How to prevent alcohol poisoning

How to prevent alcohol poisoning

Alcohol poisoning occurs when a person consumes a toxic amount of alcohol, usually within a short period of time. Binge drinking is a common cause of alcohol poisoning. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, binge drinking is a drinking pattern that results in raising the person’s blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to .08 grams percent, or higher. This typically occurs when a man consumes 5 or more alcoholic drinks in about 2 hours; and when a woman consumes 4 or more drinks in about 2 hours.

Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms and Signs

The person who has consumed a toxic (poisonous) amount of alcohol may become unresponsive, extremely confused, and disoriented. He or she may be breathing shallowly, and have pale or bluish-tinged skin. The person may pass out (go unconscious), and can slip into a coma.

The person cannot be roused, and may be unresponsive to your voice, pinching of the skin, or to shaking. Their skin may be clammy, cold, blotchy, pale or bluish. He or she may experience stupor, mental confusion of coma. Their breathing will be slow, with only 8 or fewer breaths per minute. The person may also experience lapses in their breathing, with 10 seconds or more between each breath. He or she may have convulsions, seizures or rigid spasms of the body. The person may vomit while unconscious or asleep, and not awaken.

15 Ways to Prevent Alcohol Poisoning

Alcohol poisoning is life-threatening, and its prevention can mean saving another person’s life. As with any life-threatening situation, it is always best to prevent it from happening in the first place. It is also wise to know what to do to help another when faced with a life-threatening situation. With that in mind, the following are ways to prevent alcohol poisoning:

Learn the Facts

Learn the facts about alcohol poisoning, and its signs and symptoms.

Share your Knowledge

Share what you have learned with others.

Be Temperate

Do not drink alcohol to excess.

Encourage Others to be Temperate

Encourage friends, family and peers not to drink alcohol to excess.

Do Not Binge Drink

Do not drink numerous drinks in a short period of time, raising your BAC to dangerously high levels.

Discourage Others from Binge Drinking

Discourage and prevent others from endangering their lives by binge drinking.

Know the Signs and Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

Commit them to memory, and recognize them when you see them in another.

Ensure Others Know the Signs and Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

Get others to commit them to memory so they, too, will recognize them in another.

Know What Actions to Take

When you observe a person exhibiting any of the signs or symptoms of alcohol poisoning or overdose, call 911, and apply First Aid.

Stay with the Person

Do not leave them alone for any reason.

Learn First Aid

Take a class in First Aid, and learn the basics of what to do to help someone with alcohol poisoning.

Encourage Others to Learn First Aid

Encourage friends, family and peers to learn basic First Aid, and what to do to help someone with alcohol poisoning.

Learn CPR

CPR, (Cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is a lifesaving technique. It is used when a person’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped, such as can happen with alcohol poisoning. Check online for classes in your area.

Learn the Bacchus Maneuver

You use the Bacchus Maneuver to position a passed-out person so they will not choke on their own vomit. It is simple to learn, and important to know. Check online for instructions and graphics on how to do it.

Be Prepared to Administer CPR

If someone is suffering from alcohol poisoning, be prepared to administer CPR.

While you are waiting for emergency medical personnel to arrive, do everything you know or have been wise enough to learn to keep the person warm, conscious, and safe from choking and aspiration (breathing vomit into the lungs).

Preventing alcohol poisoning in the first place is by far the safest and wisest action to take. Be well-informed, and well-prepared.

How to prevent alcohol poisoning

It seems like every few months, we see another heartbreaking news story about alcohol poisoning. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), every year more than 4,300 underage youth die after excessive drinking.

It’s prom, senior party and graduation season, and soon teens will be heading off to college. Learning about alcohol poisoning symptoms and how to intervene can help prevent more of these tragic deaths.

What is Alcohol Poisoning?

When you swallow alcohol, it gets absorbed into your blood and distributed throughout the entire body rapidly. Alcohol acts as a mood-altering substance, a central nervous system depressant and an irritant to the stomach. When people consume large amounts of alcohol in a short period of time, they increase the risk of an overdose, also known as alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning symptoms may include:

  • Slowed reaction time
  • Mental confusion
  • Unsteady balance and poor coordination
  • Sleepiness
  • Unconsciousness, also known as “passing out”
  • Slowed or irregular breathing
  • Lowered body temperature
  • Vomiting
  • Choking
  • Seizures, coma and death

Even small amounts of alcohol can lead to poor judgment and reckless behavior, putting you at a greater risk of crime or assault.

Possible Alcohol Poisoning?

Not sure if you need medical help? Call the Blue Ridge Poison Center 24/7 for free and confidential advice: 1.800.222.1222.

Helping a Drunk Person

Plenty of home remedies promise to sober up an intoxicated person, such as:

  • Cold showers
  • Caffeine
  • Exercise
  • A big meal
  • Drinking lots of water
  • Making the intoxicated person vomit

In fact, these “remedies” will not sober a person up faster, and some of them may cause even more harm.

Instead, follow these tips to keep your friends safe:

  • Do your best to stop them from consuming any more alcohol.
  • Help them get them safely home. Do not let them drive.
  • If they go to sleep, place them on their side, not their back, which will help keep their airway open if they start vomiting.

Dangerously Drunk: When to Call 911

Never leave an intoxicated person alone to “sleep it off.” A person’s blood alcohol content may continue to rise after they’ve stopped drinking, and leading to possible choking, coma, respiratory arrest, and death. The Gordie Center for Substance Abuse and Prevention at UVA lists these four signs (PUBS) that a person’s life may be in jeopardy:

  • Puking while passed out
  • Unresponsive to stimulation (pinch or shaking)
  • Breathing (slow, shallow or no breathing)
  • Skin (blue, cold or clammy)

If you see any one of the “PUBS” signs, call 911 right away. Don’t worry that a victim may become angry or embarrassed or that someone may get into trouble. You could save a life.

Medical Amnesty

Virginia is one of 35 states which have some form of a “good samaritan” or medical amnesty law. These laws protect victims and witnesses who act in good faith to seek medical assistance when they believe an overdose to drugs or alcohol is occurring.

Alcohol Abuse Prevention: Learn More

Additionally, some schools have adopted their own versions of a medical amnesty policy, promising to remove or lessen the disciplinary action against any student who seeks help — or needs help — with an alcohol or drug overdose. By law, hospitals must protect the privacy of all patients and are not allowed to report back to a school about any student’s visit to the emergency room or any other healthcare service.

“If there’s a concern about one of their friends being openly drunk and not responsive, they should call EMS,” says Chris Holstege, MD, co-medical director of UVA’s Blue Ridge Poison Center and executive director of UVA Student Health. “No one will know except for them. There’s a misconception that the hospital is going to tell somebody, but that’s not true.”

UVA Police Department chief Michael Gibson adds, “ When someone calls 911 because of a concern for their health or someone else’s, getting the person the medical care that they need will always be our top priority.”

Preventing Alcohol Poisoning

Make smart, responsible and legal drinking decisions:

  • Alternate alcoholic beverages with non‐alcoholic beverages.
  • Eat before and while consuming alcohol to slow its absorption into your body.
  • Know what you’re drinking, and don’t accept drinks from strangers. Some mixed drinks have more than one serving of alcohol in them.
  • Use designated drivers who stay sober.

Rapid drinking behavior such as chugging, doing shots or using a beer bong is extremely dangerous.

Teens and Drinking: What Can Parents Do?

Studies show that parents do have real influence over their children’s drinking decisions. The Partnership for Drug‐free Kids has a wealth of information for parents on their website, including tips for talking to your teen, signs and symptoms of alcohol abuse and resources for help if you suspect your teen has a problem.

How to prevent alcohol poisoning

The poisoning of alcohol occurs whenever an individual consume a high volume of alcohol within a short duration. One of the common cause of alcohol poisoning is binge drinking. According to the report given by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, binge drinking is a kind of drinking pattern which results in raising the alcohol concentration in the person’s blood to about 0.08 gram percent. This usually occur whenever a man consume 5 or more alcoholic drinks within a duration of 2 hours and when a woman consumes 4 or more drinks within a duration of 2 hours.

Alcohol Poisoning Symptoms and Signs

An individual that has consumes a toxic amount of alcohol may become unresponsive, extremely confused, and disoriented. The person may be breathing shallowly, and having bluish-tinged or pale skin. The person can likewise become unconscious and slip into a coma.

The person cannot be roused, and may not be able to respond to voice, shaking or pinching of the skin. He or she may experience the metal confusion of coma. Such individual will breath slowly with only a few breath within a minute, it is also possible for such individual to experience lapses which can be up to 10 seconds between the breath. He or she may likewise have seizures, convulsions or rigid spasms of the body. Such individual may also vomit during the sleep and would not wake up during the process. Learn more about the symptoms of alcohol poisoning.

Prevent ing Alcohol Poisoning

The poisoning of alcohol is life threating, and the prevention would ensure a life is saved. Just like any life threatening situation, the best thing is to prevent its occurrence in the first place. It is also crucial to know the appropriate thing to do to help another whenever they are faced with a life threatening situation. Having that in mind, alcohol poisoning can be prevented with these approaches:

Pace and Space – Ensure you sip your drink rather than chugging. Ensure you alternate with non-alcoholic beverages and don’t have more than one drink per hour. This is because the average duration it takes most people to eliminate the alcohol in 2 standard drinks is 3 hours.

Eat before and while drinking – The rate of absorption of alcohol into the body system is much slower when there is food (proteins containing food) within your stomach. This would reduce the rate of absorption and thus prevent alcohol poisoning.

Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs – Some over-the-counter and prescription drugs such as antihistamines, sedatives can enhance alcoholic effect. Caffeine and stimulants (i.e. Energy Drinks) can also make you feel less impaired.

Use caution when sick or tired – Whenever you are sleeping deprived or ill, alcohol leaves the body slowly.

Avoid “mega” drinks – Long Island Ice Tea, Margaritas, AMF or Kamikazes contains five or more alcohol than other standard drink.

Set your limit before you start – So as to set your limits, think about the activities you have the following day such as tests, early morning classes, athletics competition. This is because alcohol poisoning can affect the way you think as well as reduce your performance.

Avoid drinking games – Drinking games usually promote the rapid ingestion of alcohol and may result to “black outs” or severe intoxication. Additionally, during games there is no likelihood that you will stop at your own personal limit you set before going to the party.

About a half-dozen young people die every year in the U.S. of alcohol poisoning, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). These tragic deaths are completely preventable. You can help prevent alcohol poisoning.

Following the alcohol poisoning death of Samantha Spady, her parents established the SAM Spady Foundation. It’s to educate people to the dangers of high risk drinking and the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning. It alerts people they should never to leave an intoxicated person alone. In addition, people should call 911 if a person ever has any of these symptoms. That is, if the person is

  • unconscious or semiconscious
  • breathing fewer than ten tomes per minute or is breathing irregularly
  • cold, clammy, pale or has bluish skin
  • cannot be awakened by pinching, prodding or shouting, or
  • vomiting without waking up.

Sensible Drinking

Any intoxication always carries a degree of risk. People who choose to drink should always do so in moderation. The following tips are helpful in drinking sensibly:

  • Remember. The amount of pure alcohol in standard drinks is virtually identical. It’s six-tenths of one ounce. When it comes to alcohol, a drink is a drink is a drink. And they are all the same to a breathalyzer.
  • Know your limit. If you’re unsure, experiment at home with a responsible person. Most people find that they can consume one drink per hour without any ill effects.
  • Eat food while you drink. Food helps slow the absorption of alcohol into your body. Sip your drink. Enjoy savoring its flavors and aromas.

No Drinking Games

  • Don’t engage in “chugging” contests or other drinking games.
  • Accept a drink only when it fits with your drink spacing schedule. If someone tries to force a drink on you, ask for a non-alcohol beverage instead. If that doesn’t work, “lose” your drink by setting it down somewhere and later leave it.
  • Alternate. Having a non-alcoholic drink between alcoholic ones helps you control your blood alcohol content (BAC). So does spacing your alcoholic drinks.

Learn more about standard drinks and why they’’re important.

Hosts

If you’re serving as host, always be responsible:

  • Create a setting conducive to easy, comfortable socializing. Soft music, low levels of noise, and comfortable seating. This encourages conversation and social interaction rather than heavy drinking.
  • Serve food before beginning to serve drinks. This de-emphasizes the importance of alcohol and also sends the message that intoxication is not desirable.
  • Have a responsible person serve as bartender. If you ask a friend or relative, make sure that person is not a drink pusher.How to prevent alcohol poisoning
  • Don’t have an “open bar.” A responsible person should supervise consumption to ensure that no one drinks too much. You have both a moral and a legal responsibility to make sure that none of your guests drink too much.
  • Pace the drinks. Serve drinks at regular reasonable intervals. A drink-an-hour schedule is a good guide.
  • Push snacks. Make sure that people are eating.
  • Be sure to offer a diversity of attractive non-alcoholic drinks. (For numerous non-alcohol drink recipes, visit Non-Alcoholic Drinks).
  • Respect anyone’s choice not to drink. Remember that about one-third of American adults choose not to drink. A guest’s reason for not drinking is the business of the guest only. Be careful not to put anyone on the defense for not drinking.
  • End your gathering properly. Decide when you want the party to end and stop serving drinks well before that time. Then begin serving coffee along with substantial snacks. This provides essential non-drinking time before your guests leave.

If our friends use poor judgment we need to step in to prevent them from drinking too much. We really can help prevent alcohol poisoning!

Pace and Space – Sip your drink instead of chugging. Alternate with non-alcoholic beverages and have no more than 1 drink per hour. On average it take almost 3 hours for most people to eliminate the alcohol in 2 standard drinks.

Eat before and while drinking – Alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream more slowly when there is food (especially protein) in your stomach.

Avoid mixing alcohol with other drugs – Some prescription and over-the-counter drugs (i.e. antihistamines, sedatives) can increase the effects of alcohol. Caffeine and stimulants (i.e. Energy Drinks) can trick you into feeling less impaired.

Use caution when sick or tired – When you’re sleep deprived or ill, alcohol leaves the body more slowly.

Avoid “mega” drinks – Long Island Ice Tea, AMF, Margaritas or Kamikazes contain five or more times alcohol then a standard drink.

Set your limit before you start – To set your limit, think about tomorrow’s activities, such as early morning classes, tests, althletic competition – extreme alcohol consumption can effect your ability to think critically and slow your performance.

Use a designated driver – This is not the least drunk person in your group. Agree on your designated driver before you leave.

Avoid drinking games – These promote rapid ingestion of alcohol and may lead to severe intoxication and “black outs.” Also while playing drinking games it is not likely you will stop at your personal limit you set before you left for the party.

Safer Drinking Guidelines

Zero drinks is the only safe choice for people in certain situations – for example – consuming alcohol under the age of 21 years is illegal and can lead to legal consequences, driving, pregnant or taking certain perscription or over-the-counter medications.

No more than 1 drink per hour. On average it takes most people nearly 3 hours to eliminate the alcohol of 2 standard drinks.

Remember, everyone’s BAC rises at different rates, however, everyone sobers up at approximately the same rate. A cold shower, coffee, food, exercise or medicine will not sober a person up faster. Time is the ONLY thing that can sober a person up.

So making deliberate decisions about alcohol, whether you choose to drink or not, is key to reducing your risk.

Yes, you should have fun in college, but having fun isn’t limited to getting wasted every night. Ways that you can have fun without alcohol or drugs include: throwing sober parties, where you get together with friends, watch movies, dance, talk, or even engage in fun and creative activities, such as making movies.

How can you prevent alcohol poisoning?

How do you prevent alcohol poisoning?

  1. Avoid drinking games: Games can put pressure on participants to binge drink.
  2. Stay hydrated: Drink water after every alcoholic beverage.
  3. Don’t mix alcohol and medicine: Never drink alcohol while taking prescription medications.
  4. Eat first: Don’t drink on an empty stomach.

What are ways you think the university could encourage students to consume alcohol responsibly?

12 Ways to Drink Responsibly in College

  • Sip on water. Or chug it. …
  • Power up your phone. …
  • Beware of binge drinking — faster isn’t always better. …
  • Be aware. …
  • Know your limits — and don’t exceed them. …
  • Don’t mix and sip. …
  • Stick with your squad. …
  • Have an exit plan.

How often do college students die from alcohol poisoning?

A recent survey of deaths at 157 four-year colleges, conducted by researchers at the University of Virginia, found 1.49 deaths per 100,000 students from alcohol-related nontraffic injuries; by contrast, the suicide rate was 6.17.)

Do college students drink a lot?

Roughly 80 percent of college students – four out of every five – consume alcohol to some degree. It’s estimated that 50 percent of those students engage in binge drinking, which involves consuming too much alcohol in too little time. Many young adults admit to drinking alcohol even before they enter college.

What alcohol do college students drink?

OneClass has revealed that college students overwhelmingly prefer spirits to hard seltzer, beer or wine. Speaking of wine, just 10 percent of those surveyed claimed it as their favored drink. Not surprisingly, the top wine brands aren’t pricey: Barefoot and Black Star Farms top the list.

What can you do for alcohol poisoning at home?

Emergency Action for Alcohol Poisoning

  1. Call 911 right away.
  2. Don’t leave the person alone.
  3. Try to keep them awake and sitting upright.
  4. Have them sip water if they’re awake.
  5. Cover them with a warm blanket.
  6. If they’re passed out, get them onto their side to keep them from choking on vomit.

How do you help a drunk teenager?

Here’s how to deal with a drunk child or teenager, and get it right.

  1. Stay Calm. Bruce Ayres / Getty Images. …
  2. Find Out How Much Your Child Had to Drink. …
  3. Get Medical Help If Necessary. …
  4. Call the Police If Violence Erupts. …
  5. Rehydrate. …
  6. Keep Your Child Awake. …
  7. Put Your Child in the Recovery Position.

Can you speed up the process of alcohol metabolism?

Nothing will speed up the rate of detoxification, but the effective metabolism of alcohol can be limited by medications and liver damage.

How do you drink responsible?

Ways to drink responsibly can include:

  1. Only drinking on a full stomach.
  2. Having a glass of water in between drinks.
  3. Avoiding shots or drinks with high alcohol content.
  4. Avoiding drinking games.
  5. Having a sober driver available.
  6. Drinking only in appropriate settings.

About the author

Hello everyone. My name is Lilith. In this blog I will tell you about the student portal, what it is, how it is useful and how to use it. The idea for the project was invented a year ago, when I was a student.
And I wanted every student to be able to find useful information on their specialty. Join and learn a lot of useful information.

Before you go any further, it needs to be stated emphatically that you should never try to treat alcohol poisoning at home without first consulting a medical professional. However, what many of us consider to be alcohol poisoning is, in reality, just having had too much to drink. Clinical alcohol poisoning means that your blood alcohol levels are high enough to cause serious damage to vital organs which has the potential to cause irrevocable injury up to and including death. Consequently, you must first ascertain that these toxic levels have not been reached, which means getting that individual to an emergency facility immediately. The following information should prove to be helpful in taking the necessary steps to determine if you are looking at a real medical emergency or a simple matter of having had a few too many.

Signs to Look for in Alcohol Poisoning

Medical experts tell you that the first thing to look for is the inability to rouse the inebriated person from a drunken stupor. If you cannot bring the person to some semblance of wakefulness then call for emergency assistance immediately. Don’t assume that it is best to let them ‘sleep it off.’ That could be the worst judgment call of all time! The next thing to do is try to figure out if that person also ingested any drugs, both legal and illegal. Statistics prove that most cases of suspected alcohol poisoning and/or drug overdose is because the person took some form of pharmaceutical or chemical substance within a short time of or during the process of drinking alcohol. Again, if you cannot bring your friend, acquaintance or loved one to a level of consciousness to answer your questions as to exactly what they have taken or drunk, it’s time for medical intervention.

Medical Treatment for Alcohol Poisoning

At the hospital, the first thing they will probably do is ‘pump’ the person’s stomach. The medical name for this procedure is called gastric irrigation or gastric lavage. This entails placing a tube down the patient’s nose or mouth and feeding it down to the stomach. Small amounts of a saline solution will be fed into the stomach and then suctioned out. This process is repeated as many times as necessary until the liquid brought up is clear. Once the doctor is assured that the stomach has been evacuated of any alcoholic or chemical contents, he or she will then determine if any further treatments need to be administered. Alcohol poisoning is nothing to play with and alcohol poisoning treatment at home should never be attempted. However, most often it is possible to treat extreme intoxication at home if it has not reached toxic levels in the system.

“Suspected Alcohol Poisoning” Treatment at Home

If you find that your friend or relative is able to stay somewhat conscious then the first thing to do when considering alcohol poisoning treatment at home is to stay with them at all times to observe. Even if they need to dash to the bathroom to ‘puke their guts out,’ stay with them at all costs. Actually, vomiting is nature’s way of clearing the offending substances, in this case alcohol, from the body. Your job will be to make sure they don’t drown in their own vomit or hit their head on the sink or toilet in the process. Losing consciousness in the act of vomiting is extremely dangerous because the person could land on his or her back and literally suffocate in vomit. Also, hydrating the individual with water is a good thing. Both vomiting and the amount of alcohol in the person’s system will dehydrate them rapidly which can bring about a whole new set of problems. To sum it up, home treatment includes staying with them at all times even when vomiting, keeping them awake or at least upright and making sure they stay hydrated with fluids (non alcoholic!)

Alcohol Poisoning Treatment at Home to Avoid

First of all, coffee is never a solution. There is an old joke that says the only thing coffee does for a drunk is make him a wide awake drunk. Although that in and of itself isn’t a bad thing because you want to keep him or her awake, the bad thing is that coffee can also exacerbate dehydration. Caffeine and alcohol don’t mix well at the best of times. The second thing to avoid when treating borderline alcohol poisoning at home is letting the drunk ‘sleep it off.’ You have no way to monitor their level of coherence when they are asleep and if you leave them, even for a moment, they could vomit and drown in it. And, the final home remedy that some lunatic came up with is to give them a shot of something alcoholic to ease the tremors. That’s just perfect logic to an idiot! It’s like saying treat a burn by sticking your hand back in the fire.

The important thing to consider here is that you really can’t give alcohol poisoning treatment at home. You can, however, assist a person who has simply had a bit too much to drink. There may be a fine line between ‘too much to drink’ and ‘alcohol poisoning’ so being aware of the signs and symptoms can be a literal lifesaver. If you even suspect that alcohol levels are at a toxic level, don’t attempt home remedies. Get emergency help immediately as your first line of attack. If it is determined that the person’s alcohol levels are not high enough to warrant medical intervention, follow the steps outlined above and all should be well – for you at least! Your drunken friend might take a while to recover.

How to prevent alcohol poisoning

The perfect drinking scenario is to feel that happy buzz, but to avoid the gut-wrenching, nausea-inducing blackout drunk that can turn a good night into the worst night of your life. In extreme scenarios, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, hospitalization, and even death, as one 21-year-old binge-drinker nearly experienced herself.That being said, you may be curious to learn how to drink and enjoy yourself, without getting too drunk. A new video out of the Brit Lab examines this question, focusing particularly on how visual information about alcohol can impact the way we drink. For example, in 2015, researchers published a study in which they stated that the shape of your beer glass can affect how quickly you drink alcohol. They found that people who drank from curved beer or wine glasses consumed more alcohol than people who drank from straight glasses — likely because it’s tougher to gage how much booze is in a curved glass. And people who drank from glasses that were marked — showing the number of ounces in your glass — tend to drink less.So the first step in your night of enjoyment is to choose to drink from a straight glass if possible, or to be aware of the amount of ounces or pints you’re consuming. There are plenty of other tips to drink smart, like drinking your liquor neat or on the rocks as opposed to mixing it with sugary beverages. This will reduce the stomach-upsetting results of mixing sugar with alcohol, which can be especially dehydrating. Drink water in between each drink, and be sure to eat plenty of food before beginning the night, as drinking on an empty stomach can be especially damaging for the body — allowing alcohol to travel much faster to your organs. And perhaps the most effective tip is to avoid mixing different alcohol. If you’re drinking beer and whiskey for the night, don’t add wine or tequila into the mix, and maybe stick to lighter beers like lagers or pilsners.There are plenty of reasons to learn how to drink right, and the most important ones — aside from avoiding embarrassing behavior — are health-related. Young adults who binge-drink are setting themselves up for a higher risk of chronic disorders later on, like alcoholism/substance abuse and high blood pressure. In a recent study, researchers found that drinking excessively led to pre-hypertension in twentysomethings. So find the methods that work best for you, and enjoy that buzz without its damaging consequences. Youtube

The perfect drinking scenario is to feel that happy buzz, but to avoid the gut-wrenching, nausea-inducing blackout drunk that can turn a good night into the worst night of your life. In extreme scenarios, drinking too much can lead to alcohol poisoning, hospitalization, and even death, as one 21-year-old binge-drinker nearly experienced herself.

That being said, you may be curious to learn how to drink and enjoy yourself, without getting too drunk. A new video out of the Brit Lab examines this question, focusing particularly on how visual information about alcohol can impact the way we drink. For example, in 2015, researchers published a study in which they stated that the shape of your beer glass can affect how quickly you drink alcohol. They found that people who drank from curved beer or wine glasses consumed more alcohol than people who drank from straight glasses — likely because it’s tougher to gage how much booze is in a curved glass. And people who drink from glasses that are marked, depicting the number of ounces, tend to drink less.

So the first step in your night of enjoyment is to choose to drink from a straight glass if possible, or to be aware of the amount of ounces or pints you’re consuming. There are plenty of other tips to drink smart, like drinking your liquor neat or on the rocks as opposed to mixing it with sugary beverages. This will reduce the stomach-upsetting results of mixing sugar with alcohol, which can be especially dehydrating. Drink water in between each drink, and be sure to eat plenty of food before beginning the night, as drinking on an empty stomach can be especially damaging for the body — allowing alcohol to travel much faster to your organs. And perhaps the most effective tip is to avoid mixing different alcohol. If you’re drinking beer and whiskey for the night, don’t add wine or tequila into the mix, and maybe stick to lighter beers like lagers or pilsners.

There are plenty of reasons to learn how to drink right, and the most important ones — aside from avoiding embarrassing behavior — are health-related. Young adults who binge-drink are setting themselves up for a higher risk of chronic disorders later on, like alcoholism/substance abuse and high blood pressure. In a recent study, researchers found that drinking excessively led to pre-hypertension in twentysomethings. So find the methods that work best for you, and enjoy that buzz without its damaging consequences.