How to make saudi champagne

Making wine in a nutshell

My white wine was finally done yesterday!

When you live in Saudi, you probably know, that making your own wine is one of the rare possibilities to get something to drink. The good thing about Saudi on the opposite side is: Large supermarkets such as Carrefour and Panda are equipped in a way, that getting your stuff together for your wine is simple as 123. I think they know, why funnels and grape juice are among their best selling products. 😉

What you need for your wine

You just need yeast, sugar and some fruit juice. Take an empty 5-liter water-can and fill it with about 4 liters of grape juice, red or white, up2u. add about 300 grams of sugar and mix it so sugar and juice are fully bound. Put a tea-spoon of yeast in a glass with 37°-warm water and wait 5 minutes until the yeast breaks open and merges with the water. Add this mix to the wine aswell. That was the easy part.

Cutting off the yeast’s oxygen supply

To make the yeast convert sugar to alcohol, you need to cut off the oxygen supply; meanwhile the yeast is producing large quantities of CO2 when converting sugar to alcohol; so if you just close the bottle to cut off oxygen supply, it will explode within one or two days. To let the CO2 out of the bottle, but oxygen not enter the bottle, you can buy either one of those fancy ventils, that let gas out but not in (not available in Saudi, cause everybody knows what you’re gonna do with it) or you have to build this on your own. To do this, you need to put a straw through a hole in the cap of the bottle and place the end of this straw in water. Seal the hole around the straw with silicon or candle wax, so the only way for gas out of and into the bottle is through the straw. Now with CO2 produced by the yeast building overpressure in the bottle, the CO2 will pass off from the bottle through the water the end of the straw is hanging in. But at the same time, no oxygen can enter the bottle. Voilà. I’ll post a foto of this construction as soon as I’m at home tonight; I’m not sure whether it’s understandable without this… 😉

Now sit and wait… but in 2 weeks it’s done

If everything went right, about 12-24h later the CO2 will start to escape through the straw and “bubble” into the water. About 10-14 days later this bubbling will stop and all sugar is converted to alcohol. If you’re not in Saudi and have the time to wait because you can easily buy something around the corner instead of taking your own wine, winemaking.com recommends to wait another 6-12 months. If you don’t have this time, you can leave the bottle for 24h in the fridge so the yeast sets off to the bottom of the bottle. Pouring the wine in another bottle now will leave most of the yeast in the first bottle; you can now filter the wine again through a coffee filter or a towel, but this won’t really change the result anymore. You’re now the proud owner of your first “Federweisser”, not yet a young wine, but a fermented grape must, good for about 8-10% of alcohol.

Now if you have any additional hints on improving or easy the method of making wine, please let me know. Cheers!

How to make saudi champagne

Saudi Champagne is probably one of the most popular and trending drinks here in Saudi Arabia. Its one of the best non alcoholic beverages out there. Made with apple juice and soda, it has just the right amount of tang and sweetness in it. It is one of those refreshing drinks that makes your day.

The first time I had it, was back in 2016, when I had first moved to Jeddah. I was INSTANTLY taken by it and ever since then, it has become my go to drink to order in Restaurants. It is usually served in Arabian, Turkish and Lebanese restaurants all over in Saudi Arabia. I usually write long posts explaining each step of a recipe as I go, but this is so straight forward, there really isn’t anything to explain. Just drive right in the recipe card.

P.s. Skip the soda and make this an absolutely perfect healthy drink to give to your kids or guests in the next party you host.

p.p.s. I love pairing Saudi Champagne with my chili parm nuggets and have an evening chill.

MAKING SAUDI CHAMPAGNE

How to make saudi champagne

Saudi Champagne

A fine non alcoholic Beverage, made by apple juice, soda and sparkling water.

Ingredients

  • 1 Liter of apple juice (fresh or boxed)
  • 0.5 Liter of sparkling water
  • 1 can or 330 ml of White Soda (7 up or sprite)
  • 1 apple sliced thinly
  • 1 orange cut up in slices
  • A handful of mint leaves
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • A tray of ice cubes

Instructions

1. In a large pitcher, add sliced oranges, mint leaves and apple slices. Squeeze lemon juice all over it,

2. Add in the ice cubes and pour apple juice first.

3. Pour in the sparkling water and soda. Stir around.

4. Serve immediately.

Notes

You can substitute sparkling water with white soda and vice versa

2 – Didn’t like it

This popular Hawaiian snack of soy-and-sugar-glazed Spam and sushi rice wrapped in nori is totally addictive. Cook Allison Robicelli admits that she had hesitations about trying it, but now it’s one of her favorites. “It’s ridiculous how we have a national aversion to Spam. Shoulder is the best part of the pig, in my opinion,” she says. Slideshow: More Hawaiian Recipes

By Allison Robicelli

Gallery

Recipe Summary

Ingredients

In a small saucepan, cover the rice with 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons of water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer over low heat for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand covered for 20 minutes.

In a small microwavable bowl, combine the vinegar with the granulated sugar; microwave until warm, about 20 seconds. Stir to dissolve the sugar. Pour the vinegar mixture over the rice and toss to combine.

In another small bowl, stir the soy sauce with the brown sugar and ¼ cup of water. In a large nonstick skillet, heat the oil. Add the Spam slices and cook over high heat, turning once, until browned, about 4 minutes. Add the soy sauce mixture to the skillet and cook over moderate heat, turning the slices once, until the Spam is glazed, about 3 minutes.

On a work surface, arrange a half sheet of nori with the longer side facing you. Set the cleaned Spam can upright in the center of the nori sheet. Spoon 3 tablespoons of the warm sushi rice into the bottom of the can. Using the back of a spoon that’s been dipped in cold water, pack the rice in an even layer. Top with 1 slice of Spam and sprinkle with ¼ teaspoon of the furikake. Spoon another 3 tablespoons of the rice over the Spam and pack in an even layer. Carefully hold down the musubi and remove the Spam can, leaving the musubi on the nori. Fold one end of the nori up over the rice. Using your fingertips, wet the other end of the nori and fold it up over the other side of the rice, pressing to adhere. Flip the musubi so it is seam side down. Repeat with the remaining nori sheets, rice, Spam and furikake.

Using a moistened sharp knife, cut each roll crosswise into 4 pieces, wiping the knife with a damp towel between slices. Arrange the musubi on a platter and serve.

Make Ahead

The musubi can be refrigerated overnight. It’s best eaten at room temperature You can also use a Spam musubi maker.

Notes

You will need the Spam can for this recipe. Using a can opener, remove both the top and the bottom of the can and remove the Spam. Use a spoon to push down any sharp edges on the side of the can. Wash and dry the can well before proceeding.

An Expat Blog | Reviews-Reflections-Recipes

So after earnest requests made by few of my friends, I decided to share the secret recipe of preparing the heavenly Saudi Champagne which I successfully made at home last evening. 😀
Before I give out the recipe, let me familiarize you a bit with this awesome cool beverage.
Saudi Champagne certainly does NOT contain alcohol, therefore it’s referred to as “Saudi” but does have sparkly nature of the real champagne.. How ironic right? However, this minty and fruity flavored drink is healthier and a much more refreshing substitute to any soft drink.

It is one of the most popular refreshments which is offered in the menu of every renowned restaurants and hotels in the Kingdom. A pitcher could be charged to you with an extravagant price.. but guess what? Saudi Champagne is NO biggy to make it on your own, it is VERY simple and quick to make at home!

Here is what you need to make a pitcher (4 glasses) :

  • 900 ml – chilled apple juice (a good brand)
  • 250 ml – chilled sparkling water / Perrier water ( for stronger drink, increase the amount)
  • 1 Apple – diced into little square pieces
  • 1/2 Orange or Lemon – sliced horizontally into perfect rounds
  • few sprigs of mint leaves
  • ice cubes

Preparation:

  • In a pitcher, add the fruits along with the mint leaves
  • Pour in apple juice… stir… the fruits will rise up and float
  • Mix in sparkling water
  • Throw in some ice cubes
  • Serve immediately and enjoyyyyy! 😀

Hope those of you who asked for it are happy now 😀
And the rest of you.. please do try it out and let me know how it turned out! ^_^

Help Support Wine Making Talk:

jhowe

Junior

I need some advice from you experienced wine makers. I work in Saudi Arabia and have been making wine for about two years here. Its not bad, but I now want to take my wine making to the next step.

Equipment and supplies, as you can imagine, are hard to acquire, but we manage. I have Red Star Wine Yeast, Potassium Sorbate, a clarifier, and Campdon tablets. Also have rubber stopper and airlock.

Here is the process I use to make red and white wine:

1. 16 cartons of 100% grape juice (1 liter each)
2. 2 cartons on the stove, add 2 jars of grape jelly, and 2 cups of sugar, dissolve.
3. 4 cups of water and 4 tea bags on stove, steep.
4. 14 cartons of juice in 5 gallon water container (5 Campdon tablets 24 hours prior)
5. Add 2 cartons from stove and steeped tea to 5 gallon container.
6. Activate yeast in small amount of water then add to 5 gallon container.
7. Stir juice for one minute, add rubber stopper and airlock.

I let the juice ferment for two weeks. I rack the juice into another 5 gallon container and add 2 teaspoons of Potassium Sorbate, let stand for an additional two weeks. The last two days I add 1 tablespoon of the clarifier. I then rack to bottles.

We drink the wine right after racking to the bottles, and its good, some will sit for a few more weeks.

What am I doing wrong or what can I do better. Help.

Julie

Super Moderator

MN-winer

Senior Member

winemaker_3352

Senior Member

Dirtydog420

Senior Member

Overall it seems your process is right on.. to make it better you can let it age longer in the carboys to make sure all your sugar is gone or at a sweetness you like. Get a hydrometer. This is one of the most basic things needed. Id also wait longer before stabilizing. This will let the yeast add more characteristics to the wine. Keep records of everything you do, try something different and see if you like the results better.

To really take it to the next level you will need some more equipment, and you need to give it time.. It general takes a year from date yeast is pitched for it to reach its prime. That’s about 6 months in carboy and 6 months in bottle, more or less..

jhowe

Junior

Thanks all for the advice and encouragement. The wine making is a labor of love, always trying to make it better with less. Will definitely try and acquire a hydrometer on the next vacation out of Saudi. You’ll have to teach me how to use the thing

robie

Senior Member

Dirtydog420

Senior Member

Franziskaner

Junior

I need some advice from you experienced wine makers. I work in Saudi Arabia and have been making wine for about two years here. Its not bad, but I now want to take my wine making to the next step.

Equipment and supplies, as you can imagine, are hard to acquire, but we manage. I have Red Star Wine Yeast, Potassium Sorbate, a clarifier, and Campdon tablets. Also have rubber stopper and airlock.

Here is the process I use to make red and white wine:

1. 16 cartons of 100% grape juice (1 liter each)
2. 2 cartons on the stove, add 2 jars of grape jelly, and 2 cups of sugar, dissolve.
3. 4 cups of water and 4 tea bags on stove, steep.
4. 14 cartons of juice in 5 gallon water container (5 Campdon tablets 24 hours prior)
5. Add 2 cartons from stove and steeped tea to 5 gallon container.
6. Activate yeast in small amount of water then add to 5 gallon container.
7. Stir juice for one minute, add rubber stopper and airlock.

I let the juice ferment for two weeks. I rack the juice into another 5 gallon container and add 2 teaspoons of Potassium Sorbate, let stand for an additional two weeks. The last two days I add 1 tablespoon of the clarifier. I then rack to bottles.

We drink the wine right after racking to the bottles, and its good, some will sit for a few more weeks.

What am I doing wrong or what can I do better. Help.

A blog commenting on events in Saudi Arabia which have either been personally experienced by the author or published in the Saudi press. Basically, anything to do with Saudi Arabia is fair game!

Wednesday, October 04, 2006

Alcohol in Saudi Arabia

I first came to Saudi Arabia on a 3-day “look see” visit before accepting the job offer from my current employer. On the very first day here two British soon-to-be colleagues took me to a pub at lunchtime for a pint of beer. True, the beer was home made and the “pub” was an illegal bar, but the beer was real nonetheless.

It is well-know that alcohol is illegal in Saudi Arabia . What is less well know is how much alcohol is produced and consumed in this country. It is a veritable cottage industry.

There are those who come to Saudi with the attitude that alcohol is against the law here and while they are, in effect, guests in this country, they will respect the local laws and customs. Others feel differently – for them there are many opportunities to obtain and drink various types of alcoholic drink.

One of the first things you come across when you came to live in Saudi Arabia is “sid”. This is short for “siddiqi” which is arabic for “my friend”. “Sid” is a locally distilled spirit. A one gallon jar of “un-cut” sid can be bought for about 300-400 riyals (GBP 50-60). Since this “un-cut” sid needs to be diluted one part of sid to one or two parts of water, one gallon of un-cut sid will go a long way. Sid is usually drunk with a mixer such as coca-cola or tonic. Personally, I don’t like it – I think it smells like paintbrush cleaner!

Un-cut sid is extremely powerful and dangerous. I heard a story about a woman who came out to Saudi to join her husband. Shortly after she arrived, some friends came to visit while her husband was out. Being polite she offered them a drink and they asked for a sid and coke. Unfortunately, the sid she severed them was un-cut: it took the guests three days to recover from alcohol poisoning. The woman’s husband was extremely angry with her, although it seems to me that it was not her fault.

Many people brew their own wine. It is easy to do – all you need is grape juice, sugar and yeast. Mind you the results are very variable. If you are invited round to someone’s house for a drink and you ask for wine, you are playing Russian Roulette. You may be served something acceptable or it may be absolutely disgusting – and you have to drink it out of politeness.

Very few people brew beer; it’s a little bit more complicated than wine. However, most of the bars serve beer; it’s obviously home-made and, for me, it’s an acquired taste. One of the wives on a compound where I used to live brewed some excellent beer. Unfortunately, she returned to the UK before I could get the recipe from her.

Bottles of real spirits can also be bought on the black market. Last time I enquired, the price was 450 riyals (GBP 70) a bottle. A bit too expensive for me and, anyway, I’m not too fond of spirits.

An friend of mine told me that he once met a sales representative for a well-known brand of whiskey out here. My friend asked what he was doing here since there wasn’t much of a market for his product out here. “On the contrary” replied the rep, “this is one of our biggest markets”!

You way be wondering how the spirits are smuggled into Saudi. One way is by passing ships dropping a consignment overboard and a Saudi fishing boat coming along and picking it up later.

Smugglers are, of course, noted for their ingenuity. A few years ago there was some “excitement” in the city of Al Khobar , over on the Gulf coast and a British ex-pat had to leave the country in a hurry. Apparently, whiskey was being smuggled over the Saudi-Bahrain causeway on a Coca-Cola truck. Unfortunately, one day the driver gave the bribe to the wrong customs officer!

Another story I’ve heard is about a Saudi prince who landed in his private jet, with his entourage, at an airport in one of the other Gulf countries. Normally, the planes belonging to members of other royal families are not searched out of courtesy. However, for some reason this plane was searched and guess what they found – crates and crates of whiskey and other spirits!

Because there is little entertainment available in Saudi some people do end up drinking more than is good for them. One last story, which may be another myth. A UK company had an employee who had a serious drinking problem. Since Saudi Arabia is nominally “dry” they thought they could help him by sending him to work in their Saudi office. Unfortunately, he ended up being returned to the UK suffering from cirrhosis of the liver!

How to make saudi champagne

Newsflash: It’s almost Valentine’s Day. Still trying to think of ways to woo your boo? Listen up, guys. Here’s what you need to do. First, pop a bottle of bubbly. Next, whip up a batch of Champagne Marshmallows. Finally, serve said marshmallows with more bubbly and fresh strawberries. Sound good? Okay, let’s get cooking!

How to make saudi champagne

Ingredients:
– 3 tablespoons unflavored gelatin
– 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
– 1 cup cold pink champagne or sparkling wine
– 1 3/4 cups granulated sugar
– 3/4 cup light corn syrup
– 2 egg whites
– powdered sugar, for dusting

Instructions:
1. Coat a 9×13-inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a small bowl, whisk together the gelatin, vanilla, and 1/2 cup cold champagne. Let sit for 5 minutes.
2. Whip the egg whites until they hold stiff peaks. Set aside in a small bowl.
3. In a medium saucepan, stir together the granulated sugar, corn syrup, and remaining 1/2 cup champagne. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of your pan. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally, until the thermometer registers 240 degrees F.
4. Pour the gelatin mixture into the bowl of a standing electric mixer. Slowly pour the hot sugar mixture over the gelatin mixture. Beat on high until the mixture has nearly tripled in size, 6-8 minutes. Beat egg whites into sugar and gelatin mixture until combined.
5. Pour into baking pan. Dust with powdered sugar. Chill uncovered until firm, 2-3 hours.
6. Cut into squares. Roll in powdered sugar. Enjoy!

How to make saudi champagne

Coat a 9×13-inch baking pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a small bowl, whisk together the gelatin, vanilla, and 1/2 cup cold champagne. Let sit for 5 minutes.

How to make saudi champagne

Whip the egg whites until they hold stiff peaks. Set aside in a small bowl.

How to make saudi champagne

In a medium saucepan, stir together the granulated sugar, corn syrup, and remaining 1/2 cup champagne. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of your pan. Bring the mixture to a boil, stirring occasionally, until the thermometer registers 240 degrees F.

How to make saudi champagne

Pour the gelatin mixture into the bowl of a standing electric mixer. Slowly pour the hot sugar mixture over the gelatin mixture. Beat on high until the mixture has nearly tripled in size, 6-8 minutes. Beat egg whites into sugar and gelatin mixture until combined.

How to make saudi champagne

Pour into baking pan.

How to make saudi champagne

Dust with powdered sugar. Chill uncovered until firm, 2-3 hours.

How to make saudi champagne

Cut into squares.

How to make saudi champagne

Roll in powdered sugar.

How to make saudi champagne

These light and fluffy marshmallows are a dream on their own (or in a cup of cocoa, duh).

How to make saudi champagne

Or, you can serve them up with strawberries and champagne. How good does THAT look?

Add some sparkle to your next party with our tasty champagne cocktail recipes. From bellinis to summery spritzes, we have a drink for every occasion.

How to make saudi champagne

Raspberry fizz

Serve this fruity cocktail at a garden party or wedding reception. With crushed fresh raspberries, raspberry liqueur and champagne, it’s a real taste of summer

How to make saudi champagne

Champagne cocktail

Blend some chilled champagne with brandy and bitters for a sophisticated champagne cocktail. Garnish with an orange twist to serve

How to make saudi champagne

Elderflower & champagne cocktail

Mix elderflower cordial, gin, lychee juice and lemon bitters with chilled champagne to make this superb cocktail that tastes like summer all year round

How to make saudi champagne

Champagne mojito

If you love mojitos and champagne, this will be the cocktail of your dreams. Combine rum, mint, sugar syrup and Angostura bitters and top it up with champers

How to make saudi champagne

Porter & champagne

Combine porter or light stout with champagne to make this unusual cocktail. Similar to a Black Velvet, it’s rich and decadent – perfect to impress party guests

How to make saudi champagne

Sloe royales

The berry sweetness of sloe gin perks up this fizz cocktail – use Prosecco or Champagne, and edible glitter for extra sparkle

How to make saudi champagne

Aperitivo spritz

Love pre-dinner cocktails? Serve the perfect aperitif by blending Aperol or Campari with sparkling water and a generous amount of your favourite champagne

How to make saudi champagne

Spice 75

This is a sophisticated, aromatic twist on the classic French 75, to get it ready for the festive season. A boozy taste of Christmas in a glass

How to make saudi champagne

Kir royale

Make a classic kir royale cocktail with crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) and your favourite champagne. Garnish with a blackberry to serve to guests

How to make saudi champagne

Mango bellini

Blend fresh fruit with champagne to make this fabulous mango bellini. It’s great as a summer cocktail or a dinner party aperitif, or alongside a weekend brunch

How to make saudi champagne

Mimosa

Mix a classic mimosa cocktail with orange juice and champagne – or use prosecco if you prefer a different sort of bubbly. It’s an easy fix when entertaining

How to make saudi champagne

Blood orange & star anise fizz

The perfect zesty tipple for a spring celebration. Who could resist a blend of sharp blood orange, star anise and Grand Marnier, topped with bubbles?