you can always consider getting a remote thermometer. You should always make sure that it doesn’t dip below 140 degrees.

If you want to make sure that there is next to no chance of this happening, you can fill up the rest of the air space in the cooler with even more towels and blankets. This should keep your brisket nice and warm for up to 10 hours.

Before you know it, you will have brisket that is ready to be served, no matter how long you need to wait. For a few other methods on how to keep meat like brisket, Boston butts or ribs check out how to here.

Tips When Cooking in Stages

How to keep warm

Whether it is a weekend morning and you’re making batches of pancakes, or cooking up several dishes for a holiday dinner, finding a way to keep the food warm is often a necessity. Luckily, there are several different methods available in your own kitchen to keep that French toast, deep-fried food, and even mashed potatoes from turning cold.

An important thing to keep in mind is that food that is kept out and not kept adequately warm or cool (lower than 40 F or higher than 150 F) may be dangerous to consume. Keep a thermometer handy to check food temps.

Your Oven

Some ovens actually will have a “warm” setting, which is usually 170 to 200 F, or a warming drawer, which is meant to keep foods at a level, warm temperature. If your oven has neither, set it to 200 to 250 F. Transfer the cooked food to a baking sheet, an oven-safe saucepan, or a baking dish and cover with aluminum foil before placing in the oven.

If you are trying to keep batches of pancakes, waffles, fritters, or any deep-fried items warm, place them in a single layer on a cooling rack set over a baking sheet to prevent them from getting soggy or soft. You may also want to loosely cover with foil to prevent the outside from browning any further.

For food that must be kept warm for more than 15 or 20 minutes, check with an instant-read thermometer to be sure it is at least 140 F; if it is not, then increase the oven temperature a little. Keep in mind that if you try to keep the food warm for more than an hour or two, the texture of the food may become spongy or the flavor profile might change. Consider reheating closer to serving time instead.

Slow Cooker or Chafing Dishes

For hot vegetables, sauces, stews, and soups, a slow cooker or chafing dish may be used on the low setting to keep the food warm. Similar to an oven, if you plan to store foods for longer than an hour, you may notice a change in texture or taste. Although the appliance is set to warm, the food may continue to slow cook to a slight degree.

Rice Cooker and Other Steam-Based Cookers

If you use a rice cooker to make rice, then the rice will most likely stay hot and moist for an hour or more while on its on the “warm” setting. If you are using a steaming method of cooking, you can usually keep a food warm if you remove the heating element from the steam cooker (remove it from the stovetop or turn off the electric steamer) and put the cooking vessel aside. You might want to open the lid for a quick moment to let the steam escape so the food does not continue to cook. Replace the lid and set the cooker aside until ready to serve.

Cooler or Insulated Bag

We may think of using our cooler or insulated shopping bag when transporting food that needs to be kept cold, but both are also great at keeping foods warm. If the food is not in a covered dish, transfer to a covered container or wrap in aluminum foil and store in the cooler or bag. Check the temperature of the food every once in a while to make sure it doesn’t dip below 140 F.

Warm Plates for Serving

If there isn’t a lot of time between when the food is done and when you’re going to serve it, but enough time for the food to cool down slightly, heating the plates the food will be served on is a solution. Make sure your plates are oven-safe—ceramic plates maintain heat nicely.

To warm plates for serving, stack them in an oven for 15 minutes at the lowest oven temperature, like 150 to 200 F. You could also use a warming drawer or toaster oven, if large enough. Alternatively, you can warm the plates in the microwave for one to two minutes. If you do a lot of entertaining, you might want to invest in an electric plate warmer.

If you warm plates in the oven, make sure you use an oven mitt at all times, inform others that the plate is hot, and do not shock the plate by putting it in a cold place like a refrigerator. The thermal shock from hot to cold can cause the plate to break.

Aluminum Foil

If you need to keep food warm for the short-term, wrapping or covering with aluminum foil will do the trick. Just keep in mind the foil will keep in the heat for only about 30 minutes or so.

If you are trying to keep a roast, steak, or whole bird warm, tenting with aluminum foil while it rests will benefit the meat in two ways: It will keep it at a warm temperature while allowing the juices to redistribute. Just make sure you cover it loosely with foil; if you cover it tightly, you will make the hot meat sweat and lose the valuable moisture you are trying to retain. A roast is best when rested for 10 to 20 minutes before carving, but resting time will depend on its size. A turkey can sit from 20 to 45 minutes, depending on the size of the bird (the larger the bird, the longer the resting time). Steaks or chops should stand, tented in foil, for 5 minutes before serving.