How to moisturize african hair

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How to moisturize african hair

Natural Hair NEEDS Moisture, Moisture, & More Moisture.

I really can’t emphasis the importance of moisturizing enough.

Your moisturizing routine or lack thereof can literally make or break your hair.

Your hair needs moisture. And water equals moisture.

In the past, we have been taught that water makes our hair dry and brittle. Now we know, that is so false. Your hair needs water.

Read all 10 Ways to Add More Moisture to Your Hair Below.

1. Shampoo your hair. No matter your method (meaning whether you’re using a shampoo bar, cleansing cream or some other gentle sulfate-free product), keep your hair clean. Although it seems counterproductive — since the wash process can be drying — shampooing your hair removes product buildup that prevents products from penetrating your hair shaft.

If your efforts to add moisture to your hair seem in vain, then it may be time for a shampooing session. Your products may simply be sitting on top of your hair, rather than moisturizing it.

2. Pre-poo your hair. If your hair feels excessively dry during the wash process, then consider pre-pooing your hair with an oil of your choice. Coconut oil is a great option for pre-pooing hair since it reduces protein loss that occurs during the wash process.

3. Co-wash your hair. Does your hair feel excessively dry in between shampoos? Need an extra boost of moisture? Then try co-washing your hair for that extra boost. Many times, if your hair is very dry, the only way to regain moisture is for it to be soaked in water. The important thing is to seal in that moisture with an oil or butter like shea butter.

How to moisturize african hair4. Steam your hair. Don’t want to co-wash your hair mid-week? Consider steaming your hair. The QRedew Handheld Steamer is a great way to steam your hair on the go.

Another option is to steam your hair in the shower. Steaming your hair is a great way to lift the hair cuticle so that products can better penetrate the hair. Furthermore, steaming is much less wear and tear on your hair than co-washing your hair.

5. Deep condition your hair. If you’ve been skipping the deep conditioning portion of your wash, then it’s time to add this important step back to your hair regimen.

For even better results, use indirect heat so that the conditioner can better penetrate the hair. When selecting a conditioner, pick one that specifically states “deep conditioner” or “conditioning masque” on the bottle.

These conditioners are specifically designed for deep conditioning. Here’s a list of our 5 Favorite Deep Conditioners.

[irp posts=”21649″ name=”10 Best Deep Conditioners for Your Natural Hair”]

6. Use the LOC (Liquid-Oil-Cream) method to moisturize your hair. In this method, the water moisturizes your hair, the oil helps your hair hold onto the water molecules, and the cream locks in the moisture. For more information about the LOC Method, read LOC Method for Natural Hair.

7. Use a water-based moisturizer. Water is the key to moisture. So, no, grease will not moisturize your hair. Instead, find a daily moisturizer where the first ingredient is water or make your own with these 5 DIY Moisturizing Sprays.

If you like products like shea butters and oils, remember to spritz your hair with water then seal in that moisture using the LOC method described above.

8. Don’t be afraid of water. I know I just mentioned it, but it’s worth repeating. With a relaxer, water is not your friend.

But with natural hair, water is your best friend. Yes, humidity, will frizz out your hair. Rain will ruin your blow out.

In time, you will learn the tricks for styling your hair under these conditions. But while you figure it out, don’t forget that water is still your friend.

9. Drink water! Healthy hair begins with a healthy diet. And since our bodies is over 80% water and is needed to for almost every bodily function, you shouldn’t forget to drink it. Drinking water and eating a healthy diet are much more effective at growing healthy hair than any vitamin.

10. Pay attention to your hair’s moisture. If your hair feels dry and brittle, make sure that you’re properly moisturizing your hair. If your hair feels limp and lifeless, then your hair may actually over-moisturized. [It’s possible.]

Constantly assess your hair needs and act accordingly. Don’t wait until major breakage occurs before you act.

So there you have it! 10 tips for moisturized hair. Tell us in the Comment Section below

How to moisturize african hair

We’ll be the first to admit, the moisturizers on this list are not ideal for creating perfectly-formed curls, but they’re just what you want when your hair needs any kind of boost of moisture. Add the amount you need when styling your hair for the day, paying extra attention to the ends. You can use them on both natural and straight hair, and they range in price, so even the most budget-conscious can find something that works for them.

Shea Butter

How to moisturize african hair

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On its own, shea butter isn’t the easiest ingredient to use. With a little bit of work, though, you can take raw shea butter and transform it into a product that works head to toe. Mix it with a carrier oil like coconut or jojoba, and it becomes a spreadable butter that will melts into hair and skin. Because it’s so good at locking in moisture, you’ll find it as one of the main ingredients in plenty of products at your local store. However, you can purchase it on its own and concoct a mixture in your kitchen, including only ingredients you like in the mix. When you’re ready to apply it, warm it between your palms. The mixture melts instantly, making it absorb particularly well into hair, whatever that texture may be. However, it is heavy—relaxed ladies may want to focus it only on their ends in order to not weigh down their entire style.

Carol’s Daughter Hair Milk

Carol’s Daughter is one of the few brands that has been providing consumers with a range of great products for all different hair textures for years. The Hair Milk remains a perennial favorite. It’s lightweight, but a little does go a long way. Work a small amount into your ends daily, and you won’t have to worry about this small section of your tresses becoming dried out and brittle. It’s a little on the oily side, though, so anyone who doesn’t like that feeling may not be a fan. But even a dime-size dab provides some sheen and works on flyaway hair, if that’s what you’re after.

Shea Radiance Nourishing Hair Repair Cream

This moisturizer works wonderfully for women who don’t want their tresses weighed down. Full of yummy stuff like shea butter, avocado oil and softening humectants, smooth it over your hair while damp or dry. It adds just the right amount of weight for taming natural curls while still allowing them to bounce freely. Smooth this over a ponytail, dabbing a bit extra on the ends, and your hair remains soft and moisturized all day.

Elasta QP Olive Oil & Mango Butter Moisturizer

How to moisturize african hair

It smells good, is inexpensive and easy to find. While some women find that it seems to work better on straightened hair instead of natural curls, you can experiment to see how well it works for you. At such an affordable price point, it may be worth trying it out. Touted for thermal styling, this is a good product whether you use a flat/curling iron or not.

ORS Olive Oil Moisturizing Hair Lotion

How to moisturize african hair

Inexpensive and available everywhere from beauty supply stores to discount retailers, this product gets raves for being perfect for budget-conscious product junkies. Great ingredients in it include coconut, safflower, castor and olive oils. Yes, it does contain petrolatum, which is usually on a list of no-nos for Black hair. If petrolatum is a deal-breaker for you, then avoid this one, but fans of this product generally don’t get the buildup so common to other petroleum-containing lotions. Also on the plus side is the light fragrance.

Easy ways to hydrate moisture-starved natural hair

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Natural hair has its virtues. It’s free of harmful chemical processes and can be easier to maintain. But giving your fragile natural hair the moisture it so desperately needs can be a challenge.

Depending on your hair’s curl pattern and texture, it can be difficult to keep natural tresses hydrated. Although the hair follicles of African-American hair actually produce plenty of sebum, the oil is not evenly distributed. With tightly coiled or spiral-shaped hair follicles, it’s often harder for natural oils from the scalp to travel down the hair shaft. Plus, the porosity of natural hair can affect how well it absorbs and retains the moisture that’s so vital for the health and elasticity of your strands.

To keep natural tresses healthy, soft and supple, follow these simple rules:

Use water-based hair products

Begin with water-based moisturizers. These products will list water as the first ingredient.

Mist to add moisture

If hair is especially dry, spritz with a misting spray or plain water, making sure not to soak tresses. Be sure to moisturize the hair before applying oils, as this prevents moisture from penetrating the hair strands.

Oil to seal in the moisture

Make this the last step or the water will evaporate and really dry the hair. Don’t seal your hair with a water-based moisturizer because the liquid in it will also evaporate and tresses will eventually appear dry; use an oil, such as jojoba.

Deep-condition

This step helps hair to retain moisture and assists moisturizers, oils and ointments in penetrating the strands. Use a butter-based product, such as shea butter or a moisturizing cream or soufflé. To avoid product buildup, apply conditioner to hair only, not the scalp. Cover with a plastic cap and sit under a hooded dryer or keep on overnight.

Use a hair steamer

This nifty appliance opens up the cuticles and allows products to be absorbed by the hair to hydrate thirsty strands. When paired with a conditioner, the steamer helps the product penetrate your tresses.

Pre-poo

It’s what you do before you shampoo. Coat the hair from root to tip with natural oil to add moisture prior to washing to stop breakage, help with detangling and make hair easier to manage during cleansing. Try coconut, avocado or olive oils, as they work well to penetrate the hair shaft.

Co-wash

Co-washing (using only conditioner, no shampoo) is another method to decrease the dryness that can be caused by washing the hair. Washing hair with a conditioner instead of shampoo is gentler on natural hair and won’t strip your mane of natural oils.

Opt for gentle products

Avoid sulfate shampoos, which dry hair, and products with alcohol, mineral oil and petroleum oil, which are actually sealants and also dry out the hair.

Nourish tresses from the inside out

Eat a well-balanced whole-foods diet containing healthy protein, omega-3s, vitamin A (beta-carotene), vitamin B complex, vitamins C and E and minerals, such as iron, selenium, copper, silicon sulfur and zinc. And be sure to keep your body hydrated by drinking plenty of fresh water.

Make It Moist

Drink water and spritz it on hair to soften and hydrate tresses.

Just like the body, hair needs water to maintain healthy strands. When it comes to naturally moisturizing hair, this precious liquid is second only to sebum. Hair needs water to help maintain elasticity and stretch without breaking off, which can easily happen when you manipulate breakage-prone natural hair with styling and washing.

But liquids alone don’t hydrate hair. In fact, without applying a moisturizer, water can cause dryness because upon its evaporation, the hair dries and moisture can drain from the outer layer (cortex).

Although water is ideal for misting protective styles, hair can be affected by the type of water in your area. Hard water, for example, has a high mineral content, which makes it difficult to work with. Hard water can make it tricky to rinse away shampoo and other products.

One solution is to invest in a water purification system. Another is to use purified or distilled water to rinse the hair after shampooing. In addition, chelating, or clarifying, shampoos can help remove hard-water deposits.

As an alternative, try a weak apple cider vinegar hair rinse once a month. Add two tablespoons to 16 ounces of distilled or filtered water. Let sit for one to two minutes and rinse thoroughly.

Finally, drink up! Water flushes out toxins, helps hydrate the body and regulate the circulatory system, and delivers nutrients and moisture to the hair follicles.

Besides hair growth, moisture is by far the number one area women struggle with in terms of their natural hair. If you are a new natural or in the process of transitioning, this may come as a shock to you but, it is OK to moisturize your hair every day. This does not mean shampooing and conditioning every day but, pure and simple moisture. Moisturized hair will lead to less breakage, greater lengthen retention, easier manageability, softer hair and so forth. The confusion comes into play when women THINK they are moisturizing their hair but, the hair is still dry and brittle. The common thing I hear is “I put tons of coconut oil in my hair so it’s moisturized.” Unfortunately, that will only lead to a head full of oily hair and clogged pores. If you constantly put coconut oil on your hair only to discover your scalp is itchy and the hair is brittle, there is no hydration in your regimen. Remember: oils do not moisturize. If you want to achieve moisturized natural hair here are 7 things you must start doing TODAY.

7 Ways to Get Moisturized Natural Hair

1. Increase Moisturizing Frequency (Morning, noon & night)

Moisturizing your hair once is the morning may not be enough. Curly hair is naturally prone to be drier than other textures because the sebum has to work 3 times as hard to get from our root to ends due to all the curves along the strand. Use a daily moisturizing lotion in the morning and gently mist your hair with water at night. My favorite is Hydratherma Naturals Daily Growth Moisturizing Lotion. If your hair also feels dry by mid-day, using a refresher spray like the Obia Natural Hair Curl Hydration Spray as well. The main take-away is moisturizing once or twice a week isn’t going to do the trick. You must moisturize daily and even multiple times a day if needed.

2. Change Your Deep Conditioning Regimen

Deep conditioning is another option where changing the frequency is possibly needed. Hair that is extremely dry and breaking should start on a weekly moisturizing deep conditioning regimen. Moisturizing deep conditioners like TGIN Honey Miracle Mask Deep Conditioner, which is void of protein, will help boost moisture levels and reduce shedding. If you want a pure moisturizing deep conditioner without protein make sure to read the label to confirm.

3. Don’t Confuse A Moisturizer With A Styler

Another common mistake several new naturals make is confusing a styling product with a moisturizer. While there are a few products that work as double duty action, products like gels, curling custards, foaming lotions and mousses should not act as your daily moisturizing product. Stylers are mainly formulated for hold and definition first. A moisturizing product should still be used in conjunction with these items as you will see in most product lines. Use products where water is the first ingredient on the label such as hair lotions and hair milks for daily moisture and stylers to define your curls.

4. Understand How Glycerin Works

Glycerin is a common ingredient found in tons of products and when used correctly, glycerin can also be amazing for your hair. But, you must understand how glycerin works first. At the core, glycerin is a type of humectant, which means it attracts moisture to itself and your hair when it is found in your products. The hydrogen bonding properties of humectants attract water from the atmosphere bringing moisture to the hair and ultimately improves moisture retention. On extremely humid days too much moisture can be attracted to your hair causing the hair to swell and frizz. However, on low humidity days (cold, dry days) where the surrounding air is more dry than your hair, the opposite occurs. Moisture is drawn from the hair back into the air to balance the moisture in the atmosphere. Did you catch all that? If not, read more About Glycerin and Natural Hair.

5. Seal Moisture for YOUR Hair Type

Another key to obtaining moisturized natural hair is ensuring you are sealing moisture for YOUR hair type. I underlined “your” for a reason. Using the L.O.C method is great but this is pointless if your leave-in conditioner, oil and cream do not work for your texture. Every curl type and texture is different. What works for one woman or blogger may not work for you. Ingredients my fine, 4a-4b hair texture enjoys are shea butter creams like the Alikay Naturals Moisture Rich Parfait, thick and creamy leave in conditioners with aloe vera, and avocado oil. My hair remains moisturized up to 3 days with just leave in conditioner and shea butter…very simple and easy to manage. And because coconut oil doesn’t work for everyone also read 7 Amazing Oils for Natural Hair Besides Coconut Oil .

6. Cleanse Hair & Scalp More

Clean hair is another way to achieve more moisturized natural hair. Why? Because cleansing the hair and scalp on a regular basis will ensure product build up is removed which, in return enables your products to work better and allows moisturizing products to actually penetrate the hair and scalp. If you co-wash often product build up will happen and a clarifying shampoo is suggested for use at least monthly. Shampooing your hair every 5-7 days will remove build up, sweat and environmental elements.

7. Drink More Water

Of course this one is a no-brainer but as you’ve probably heard before, healthy hair starts from the inside. If your body is de-hydrated your skin and hair will follow. How ever you choose to take care of your skin, think of some of the same characteristics for your scalp. The common rule of thumb for daily water intake is half your body weight. For example, I am 160 lbs, therefore; I would drink 80 oz, or about 5 bottles of water per day.

What ways do you keep your hair moisturized? Comment and let me know!

How to moisturize african hair
You have spent your time choosing the perfect moisturizer for your hair while avoiding any red light ingredients. Continuing on with the back to basics series, this article will clarify how to go about your night-time routine. In essence, how to moisturize your hair.

With all the talk of moisture in the black hair community you may be surprised to learn that healthy hair is only about 10%-15% water. Not very much but when that moisture is not there dry brittle strands that breaks easily is the usual result.

Because black hair tends to be so porous it loses moisture much faster than other hair types. Porosity can be controlled with specialist hair products. But more commonly, the very act of moisturizing and sealing hair also reduces the porosity of the hair. If you apply a coating oil after a moisturizer, you are literally ‘sealing’ the moisture in your hair. The oil molecules which are generally larger than water molecules will in essence block the path and prevent moisture from leaving your hair.

A different tactic is to choose a moisturizer which contains a humectant. A humectant simply attracts moisture to your hair, usually one with glycerine or honey*. In the summer months you will find glycerine keeps your hair soft really well but in colder months, glycerine* will actually take some moisture away from your hair.

I’m a big fan of S Curl Moisturizer which is cheap and very good at it’s job!

Here is a simple but effective method of ensuring optimum moisture balance in your strands between your washes and whether your hair is relaxed or natural it will allow you to breeze through your night-time routine:

1. Divide your hair into 4 or more sections, depending on thickness.

2. Take a dime sized amount of moisturizer and rub between your palms.

3. Apply to the bottom 2 inches of your strands. There is no need to apply from the root. Moisture is lost faster from the ends upwards so this is where moisturizer application should be concentrated. You can replace the moisturizer with plan ‘ole water if you don’t fear reversion. Just use a spray bottle to lightly mist your ends.

4. Using a boar bristle brush and the method I shared here lightly brush the ends to evenly distribute the product. You should only use the boar bristle brush if your hair is straight. If it is in a curly style then use your fingers to distribute the product.

5. Rub 3-4 drops of oil between your palms and apply to the moisturized section of hair to seal. Again brush with the BBB to evenly distribute. Any more oil than this and you run the risk of leaving your hair feeling extremely coated and weighed down.

6. Repeat steps 3 – 5 for the remaining sections of hair before covering with a satin bonnet* for the night.

Note: If you are using a moisturizer with a humectant and you are in moderate to high humidity climate, it is not absolutely necessary to seal in the moisture with oil but many ladies do so anyway as added insurance! In fact the best advice for using glycerine* containing products is to always seal with oil.

Originally posted 2012-04-23 19:00:48.

Picture this: You wake up, get out of bed, and head to the kitchen to make yourself some breakfast. On your way to the fridge you glance out the window and…snow. You roll your eyes in slight annoyance. Time to protective style.

Whether you are protecting your hair from the ever-changing Canadian climate, tired of your twist-outs, frustrated with transitioning, or if you just want to change it up – protective styling is a great way to protect your hair and make it lower maintenance.

The BIGGEST mistake women make when protective styling is braiding their hair up and ignoring it for two months. If your hair is in braids make sure you follow these 9 essential maintenance guidelines. You’ll thank me when you unravel your braids and your hair is healthy, strong, and long.

Protect Your Hair At Night

Many black women were taught since we were young that tying our hair up at night is just good practice. So we tie our hair when it is out or when we want to keep our weave looking fresh – but when we’re wearing braids we throw all of that good practice out the window. Covering your head with a satin headscarf at night not only keeps your edges looking fresh it also protects your roots from drying out when you sleep. If you find satin headscarves uncomfortable then place a satin pillowcase over your pillow for a similar type of protection. If you are really a keener – do both. Wrap your head and invest in a satin pillowcase. If your headscarf comes off in the night you still have the protection of your satin pillowcase. I had a stylist who could tell when I had skipped a few days of wearing my satin headscarf. She would take one look at my scalp and scold, “Your head is dry! What did you do?!”

Keep Your Scalp Moist

This is one thing I need to get better at. Sometimes I think I’m too busy to get out my spray bottle and spray my hair. That is definitely not true. Giving your roots a quick spritz should take you no longer than a few minutes – 5 minutes maximum. Our hair is no different than any other living thing. It needs moisture to survive – and the best type of moisture is water. Our roots get thirsty and they need watering. Our roots do not need heavy gels and oils – those clog our pores and make it more difficult for our roots to absorb moisture. Our roots need plain old water to thrive and survive.

Apply moisturizing and sealing product to hair

Make a point of applying your favorite sealing product to your roots at least once a week. I usually apply a mixture of Naptural85’s homemade shea butter and my Blended Beauty Curl Styling Butter. The shea butter mix sooths my scalp, protects from hard UV rays, and seals in moisture. The styling butter gives added moisture, controls the frizzing of my braids and nourishes my hair with essential vitamins and minerals.

First I spray my whole head with water. Then I put a glob of both of these products into the middle of my palm and mix it around with my finger. Then I smooth it onto my roots – section by section. This process ends up taking me around 40 minutes if I am really diligent about getting at every braid.

Avoid unnatural products when keeping hair moisturized

Stylists warn against using anything other than naturally derived oils to keep your roots moisturized while your hair is in braids. The most important ingredients to avoid are mineral oils. Please note that these are the key ingredients in most popular braid moisturizers. Instead, opt for natural oils similar to the ones I just mentioned earlier like coconut oil and almond oil. These oils are great for soothing the scalp and retaining moisture without building up and clogging your pores like generic braid sprays often will. If you are looking for non-greasy moisture use a natural leave-in conditioner instead.

Wash your braids once every two weeks (minimum)

I know this sounds like a pain but buildup of sweat, dirt, and everything else that happens throughout your day can be damaging to your hair. Thankfully, you don’t need to hop in the shower and douse your braids in water if you don’t want to. You can always dry-wash your hair with a cloth, shampoo, and some water. Dampen a wash cloth with warm water and your shampoo of choice. Part you hair and wipe your scalp down in sections. That’s all! Follow this process once every two weeks to keep your scalp smelling and feeling fresh. No one likes braid stank.

Avoid constant up-dos

I love updos. Twisting, braiding, and tying my hair atop my head are ways for me to experiment with my look. However, constantly styling your hair into high ponytails pulls at your hairline. This constant pulling weakens the hair along your hairline and you end up looking kinda like Naomi Campbell. Be gentle with your hairline. Rock your updos – but try to limit updo styling to 3 or 4 times a week rather than every day.

Don’t pull too tightly when styling

For the same reason as #6. No one needs a Naomi Campbell situation happening up here in Canada.

Extend your style time – Redo your edges

Often, after a couple weeks your roots have grown out and it’s time to freshen up your look. Rather than rebraid your entire head – go back to your stylist and ask her to spend an hour or so re-installing the braids along your hairline. After you take out the braids along your edges, (and before you head to your stylist) take extra care to detangle and deep condition before reinstalling your braids again. Remember that your edges are already fragile, so they need a little bit of extra care and attention.

Don’t leave your braids in for too long

During one of our BHS Street interviews we met a woman who shared a horror story with us. On one occasion she had gotten braids and left them in for 3 years. 3 YEARS. When she removed the braids her hair came with it. She was left with bald spots all over her head. Now, I’m hoping none of you would make this devastating mistake. But sometime we get lazy and decide – hey four months in the same protective style can’t be that bad right? WRONG. Protective styling is meant to be short-term temporary. Stylists recommend protective styling for a month at a time – 2 months maximum. Any longer than that and your new growth will stretch and damage; this completely negates the point of protective styling. Protective styling is to give your fragile ends a break and focus on attaining new growth.

Picture this: You wake up, get out of bed, and head to the kitchen to make yourself some breakfast. On your way to the fridge you glance out the window and…snow. You roll your eyes in slight annoyance. Time to protective style.

Whether you are protecting your hair from the ever-changing Canadian climate, tired of your twist-outs, frustrated with transitioning, or if you just want to change it up – protective styling is a great way to protect your hair and make it lower maintenance.

The BIGGEST mistake women make when protective styling is braiding their hair up and ignoring it for two months. If your hair is in braids make sure you follow these 9 essential maintenance guidelines. You’ll thank me when you unravel your braids and your hair is healthy, strong, and long.

Protect Your Hair At Night

Many black women were taught since we were young that tying our hair up at night is just good practice. So we tie our hair when it is out or when we want to keep our weave looking fresh – but when we’re wearing braids we throw all of that good practice out the window. Covering your head with a satin headscarf at night not only keeps your edges looking fresh it also protects your roots from drying out when you sleep. If you find satin headscarves uncomfortable then place a satin pillowcase over your pillow for a similar type of protection. If you are really a keener – do both. Wrap your head and invest in a satin pillowcase. If your headscarf comes off in the night you still have the protection of your satin pillowcase. I had a stylist who could tell when I had skipped a few days of wearing my satin headscarf. She would take one look at my scalp and scold, “Your head is dry! What did you do?!”

Keep Your Scalp Moist

This is one thing I need to get better at. Sometimes I think I’m too busy to get out my spray bottle and spray my hair. That is definitely not true. Giving your roots a quick spritz should take you no longer than a few minutes – 5 minutes maximum. Our hair is no different than any other living thing. It needs moisture to survive – and the best type of moisture is water. Our roots get thirsty and they need watering. Our roots do not need heavy gels and oils – those clog our pores and make it more difficult for our roots to absorb moisture. Our roots need plain old water to thrive and survive.

Apply moisturizing and sealing product to hair

Make a point of applying your favorite sealing product to your roots at least once a week. I usually apply a mixture of Naptural85’s homemade shea butter and my Blended Beauty Curl Styling Butter. The shea butter mix sooths my scalp, protects from hard UV rays, and seals in moisture. The styling butter gives added moisture, controls the frizzing of my braids and nourishes my hair with essential vitamins and minerals.

First I spray my whole head with water. Then I put a glob of both of these products into the middle of my palm and mix it around with my finger. Then I smooth it onto my roots – section by section. This process ends up taking me around 40 minutes if I am really diligent about getting at every braid.

Avoid unnatural products when keeping hair moisturized

Stylists warn against using anything other than naturally derived oils to keep your roots moisturized while your hair is in braids. The most important ingredients to avoid are mineral oils. Please note that these are the key ingredients in most popular braid moisturizers. Instead, opt for natural oils similar to the ones I just mentioned earlier like coconut oil and almond oil. These oils are great for soothing the scalp and retaining moisture without building up and clogging your pores like generic braid sprays often will. If you are looking for non-greasy moisture use a natural leave-in conditioner instead.

Wash your braids once every two weeks (minimum)

I know this sounds like a pain but buildup of sweat, dirt, and everything else that happens throughout your day can be damaging to your hair. Thankfully, you don’t need to hop in the shower and douse your braids in water if you don’t want to. You can always dry-wash your hair with a cloth, shampoo, and some water. Dampen a wash cloth with warm water and your shampoo of choice. Part you hair and wipe your scalp down in sections. That’s all! Follow this process once every two weeks to keep your scalp smelling and feeling fresh. No one likes braid stank.

Avoid constant up-dos

I love updos. Twisting, braiding, and tying my hair atop my head are ways for me to experiment with my look. However, constantly styling your hair into high ponytails pulls at your hairline. This constant pulling weakens the hair along your hairline and you end up looking kinda like Naomi Campbell. Be gentle with your hairline. Rock your updos – but try to limit updo styling to 3 or 4 times a week rather than every day.

Don’t pull too tightly when styling

For the same reason as #6. No one needs a Naomi Campbell situation happening up here in Canada.

Extend your style time – Redo your edges

Often, after a couple weeks your roots have grown out and it’s time to freshen up your look. Rather than rebraid your entire head – go back to your stylist and ask her to spend an hour or so re-installing the braids along your hairline. After you take out the braids along your edges, (and before you head to your stylist) take extra care to detangle and deep condition before reinstalling your braids again. Remember that your edges are already fragile, so they need a little bit of extra care and attention.

Don’t leave your braids in for too long

During one of our BHS Street interviews we met a woman who shared a horror story with us. On one occasion she had gotten braids and left them in for 3 years. 3 YEARS. When she removed the braids her hair came with it. She was left with bald spots all over her head. Now, I’m hoping none of you would make this devastating mistake. But sometime we get lazy and decide – hey four months in the same protective style can’t be that bad right? WRONG. Protective styling is meant to be short-term temporary. Stylists recommend protective styling for a month at a time – 2 months maximum. Any longer than that and your new growth will stretch and damage; this completely negates the point of protective styling. Protective styling is to give your fragile ends a break and focus on attaining new growth.

Top 50 Natural Hair Products For Black Hair 1. Shea Moisture Strengthen, Grow + Restore Conditioner 2. Shea Moisture Coconut Hibiscus Curl + Style Milk 3. Carol’s Daughter Black Vanilla Sulfate-Free Shampoo 4. Carol’s Daughter Mimosa Hair Honey Shine Pomade 5. Carol’s Daughter Hair Milk Leave-In Moisturizer

Table of Contents

What are the best hair care products for African Americans?

Below are some of the best hair care products for African American Hair: Moisturizers: Moroccan oil, Original Moxie Oasis Moisture Gel, Quidad Curl quencher Moisturizing Gel. Shampoos: Crème of Nature Argan Oil Moisture and Shine Shampoo; Elucence Moisture Benefits shampoo; Beautiful Textures Tangle Taming Shampoo.

What are the best hair products for black women?

The 20 Best Natural Hair Products For Black Women In 2019 1. Alaffia EveryDay Moisturizing Shampoo, Top For 4c Hair 2. Oyin Handmade Grand Poo Bar Shampoo (Homemade Hair Product) 3. Best Natural Hair Product: Motions Hair And Scalp Daily Moisturizing Hair Treatment 4. Tangle-Free CD4KIDS Trio -Shampoo – Detangler; A Top Natural Conditioner

What is the best hair growth product for black women?

Coconut Oil. Free of any drying preservatives or chemicals, natural coconut oil is an excellent moisturizer for African-American hair. Due to it’s natural effectiveness, it supports the health of the scalp as well as hair growth. Extra virgin coconut oil is best and should appear clear and have a fresh aroma and taste.

What is the history of African American hair?

The black hairstyle history and techniques originated in Africa. The story of African American hairstyles is as long as the first African slaves were brought to the New World in the early seventeenth century. A lot has changed since that time, and a lot has stayed the same.

What are some good African American hair products?

Best Hair Growth Products for African American Hair

  • ① ArtNaturals Argan Hair Growth Shampoo and Conditioner set by ArtNaturals.
  • ② Hair Growth Vitamin Supplements by Zenwise Health.
  • ③ PURA D’OR Original Gold Label Shampoo and Conditioner for Anti-Thinning.
  • ④ Shea Moisture Jamaican Black Castor Oil.
  • ⑤ iRestore Laser Hair Growth System.

Is shampoo or conditioner better for African hair?

Jason Biotin Shampoo & Conditioner – Best Biotin Shampoo for Black Hair The Jason biotin shampoo & conditioner is good for promoting hydrating agents for maximum hair growth. It has Biotin and Vitamin B5 for giving hydrating ingredients into the scalp for cleaning well.

What is the best oil for African hair?

The best natural oils for moisturizing black hair are argan oil, jojoba oil and emu oil. Argan oil, morocco oil, provides moisture deep into hair, cuts down drying time, reduces flaking and leaves hair more manageable.

What are the best hair care products?

Coconut, prickly pear, and argan oils are some of the most popular choices in hair-repairing treatments, while proteins, both synthetic and plant-based, are also great for reversing damage, as they help strengthen weakened hair.