How to resign elegantly

February 22, 2021

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Resigning gracefully from a position helps you effectively transition from one career opportunity to the next while maintaining good relationships with your colleagues. Learning to resign with professionalism increases your chances of getting positive references from your former coworkers. Your former colleagues may also be more likely to help you professionally in the future if you left your last position respectfully. In this article, we discuss how to resign gracefully from any position.

What does it mean to resign gracefully?

When you notify your employer of your intention to leave your job, resigning gracefully means you are doing so in a dignified and respectful way. When you resign gracefully, you achieve several things:

You maintain goodwill with your employer, which can help you get a positive reference and perhaps work with them again in the future.

You can have time to resolve work and train coworkers to perform your duties when you leave.

You demonstrate to your new employer that you care enough to resign respectfully and will likely encourage them to show you the same grace.

How to resign gracefully

Resigning appropriately from a position takes careful planning, so take some time after receiving another job offer to make sure you do it right. Follow these steps to resign gracefully and leave your job in a positive manner:

Notify your supervisor.

Submit your resignation letter, if required.

Work through your notice period.

Return any company property.

Take personal items home.

1. Notify your supervisor

Tell your supervisor you intend to leave your job before notifying your coworkers and clients. Ideally, you should notify your supervisor about your resignation in person. If this is not possible, perhaps due to your location, discuss your decision with your supervisor over the phone. Mention the following points during your conversation:

When you intend to leave your job.

Your reason for leaving, such as going back to school or accepting a new job.

Your thanks for the opportunities you’ve had in your role.

You should also discuss what will happen next. Talk about how your coworkers and clients, if appropriate, will learn you are leaving. Your supervisor might like to announce the news at a meeting or prefer you to write a group email. You should also discuss your transition plan. For example, you could volunteer to train staff on how to perform your duties or agree to answer any questions after you leave.

2. Submit your resignation letter

Submitting a professional resignation letter formally tells your company you will leave your position. It is not required in many modern workplaces, but some businesses still prefer this paperwork. You may submit your resignation letter when you notify your supervisor if you meet with them in person. Alternatively, you could submit your resignation letter shortly after your discussion, ideally on the same business day.

Your resignation letter should contain the following information:

A statement of your resignation

The date of your last day of employment

Sincere gratitude to your employer for the experience

Information about the transition, such as who can take over your duties

Your contact details, especially if you have volunteered to answer any job-related questions after you leave

Some companies prefer hard copy resignation letters, while others accept resignation letters via email. Check with your supervisor about which format they would prefer if you are unsure.

3. Work through your notice period

You should work as you normally would through your notice period. This is usually a period of two weeks, but it is often more respectful to offer three or four weeks notice, depending on your role or your organization. Refer to your contract, union agreement or employee handbook to learn how much notice is required. If you cannot find this information, ask your supervisor. You may like to give more than the required notice if your job is complex or you resign during a busy period.

Arrive to work on time and complete all tasks efficiently and punctually during your notice period. Try to resolve your part in any projects or ongoing cases, and organize your files to make your successor’s transition easier. Document your typical processes and provide progress reports on any large projects so someone else can easily resume your work. These efforts during your notice period can help you leave a lasting positive impression.

Note that your employer may terminate your employment immediately, especially if you have a new role with a competing organization. If this occurs, you should leave your workplace immediately after submitting your resignation notice.

4. Return any company property

Return any property you have been using during your employment that does not belong to you. This might include laptops, smartphones, company files and vehicles. Being proactive about returning these items reflects positively on you. These items should be returned in the condition you received them. Delete personal files and contact information from electronic devices before returning them.

5. Take personal items home

On your last day of employment, you should clean up your desk and take all personal items home. Take notes of contact details for colleagues you want to stay in touch with, as you may not be able to access them once you leave. Leave your workspace clean and tidy for the next employee.

These steps can be applied to most workplaces, but some employers have their own resignation procedures. Consult your employee handbook to make sure you follow your employer’s preferred resignation process.

Tips for resigning gracefully

Following preferred resignation procedures can help you leave your job gracefully. However, these additional strategies can make you look more dignified when you resign.

Keep your communication positive. Regardless of your motivation for leaving your job, communicate your decision to your workplace in a positive way. Focus on the skills you have learned, the friendships you have made and the positive experiences you have had when talking to people in your current and new place of employment.

Limit talk of your new job. While you are working out your notice, focus on your current job rather than your next opportunity. You can certainly answer any questions people have about your next role, but speak humbly and keep your answers concise.

Be open to staying longer. Some employers may ask you to stay longer to help them transition to the company without you. If you can stay longer, giving an extended notice period can endear you to your employer. If you cannot stay longer, be honest about your situation and say you are sorry you cannot help.

Whatever the reasons, you’ve made up your mind to resign and move on. It’s not easy, especially after many years of giving your all to your job and your coworkers. In any case, your first step is to draft a letter of resignation¯a sensitive move that if done improperly can have a strong negative impact on your future employment opportunities.

Writing a resignation letter must be done from your head, not your gut, even if it is your annoying job or your hated boss that made you write that letter. Remember: It’s a small world; whatever you write in that letter can play for you or against you when potential employers call up checking on you. Following are eight tips that will help you write an effective, elegant letter of resignation:

(1) Send a printed letter
Print the letter rather than hand-writing it, so your writing and details are clear, and there are no potential misunderstandings.

(2) Keep it brief
Start by mentioning the important details: date, addressed to the full name of your direct superior, headline, body, and your name and signature.

(3) Be formal and succinct
i.e. “After much thought, I have decided to move on and leave [Name of your Company].”

(4) Keep it positive
i.e. “I appreciate [company name] for giving me the opportunity to be part of your team. I wish you all the best and hereby inform you that I will be at your disposal before and after my departure for any matter that requires my assistance.”

(5) Mention prior notice
i.e.: “As per my employment agreement, I am obligated to give X days’ notice, making my departure date [day of week, date].”

(6) Sign it manually and keep two copies of the original
You may need them for future legal reasons.

Best Regards,
[your signature],
John Smith

(7) Proofread before sending
No matter how you see it, writing a resignation letter is a
formal procedure; it must be done accurately. A small grammar error, for example, can cause undesired misinterpretations that may have legal consequences. Professional grammar check software can help you with proofreading.

(8) Deliver it personally, in a sealed envelope
After doing so, make sure to notify at least one of your coworkers, as you never know how your employer may react. For legal reasons, it is a good idea to have a witness who can testify as to the date and time of your resignation.

Learn more about writing a resignation letter and other useful documents by using an advanced online grammar check software.

Among the most difficult things to do in life, one of them is breaking relationships—including work. There are many reasons why you want to resign from your current job. Maybe there is are better job opportunities elsewhere or you feel less suited to the work environment in your office right now. Whatever your reason for quitting your job, it is typically a difficult situation. If you do have to leave, leave a positive impression in your old office. Here are some ways to resign in a professional way.

Talk directly to your boss

You are accepted at the office and welcomed, when you want to resign, be sure to meet your boss and reveal your intentions well. Update your boss first about your resignation plan. Do not let the office gossip about your resignation, especially if you have not talked directly with your boss. If this happens, you will have a bad impression which comes with uncomfortable feelings when you meet him directly.

Inform your resignation minimum a month before

Remember, you are not working alone in the company. A sudden resignation will inconvenience many people. So, give at least one month between the time you file the resignation letter until the last day you work. The time is required for the transition of work between you and the person who will replace you.

Keep doing your best

In between your resignation and your last day, keep working as well as you can. Although it has resigned, does not mean you can work carelessly. You have an obligation to complete all your work as much as possible before your last day, so you leave your old office with a positive impression.

Watch your words

You may have resigned because you have a negative feeling towards your employer or co-worker. It is still better to keep every complaint to yourself. Be careful in choosing words when stating your reasons for resignation, either directly or in social media. Bad-mouthing your boss or coworkers as the reason you resign will leave you with a negative impression. After all, who knows one day you should work together again with your boss or co-worker?

Return all the office property

Borrowing office properties during work is not a problem, the problem is when you resign and have not returned the office laptops or other properties. Do not forget to return these items before you leave.

Pay attention to ethics and your contract

Even if you are not working in your old office, you still have to keep your company and client confidential. Be aware of everything you have signed, such as non-disclosure agreements. There is no reason for you to divulge secrets relating to your company and clients. Be someone who can be trusted, so that later this does not complicate you if you want to apply for a new job elsewhere.

Say goodbye

You have work with them all the time, it is important to notify your departure to your colleagues, either directly or via email. This will not only give a good impression, as well as a notice in case they still have jobs related to you. In addition, use this opportunity to thank you for your opportunity to work and learn new things in your office.

Do not forget your clients

Don’t forget to inform your resignation to the clients or other parties outside the company that you have built relationships with as well. If there is someone who replaces your position, it’s good to introduce them to your clients. This will make it easier to transition your work. Your clients need to know who to call when you leave.

Keep in touch with your boss and co-workers

Don’t lose connection with your co-worker from your old office. No one will know what will happen in the future, will it? Maybe later on you will need your boss or coworkers. Connection can also be one form of investment in your career.

Whatever the reasons, you’ve made up your mind to resign and move on. It’s not easy, especially after many years of giving your all to your job and your coworkers. In any case, your first step is to draft a letter of resignation¯a sensitive move that if done improperly can have a strong negative impact on your future employment opportunities.

Writing a resignation letter must be done from your head, not your gut, even if it is your annoying job or your hated boss that made you write that letter. Remember: It’s a small world; whatever you write in that letter can play for you or against you when potential employers call up checking on you. Following are eight tips that will help you write an effective, elegant letter of resignation:

(1) Send a printed letter
Print the letter rather than hand-writing it, so your writing and details are clear, and there are no potential misunderstandings.

(2) Keep it brief
Start by mentioning the important details: date, addressed to the full name of your direct superior, headline, body, and your name and signature.

(3) Be formal and succinct
i.e. “After much thought, I have decided to move on and leave [Name of your Company].”

(4) Keep it positive
i.e. “I appreciate [company name] for giving me the opportunity to be part of your team. I wish you all the best and hereby inform you that I will be at your disposal before and after my departure for any matter that requires my assistance.”

(5) Mention prior notice
i.e.: “As per my employment agreement, I am obligated to give X days’ notice, making my departure date [day of week, date].”

(6) Sign it manually and keep two copies of the original
You may need them for future legal reasons.

Best Regards,
[your signature],
John Smith

(7) Proofread before sending
No matter how you see it, writing a resignation letter is a
formal procedure; it must be done accurately. A small grammar error, for example, can cause undesired misinterpretations that may have legal consequences. Professional grammar check software can help you with proofreading.

(8) Deliver it personally, in a sealed envelope
After doing so, make sure to notify at least one of your coworkers, as you never know how your employer may react. For legal reasons, it is a good idea to have a witness who can testify as to the date and time of your resignation.

Learn more about writing a resignation letter and other useful documents by using an advanced online grammar check software.

By Gill Lavi | Submitted On June 30, 2007

Whatever the reasons, you’ve made up your mind to resign and move on. It’s not easy, especially after many years of giving your all to your job and your coworkers. In any case, your first step is to draft a letter of resignation – a sensitive move that if done improperly can have a strong negative impact on your future employment opportunities.

Writing a resignation letter must be done from your head, not your gut, even if it is your annoying job or your hated boss that made you write that letter. Remember: It’s a small world; whatever you write in that letter can play for you or against you when potential employers call up checking on you. Following are eight tips that will help you write an effective, elegant letter of resignation:

(1) Send a printed letter – Print the letter rather than hand-writing it, so your writing and details are clear, and there are no potential misunderstandings.

(2) Keep it brief – Start by mentioning the important details: date, addressed to the full name
of your direct superior, headline, body, and your name and signature.

(3) Be formal and succinct

i.e. “After much thought, I have decided to move on and leave [Name of your Company].”

(4) Keep it positive

i.e. “I appreciate [company name] for giving me the opportunity to be part of your team. I wish you all the best and hereby inform you that I will be at your disposal before and after my departure for any matter that requires my assistance.”

(5) Mention prior notice

i.e.: “As per my employment agreement, I am obligated to give X days’ notice, making my departure date [day of week, date].”

(6) Sign it manually and keep two copies of the original – You may need them for future legal reasons.

(7) Proofread before sending – No matter how you see it, writing a resignation letter is a
formal procedure; it must be done accurately. A small grammar error, for example, can cause undesired misinterpretations that may have legal consequences. Professional grammar check software can help you with proofreading.

(8) Deliver it personally, in a sealed envelope – After doing so, make sure to notify at least one of your coworkers, as you never know how your employer may react. For legal reasons, it is a good idea to have a witness who can testify as to the date and time of your resignation.

How to resign elegantly

So, the time has come for you to move on to a new job.

There are many reasons an employee might leave a job.

Some employees resign because they are unhappy, because they have grown all they can at a role, or simply because they have been offered a new positions they cannot refuse.

Whatever the reason for your resignation, it is time to pen your resignation letter.

You could send a simple text saying “SRY NOT WRKING HERE N E MORE.” with a deluge of both smiling and frowning emojis.

You can write an email saying with the proverbial “Peace Out!

The worst thing you could do is quit like Scarface.

Penning a letter of resignation might be the most difficult thing you have done to date. However, if you are dedicated to your career, writing a resignation letter is not only the right thing to do; it is crucial to the forward movement of your career.

Before You Write The Letter

Before you even set out to write the letter, you may have already verbally notified your team and supervisors. Ideally, you would be able to resign in person, especially if you are in a good standing relationship with your boss.

In this scenario, simply notify your supervisor that you need to take a few minutes of his time in order have have a discussion.

We will dive deeper into the four simple elements of your letter of resignation. Verbally notifying your boss should reflect what will be included in your resignation letter.

At this time, tell your boss you are, indeed, leaving. Make sure to communicate your last day, your gratitude for the position and opportunity and what you are willing to do in the transition time between then and now.

You may be inundated with questions from your boss. You are not obliged to tell your boss where you are going, what salary you have been offered or any other personal details. However, if your supervisor is keenly interested in making you an offer to stay on board, you might explore those options. Be thoughtful about what you share during a resignation process.

Finally, consider this verbal notification a draft of your resignation letter, which your company may require you to write either way. Carefully plan out what you are comfortable sharing at this juncture.

How To Write The Letter of Resignation: The Basics

Writing a resignation letter, once you take the awkwardness of the situation out, is very easy.

The function of the resignation letter, after all, is to be a formal document of your transition out of a company.

Adding the human touch to it, ie. an expression of gratitude, will likely serve you well when seeking references down the line.

In addition, giving thanks is a decent human thing to do ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

A professional and informative resignation letter consists of four straightforward elements:

  • Greeting
  • Date when your resignation will be effective (ideally at least two weeks from the header date)
  • An expression of gratitude for opportunity
  • Transition offer / Signature

Sample Resignation Letter Template

Below is a free sample resignation letter template that combines all the points discussed previously. You can use this to get started.

Greeting: Dear [name(s)],

Date of Resignation: I am writing this letter to inform you of my resignation from my role as [position] effective two weeks from today, [date].

An Expression of Gratitude: I want to take this opportunity to express my deepest gratitude for what I have learned as an employee of [company].

In working alongside my team and under the leadership of [supervisor] I have gained a surplus of knowledge and experience. Thank you for this opportunity.

Best Wishes / Signature: I am happy to use the next two weeks to make the transition as smooth as possible. My best wishes for the future of [company].

Relationships & Tone of Resignation Letter

Now you know the basics of what to include in your resignation letter.

Before you set out to actually write your letter of resignation, consider the tone it will have.

To whom are you writing this letter?

Is your relationship friendly or a little rocky?

Consider the message you want to send in your resignation letter. If it is a message of gratitude, make sure you cite specific instances for which you are grateful. If you have a friendly relationship with the supervisor to whom you are writing, feel free to diver deeper into your appreciation, some memories and maybe even some heartfelt good wishes for the future.

Refer to this excellent collection of resignation letter templates that cover virtually all the bases. Whether you are retiring, changing lanes in your career or simply moving onto greener pastures, you are likely to find a resignation letter sample that can get you started.

Leave Negativity Behind

So, you hated your boss. Maybe she micro-managed your every move. Maybe she was so hands off you felt like you were navigating your job alone.

However you feel about a certain person, whether it be your boss or your teammates, try your damnedest to leave any negative emotion out of your resignation letter. This is not your chance to air all of your grievances and achieve some sort of vindictive closure.

If you are leaving a very toxic situation, get a second pair of eyes on your resignation letter. In lieu of expressions of anger, you might also fall into the trap of passive aggression within the body of the resignation letter. Having a second pair of eyes, especially when going through a shaky resignation, will ensure that your tone and language is perfectly professional.

Instead, focus on the good in your resignation letter.

In Conclusion

Of all the letters exchanged throughout a working employer-employee relationship, including the cover letter and the offer letter, the resignation letter can be a tough one to write.

Follow these guidelines to write a clear and thoughtful resignation letter. While this may be the technical end of your relationship to your supervisor or company, there is always a good reason to leave any/all bridges unburned. These will likely be the people you call upon as references when moving upward throughout your career.

These professional relationships, though tenuous at times, can be preserved in these final moments by writing a meaningful resignation letter.

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How to resign elegantly

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Telling your boss that you are leaving your job to accept another position can be challenging and intimidating. This is especially true if you enjoy your job and are simply leaving to take advantage of new professional opportunities or a substantial increase in pay. Make sure your approach is professional and sincere to ensure you don’t burn bridges that could be beneficial to you in the future.

Get the Details in Order

Don’t announce your resignation until you are entirely certain you have the new job, with a signed contract in hand. A good interview doesn’t necessarily mean you will be offered the job, and if you are, it may be some time before the position officially launches. It’s best to go into a conversation with your current boss with a specific timeline in mind, based on when the new employer wants you to start. Knowing these details gives you time to provide adequate notice and plan an exit strategy.

Tell Your Boss First

The office rumor mill can run rampant, so it’s vital that you not share news of your impending departure with colleagues before broaching the topic with your immediate supervisor. Make an appointment for a private meeting with your boss and draft a formal resignation letter that outlines your anticipated timeline for leaving. Regardless of whether you had a good or bad working relationship with your supervisor, this interaction should be professional and non-contentious.

Be Gracious and Professional

Begin your conversation with your boss by expressing your gratitude for the opportunity to work with him and with the company. Follow with the direct statement, “I’m here to give you my two weeks’ notice.” How you proceed from this point will be based on the relationship you have with your supervisor. If you had a rocky relationship or ongoing unresolved problems, you can give a pat reason for leaving such as, “I have decided to pursue other professional opportunities,” which keeps the conversation civil. If, on the other hand, you had a good working relationship, you may tell your employer that you found an opportunity you just couldn’t refuse, or that after long and hard consideration, you decided to take your career in a new direction.

Plan an Exit Strategy

After your initial resignation announcement, you will likely need to have additional meetings with your supervisor to iron out the details of your departure. It is in everyone’s best interest that you complete projects you have in the works or train someone to take up where you’re leaving off. Your supervisor may ask you to help train a replacement to ensure a seamless transition. You must also talk to your human resources officer about issues related to your final paycheck, discontinuation or transfer of benefits, and how you want to handle any investment or retirement account you have with the company.

How to resign elegantlyThis is the second and final article in the ‘I Quit’ series. These articles are meant to provide you with some insight into the resignation process from an employer perspective. In this article, I will discuss what happens (or should happen) after you tell your manager you are leaving the company.

As I mentioned in the first article, entitled, ‘I QUIT! The When and How of Resignation‘, I have accepted numerous resignations in my time as a business owner and manager, and the nature and tone of those resignations is as varied as the people working in and with my business over the past twenty years. After years of experience, I have concluded that, while there are many ways to quit your job, there are definitely right ways and wrong ways to take on this process.If you haven’t already read the first article in this series, you will want to do so. It covers the ‘when’ and the ‘how’ of the resignation process.

So, let’s talk about what happens during the time after you resign and before you leave the company. Once you deliver your resignation letter and meet with your manager, you might think the important steps are finished. But, there is much to be done, before you leave, and those tasks are important, not only for your employer but for your reputation and your professional future.

Before You Go

Once you have given notice, you can discuss your remaining time at the company. Those notes you took before the meeting will come in handy here. Make suggestions on how you might ease the transition. Can you train a particular person or team to take over responsibilities while your manager searches for a replacement? Is there someone in particular your manager might consider as your replacement? Could you train them? What projects do you need to complete? Outline the tasks and tell your manager what you expect to complete before your departure.

After you talk to your manager, and to HR and your team, resist the temptation to kick back and wait for your departure date. Get the work done. Do not disrupt the work process. If you are leaving because you are unhappy, do not engage in poisonous rhetoric in the break room or encourage others to leave. Do your job and impress others with your professionalism.

Before your last day, be sure all exit paperwork is complete, and that you have taken care of all benefits, experience certificates, relieve letters, etc.

After You Leave

Here is the point where I tell you why you want your employer to be happy! Whether your relationship with your prior employer was good or bad, your ex-manager, your teammates and colleagues will remember your professionalism.

You finished your last day at the company and you are moving on – hopefully to a great new job in a new company. Whether you know it or not everyone was watching you and judging how you handled the resignation process. Younger team members will learn from your behavior. Your old colleagues may leave the company and you may wish to hire them or have them considered for employment in your new company. They will WANT to work with you because they perceive you as being professional. Your ex-manager may become a client when you start your new business. You may be nominated for an industry panel or position by someone with whom you used to work. All of those things are possible and some are probable. Most of us work in a small professional community and our behavior and attitude follow us from one company and career experience to another. THAT is why you want your ex-manager to be grateful.

Oh, and one last thing before you update your resume and put that previous job in the rearview mirror! Keep in touch with your previous team, your ex-manager, your professional contacts. Call them and ask if they are going to an industry event and arrange to meet them there for a cup of coffee. Call to ask how they are doing. Call your manager a month or two after you leave and ask how things are going. Offer to answer any questions they might have. In short, be mature and professional, and make your old colleagues miss you.

How to resign elegantlyThis is the second and final article in the ‘I Quit’ series. These articles are meant to provide you with some insight into the resignation process from an employer perspective. In this article, I will discuss what happens (or should happen) after you tell your manager you are leaving the company.

As I mentioned in the first article, entitled, ‘ I QUIT! The When and How of Resignation‘, I have accepted numerous resignations in my time as a business owner and manager, and the nature and tone of those resignations is as varied as the people working in and with my business over the past twenty years. After years of experience, I have concluded that, while there are many ways to quit your job, there are definitely right ways and wrong ways to take on this process. If you haven’t already read the first article in this series, you will want to do so. It covers the ‘when’ and the ‘how’ of the resignation process.

So, let’s talk about what happens during the time after you resign and before you leave the company. Once you deliver your resignation letter and meet with your manager, you might think the important steps are finished. But, there is much to be done, before you leave, and those tasks are important, not only for your employer but for your reputation and your professional future.

Before You Go

Once you have given notice, you can discuss your remaining time at the company. Those notes you took before the meeting will come in handy here. Make suggestions on how you might ease the transition. Can you train a particular person or team to take over responsibilities while your manager searches for a replacement? Is there someone in particular your manager might consider as your replacement? Could you train them? What projects do you need to complete? Outline the tasks and tell your manager what you expect to complete before your departure.

After you talk to your manager, and to HR and your team, resist the temptation to kick back and wait for your departure date. Get the work done. Do not disrupt the work process. If you are leaving because you are unhappy, do not engage in poisonous rhetoric in the break room or encourage others to leave. Do your job and impress others with your professionalism.

Before your last day, be sure all exit paperwork is complete, and that you have taken care of all benefits, experience certificates, relieve letters, etc.

After You Leave

Here is the point where I tell you why you want your employer to be happy! Whether your relationship with your prior employer was good or bad, your ex-manager, your teammates and colleagues will remember your professionalism.

You finished your last day at the company and you are moving on – hopefully to a great new job in a new company. Whether you know it or not everyone was watching you and judging how you handled the resignation process. Younger team members will learn from your behavior. Your old colleagues may leave the company and you may wish to hire them or have them considered for employment in your new company. They will WANT to work with you because they perceive you as being professional. Your ex-manager may become a client when you start your new business. You may be nominated for an industry panel or position by someone with whom you used to work. All of those things are possible and some are probable.

Most of us work in a small professional community and our behavior and attitude follow us from one company and career experience to another.
THAT is why you want your ex-manager to be grateful.

How to resign elegantly

Oh, and one last thing before you update your resume and put that previous job in the rearview mirror! Keep in touch with your previous team, your ex-manager, your professional contacts. Call them and ask if they are going to an industry event and arrange to meet them there for a cup of coffee. Call to ask how they are doing. Call your manager a month or two after you leave and ask how things are going. Offer to answer any questions they might have.

In short, be mature and professional, and make your old colleagues miss you.

That’s the way to resign!

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Use this professional and formal sample resignation letter when you want to write a meaningful and heartfelt resignation letter.

How to resign elegantly

Regardless of your reasons for leaving your job, you will have gained something positive during your employment with the company. Focus on the positive and maintain a good relationship with your ex-employer.

You never know when you might need to refer back to this employer so take the time to write a very nice resignation letter.

Formal Resignation Letter Sample

Ms Jane Smith
Financial Director
XYZ Corporation
Address
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Ms Smith (or first name if you have an informal relationship),

Please accept this as formal notice of my resignation from the position of Accountant at XYZ Corporation, effective two weeks from today. My last working day will be Month Day Year.

After much consideration I have decided to accept another job offer. I feel it is time for a new challenge and this is a good opportunity to further my career goals.

Working for this company has been a wonderful experience. I feel privileged to have been part of such a professional team and will miss all my colleagues.

I appreciate both the professional and personal growth opportunities that have been provided to me during my time with the company. I would like to thank you in particular for all your advice and support. I hope that we will stay in touch as I begin this new chapter in my career.

I wish you and XYZ Corporation continued success in the future.

Best short and simple resignation letter

If you are looking for a sample resignation letter that is short and to the point but polite and professional you can use this basic sample resignation letter.

Go to the letter of resignation template to help format your letter of resignation. It is easy to fill in your own information and use any of the key phrases provided to complete a professional letter of resignation.

If you are leaving before securing a new position you can simply use the following phrase:

“I have decided to spend some time evaluating my career and exploring new opportunities”.

Be positive about what you have learned while in the job and how it will be of value in securing a new opportunity

How to resign by email

If the situation demands that you resign via email use this sample resignation email to help you.

Best sample resignation letters and emails

How to resign elegantly

RESIGNATION LETTERS

How to resign elegantly

RESIGNATION LETTERS

How to resign elegantly

RESIGNATION LETTERS

The job offer acceptance letter can be used to professionally accept your new offer of employment.

How to resign gracefully

Apart from submitting a polite and professional resignation letter there are certain steps to take to ensure you leave the company on the right note.

  • Easy-to-use resignation checklist will show you how to resign properly and professionally with a practical list of things that need to be done when resigning your job. Tick all the boxes and make a smooth exit from the company. Know your rights and obligations to the employer.
  • Say goodbye to your colleagues with a brief email. You can use this sample farewell email to help you.
  • It is important to make sure you secure a job reference from your employer before you leave. You will definitely need it sometime in your future career.
  • Are you expected to complete an exit interview before you leave? View exit interview questions to be well prepared.

Handling the resignation process professionally enables you to focus on the positive things you are moving toward rather than getting stuck in any negatives you are leaving behind.

Update – Frequently asked question about resigning

I am worried I will not get my final paycheck. What can I do if this happens?

If your regular paydate for the last pay period has passed and you have not been paid by your employer you can contact your State Labor Office and seek assistance with your non-payment issue.

Please Note. This sample resignation letter is provided for guidance purposes only. Resignation letters should be edited to fit your own personal situation.

How to resign elegantly

You’re almost there.

You’re nearly through drafting a formal letter. It’s not something you make a practice of every day—maybe it’s rare for you to go hundreds of words without an emoji—so this accomplishment will soon be cause for relief, or even celebration.

But first, there’s this pesky letter closing to hammer out. How do you find ways to end a letter, anyway?

Such correspondence typically begins with a flurry of formality: your address, the date, and the recipient’s address. The end of the beginning requires a salutation evoking a slightly more regal tip of the hat than just “Hey.”

Similarly, you need to know how to end a letter in a way that conveys gravitas, but without literally spelling out “This letter was written and sent by a functional member of society who knows how to accomplish things, including fancy letter closings.” Brevity is the better part of valor, a wise editor said.

The best letter closings have a matching tone to everything that’s come before it. If your letter is work-related, you’re probably trying to strike a balance: business-like but not overly brusque, personable but not suspiciously chummy. Here’s how to master many ways to end a letter like a professional.

Close your letter with one meaningful sentence

Whether you’re lining up a meeting, sending in a resume, or querying a potential resource, you want your letter to end in a way that makes it clear where you stand. Some examples:

  • I look forward to meeting you at the seminar on Tuesday, July 11.
  • Thanks for your consideration; please let me know if you have any questions.
  • My deadline is Friday, so I hope to get your perspective on this matter soon.
  • Your guidance has been invaluable, and I hope to work with you again soon.

You might want the person you’re contacting to immediately do something, like mark their calendar, start crafting an urgent response, or add you to the list of people they know to count on in the future. Occasionally, you may just want them to feel appreciated. Whatever that action is, make it clear in your final sentence.

How not to sign off a formal letter

Just as it was very important in sixth grade to not accidentally address your English teacher as “Mom,” it is crucial to not sign off your business letter with “love.” Or “fondly.”

Pause for a moment and imagine the recipient of your formal correspondence sitting at a mahogany desk, masterfully opening your envelope with an old-timey letter opener (who even has those anymore?) and reading in rapt attention until your ending, where you signed: “passionately.” What a delicious nightmare!

In this vein, you don’t want to be too casual when closing a letter. If you’re writing a friend, you can get away with an informal “-xo” or “ciao,” but with new work contacts, you’ll want to dial down your effusion to “warm regards,” “cheers,” or “Happy Friday.”

10 best letter closings for ending of a formal business letter

As a writer, you may revel in finding new ways to get your point across—to avoid communicating formulaically. But ending a letter is not an ideal venue for tinkering with language or otherwise reinventing the wheel. Just as such correspondence often begins with the tried-and-true salutation “Dear Person’s Name,” you should be comfortable using a variety of closing salutations. Take a look at some of the best business letter closings you will come across.

1 Yours truly

Like a navy blue jacket or a beige appliance, “yours truly” doesn’t stand out, and that’s good. The message here is “I think we can safely agree how I sign off isn’t the part of this letter that matters.”

2 Sincerely

Another sturdy option: literally, “I mean it.” Again, the purpose of these sign-offs is to unobtrusively get out of the way, and “sincerely” does the job.

3 Thanks again

If you’ve already said “thanks” once, why not say it again? Just be careful not to step on your closing sentence, if that also pertains to gratitude: you don’t want to botch the finale with an unwieldy “thanks again again.”

4 Appreciatively

This one can help you avoid overusing the word “thanks.” It also sounds less clunky than “gratefully.”

5 Respectfully

This one is tinged with deference, so make sure it suits the occasion. For instance, if you’re writing your landlord to enumerate a series of egregious failures and abuses and your closing sentence is “Unfortunately, if these deficiencies are not soon remedied, my next step may be legal action,” then ending with “respectfully” is awkward.

6 Faithfully

If “respectfully” is a little deferential, this one is a cut above. Again, make sure it’s right for the occasion. If you picture someone reading it and cringing, you have other options.

Like “sincerely” and “best,” this one is dependable and restrained, but it comes with a variety of optional accessories. Consider tricking it out with a gentle adjective, like so:

7 Best regards

If you’re concerned that “regards” alone may seem too stiff or pointedly neutral, go ahead and attach “best”—it’s like adding a polite smile.

8 Warm regards

“Warm regards” is one of a few sign-offs you can experiment with involving warmth. While a word like “warmly” assumes too much intimacy for initial correspondence, this route may prove handy once you’re more acquainted: warm wishes.

9 Kind regards

A final variation on the theme of “regards,” this classy number strikes a balance between formality and closeness. If you don’t want to be too friendly but are worried about seeming stuffy or standoffish, “kind regards” is a solid bet.

Some see “best” as flippant and hurried. Best what, anyway? Best wishes? Still, others argue it’s your best default option. Judge for yourself.

Once you’re in the habit of sending and receiving important emails and know how to end a business letter, you’ll develop an instinct for when such letter sign offs make sense and when they’re gauche.

In C#, a thread can be terminated using Abort() method. Abort() throws ThreadAbortException to the thread in which it called. Due to this exception, the thread is terminated. There are two methods in the overload list of Thread.Abort Method as follows:

  • Abort()
  • Abort(Object)

    Abort()

    This method raises a ThreadAbortException in the thread on which it is invoked, to begin the process of terminating the thread. Generally, this method is used to terminate the thread.

    Syntax:

    Exceptions:

    • SecurityException: If the caller does not have the required permission.
    • ThreadStateException: If the thread that is being aborted is currently suspended.

    Example:

    Output:

    Explanation: The above example shows the use of Abort() method which is provided by the Thread class. By using thr.Abort(); statement, we can terminate the execution of thr thread.

    Abort(Object)

    This method raises a ThreadAbortException in the thread on which it is invoked, to begin the process of terminating the thread while also providing exception information about the thread termination. Generally, this method is used to terminate the thread.

    Syntax:

    Here, the information contains any information that you want to pass in a thread when it is being stopped. This information is only accessible by using ExceptionState property of ThreadAbortException.

    Exceptions:

    • SecurityException: If the caller does not have the required permission.
    • ThreadStateException: If the thread that is being aborted is currently suspended.

    Example:

    Output:

    Important Points:

    • A deadlock can occur if the thread that calls Abort methods holds a lock that the aborted thread requires.
    • If the Abort method is called on a thread which has not been started, then that thread will abort when Start is called.
    • If the Abort method is called on a thread which is blocked or is sleeping then the thread will get interrupted and after that get aborted.
    • If Abort method is called on a suspended thread then a ThreadStateException is thrown in the thread that called Abort, and AbortRequested is added to the ThreadState property of the thread being aborted.
    • A ThreadAbortException is not thrown in the suspended thread until Resume is called.
    • If the Abort method is called on a Managed thread which is currently executing unmanaged code then a ThreadAbortException is not thrown until the thread returns to managed code.
    • If two calls to Abort come at the same time then it is possible for one call to set the state information and the other call to execute the Abort. But, an application cannot detect this situation.
    • After Abort is called on a thread, the state of the thread includes AbortRequested. After the thread has terminated due to the result of a successful call to Abort, the state of the thread is changed to Stopped. With sufficient permissions, a thread which is the target of an Abort can cancel the abort using the ResetAbort method.
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    Related

    • How to Send a Follow-Up Letter After Resume Submission
    • Can You Accept a Job Offer & Then Switch Jobs?
    • Sample Letter to Reject a Job Offer After Acceptance
    • Job Offer From a New Company: How to Talk to My Boss
    • How to Politely Turn Down a Job Offer I Already Accepted

    The emotional roller coaster of job hunting can be an unnerving experience with many unexpected twists and turns. The excitement of being offered a job – particularly on the spot – may cause you to accept a position before thinking it over. If that just happened to you and you’re already experiencing deep regret, don’t discount your feelings. Consider your options and then contact the company if the job or the timing is not right. Declining a job offer won’t burn bridges if handled diplomatically.

    Assess the Situation

    Second thoughts about a taking new job are normal. Discern whether you’re simply anxious about making a career move or if you truly can’t see yourself in that job or working for that employer. Perhaps, you overstated your qualifications in the interview and worry that you aren’t ready for that level of responsibility. Or maybe you don’t think you fit the organizational culture if you’re used to a very different style of dress, communication and expectations. Just be sure that you really don’t want the job before reaching out to the company.

    Contact the Hiring Manager

    A job offer cancellation letter from a company is impersonal and shocking. Similarly, an out-of-the-blue email from a new hire declining a previously accepted position is very unexpected. Although it may feel awkward, call and speak to the hiring manager or the person who offered you the job. When explaining your change of plans, express appreciation for the job offer and express gratitude for the opportunity to meet members of the team.

    Offer a brief explanation for your decision such as a family situation, worsening health problems or a desire to pursue a job that is more closely aligned to your long-term career goals. Refrain from speaking negatively about your interview experience or the team members you met. The Cut states that employers are used to applicants changing their mind about job offers so the conversation may go better than you think.

    Only send an email if you can’t reach the company official by phone. Avoid asking an administrative assistant to pass along a message that you have determined that you don’t want the job after all. A cancel offer letter by email is acceptable if the job was a remote position and your interview was virtual. Just make sure you receive an acknowledgement of your email so the employer isn’t expecting you to start work on Monday.

    Apologize for the Inconvenience

    The longer you wait to contact the company, the more upset they will be with you. Letters may have already been sent out to candidates who weren’t selected, which will require creating a new vacancy notice. Apologize over the phone for any inconvenience and later send an apology letter for cancellation of a job offer. If you signed any legal papers such as a teaching contract, review the document carefully and consult with a labor union representative or an employment attorney to understand the penalties you may face for possible breach of contract. According to the Iowa State Education Association, an employer may agree to release a recent hire from a job contract if a suitable replacement can be found without undue delay.

    Send Written Notification

    Follow up with a letter to the company restating that you will not be accepting the job that was offered to you. Again, express appreciation and mention that you benefited from learning more about the company and their products. If you ended things on a positive note, state that you hope to be considered for future positions that may be a better fit for your skill set if you don’t feel you were the best person for the particular job that was offered to you. Consider staying in touch with company representatives through social networking or professional meetings to keep the door open to possibilities down the road.

    CEO & Co-Founder of Alchimie Forever

    How to resign elegantly

    While some members of my family call me “L’Americaine” (i.e. “The American,” not sure if they mean it as a compliment or not. ), and while I think in some ways I am American, at the core, I feel European. French Swiss to be exact.

    Today in particular, I am feeling very European. Maybe it’s because I just drove 6 hours listening to my favorite French music. During my drive, I let the music take me home, and I thought about my godmother Dominique, an incredibly important figure in my life, and my style inspiration. I thought about everything she has taught me about style. When I leave the house, I always ask myself: If I were to run into Dominique on the street, would she approve of how I look. Forget about running into ex-boyfriends. she sets the standard. Here are the top lessons I learned from her:

    1. Perfect manners are the most elegant accessory any woman can have.

    2. A great posture gives any woman class, elegance and a slimmer look.

    3. Leaving things to the imagination is more elegant than putting it all out there. Think backless dresses rather than low-cut dresses.

    4. There is no excuse for imperfect grooming. Ever.

    5. Nails (hands): The most elegant nail length is short; the most elegant shape is a slightly square oval; the most elegant nail polish color for hands is clear; and there is nothing French about a “French manicure” (to be avoided at all costs, along with anything fake).

    6. Feet: pedicures are a must year round, not just when toes come out in the summer; all colors work.

    7. Groomed eyebrows make any face look more elegant; overly-groomed eyebrows will age you.

    8. Don’t save your jewelry for special occasions. Wear your diamonds, your pearls, your chunky necklaces to celebrate the fact that it is a random Tuesday.

    9. You always look more elegant holding a champagne glass than either a wine glass, a beer mug or a shot glass.

    10. You never look elegant smoking (no matter that Audrey Hepburn might disagree).

    11. You never sound elegant swearing.

    12. Drink water. Lots of it. Ideally, Contrex.

    13. It’s very hard to look elegant in cheap fabrics. It is much easier to look (and feel) elegant in fabrics such as linen or cashmere.

    14. It’s very hard to look elegant in any outfit if it doesn’t fit; fit is everything; find (and be kind to) a seamstress you love.

    15. Elegance is not about trendy outfits; it’s about finding styles, shapes, fabrics and colors that work for you and sticking to those.

    16. If you find the perfect pair of pants, buy it in multiples.

    17. If you find the perfect pair of heels, but it double.

    18. On the shoe note, don’t walk around in heels that need TLC or shoes that need polishing. (The same grooming rule that applies to your person applies to your shoes apparently.)

    19. A mysterious smile gives any woman elegance and sex appeal.

    How to resign elegantly
    Dominique Pibouleau, circa late 1960’s

    How to resign elegantly File photo: Tuxedos should be worn appropriately at most times

    When we talk of classic attires, a tuxedo has been the ideal choice for men on special occasions.

    Wearing a tux means elegance but this does not imply that it should be worn inappropriately.

    In order to respect the etiquette and traditions of wearing a tuxedo, here are some tips;

    When to wear a tuxedo

    A tuxedo has always been considered an evening outfit. Tuxedos and tails were considered the only appropriate attire for elegant evening events before the second world war. Regardless of the dress code, stick to wearing your tux for evening events. You’re only excused to wear a tux during the day if you have a busy diplomatic function during the day and an evening event.

    Where to wear a tuxedo

    Most formal events require tux as dress codes for guests usually indicating that it is a black-tie event. A tux can be worn at operas, private parties, proms and weddings.

    How to wear a tuxedo

    The tux jacket must strictly be single-breasted with a single-button front fastening. Lapels must be peaked or shawl. The color should be classic black, blue, white, or ivory.

    Shirts must be strictly white with a wingtip collar designed to be worn with a bow tie. It should buttonhole for cufflinks. Bow ties should be in black silk. A white bow tie can be used for a tailcoat.

    Avoid pants with lapels or pleats. Tuxedo pants should not have belt loops. Socks worn must be black and avoid shoes with too many details. A shiny black or matted shoe is preferable.

    Don’t just wear a tux. Respect the etiquette and feel the elegance.

    Don’t want the job? Here’s the professional way to let the employer down easy.

    How to resign elegantly

    Getting a job offer can be a joyous experience. However, there are times when you get an offer, but it’s not what you really want. Perhaps the pay is too low, or the work isn’t exciting enough. Whatever your reason, if you decide to not accept a position, then you should learn how to politely decline.

    Please don’t use the “it’s not you, it’s me” bit.

    You might find yourself wanting to make vague excuses in an attempt to let the employer down easy. But, similar to dating, if you’ve ever been told, “it’s not you, it’s ME,” then you know that’s the cowardly way out. You’re saying “no” to this job offer for a particular reason, and the employer will want to know what it is. That said, it’s how you explain what’s holding you back that will impact whether they’d ever consider you for a job in the future. Don’t assume you will never want to work there. The job market is a lot smaller than you think. Times change, and so do your needs. Thus, how you handle this rejection will determine whether they’d ever consider you again.

    Stick to the facts and be sincere.

    When we decide to not take an offer, it’s important to explain objectively why it isn’t a good fit for our career goals. As I always tell clients, think of yourself as a business-of-one who needs to make smart decisions so you can stay in business. Turning down a job opportunity means you feel it won’t help your career stay healthy and on track. For example, let’s say the pay they offered you is too low. What you don’t want to say is:

    “This offer is too low. I’m worth more and feel you don’t value my worth.”

    The response above sounds emotional and negative. Instead, you’d say:

    “Thank you for this offer. I’m so pleased you feel I’m the right fit for the role. That’s why it’s difficult to tell you this, but I must turn it down. Unfortunately, I have a certain income level I need to earn to cover my financial obligations. I couldn’t take this role without feeling concerned about my commitments. Again, I appreciate the offer and hope that you might consider me for future positions that might be a better fit. I really respect and admire the company and would love to work here someday.”

    By explaining truthfully the reason for your rejection, and sandwiching it in between gratitude and appreciation, you can make the rejection easier for the employer to accept. Better still, by telling them truthfully what’s holding you back, you might just find them willing to make some concessions on your behalf. Keep in mind, they just chose you for the job. The idea of going back to the drawing board to find another you isn’t all that exciting. At this point, they might decide meeting your criteria would be the faster, better solution.

    P.S. – No hiding behind email or text!

    One last piece of advice – never try to do this via email or text. Nothing screams, “I’m a coward,” more than not picking up the phone and telling the employer directly you can’t accept their job. It’s important they hear the sincerity in your voice. In fact, it could be this type of accountability and professionalism that gets them to want to make concessions you need to say “yes.” So, suck it up and call them – it’s the right thing to do!

    The Guffey Team

    Our students may not be in a position to write resignation messages anytime soon. After all, many are just beginning their professional careers. However, students benefit from examining well-written business documents closely and with guidance.

    Help your students understand the strategy by walking them through this excellent contemporary resignation letter written by Alex S. Jones, outgoing director at Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University. We’ve included both an annotated version of the letter and the original. Below is a suggested strategy for sharing this example of a real-world business document in your classroom.

    How to Introduce the Assignment

    A useful strategy is to ask questions to activate prior knowledge and to stimulate critical thinking. The following questions may be suitable for both purposes:

    • When might you write a resignation letter?
      A worker may have found a better job or wants to go back to school, for instance. Students may add other examples.
    • Why write a letter? Can’t you just talk to your supervisor?
      Yes, you will want to speak to your supervisor first, but it’s a good idea to create a record of giving notice verbally. A letter is appropriate in this situation because it’s a formal document that may end up in your personnel file. As a public figure, Mr. Jones faces much scrutiny. His farewell must be well-conceived.
    • Why should a resignation message be graceful and tactful?
      Smart workers don’t burn bridges. They are considerate and professional, which also means that they give sufficient notice as a courtesy to the employer. In an age of social media, rude behavior may follow a worker around. Conversely, professionalism is showcased in unprecedented ways online. Besides, past employers will be more willing to act as references when the separation is amicable.
    • Why does Alex S. Jones write such a long letter? Are all resignation letters long?
      As director, Mr. Jones owes it to his organization to write a detailed and extensive resignation letter. His executive position demands it. Also, he knew that his remarks would be made public. He clearly wanted to part on excellent terms and elicit goodwill.

    Not all resignation letters are long. Most letters of resignation may be brief and basic. They might confirm the date of resignation, offer help to prepare for the resignation, remind the employer of contributions and accomplishments, and end with thanks and a forward-looking statement.

    How to Proceed in Discussing the Model Documents

    First show the plain resignation letter. Read the document paragraph by paragraph with the class. Solicit students’ feedback after each section. Encourage students to use their gut feeling and common sense.

    Even a budding business communicator can tell whether the tone is friendly and positive or rude and negative, for example. The key is to train students to identify how the writer achieves that tone—which means he uses.

    After reading and discussing the entire document, you may want to show the annotated letter. Discussing the comments will reinforce the work the class as a whole has accomplished.

    Please share with us how the assignment worked for you and your students.

    Seven strange secrets to showing maximum respect.

    Posted December 13, 2012

    “You’re being disrespectful!” is an arresting accusation made as though you should never be disrespectful, as though everyone always deserves total respect. Being respectful is treated as synonymous with being nice, disrespectful as with sinning.

    And yet none of us can or should respect everything and everybody equally. To do so would be to surrender our powers of discernment, of evaluating the quality of one person’s views and actions as cleaner or better than another’s.

    To accuse someone of being disrespectful is itself an act of such discernment, judging one person more inappropriate than others. We can’t live by the watchwords “criticize critical people” without being hypocritical. After all, in criticizing the critical we ourselves are being critical.

    Some say the way out is to disrespect ideas and actions but not people, and yet, as you may have noticed, we can’t draw a clean line between people and their behavior, at least not one they’ll regard as clean. Snubbing my thoughts and actions could easily snub me. When the citizens of Syria voice their opposition to Bashar a-Assad, their president for using Scud missiles against them, he’ll feel personally snubbed, disrespected as a person, and well he should. The extreme proves the problem. A pure ban on disrespect is unworkable. We need a different approach to disrespect. Disrespect is not the sin it’s made out to be.

    I reserve for me and everyone else our powers of discernment, the right to employ the full spectrum from the highest respect to the lowest, from honoring a person as inherently credible, to taking their word and actions with a grain of salt, to monitoring them skeptically, to doubting them outright, to ignoring them, to fighting them, to fighting them to the death as I think befits Assad, the ultimate show of disrespect.

    Still, like everyone I prefer being respected to being disrespected and so, doing unto others, I want to show as much respect as possible, to live and let live to the extent I can. For that I have seven rules.

    1. Don’t ever say, “That’s disrespectful” as though disrespect were a sin: Using that tried and untrue way to shut people down is hypocritical and cheating. Admit that disrespect is necessary and inevitable rather than holding the double standard whereby your disrespect is just discernment, and other people’s is simply sinful.

    2. Don’t let your taste buds be the Supreme Court: We’re born discerning, grimacing disrespectfully at everything bitter. But some of what’s bitter turns out to be better than it tastes, so we should get beyond condemning everything that doesn’t immediately appeal to us. Cultivate careful powers of discernment, reasons why you disrespect what you do, reasons that surpass a baby’s whiny “I don’t like it!”

    3. Swap shoes: Before you do any serious disrespecting put yourself snugly in the shoes of the person you disrespect. Be fluently capable of making the best case possible for their position as though you were their talented lawyer and advocate. See things from their side. Live by the tautological watchwords “If I were you, I’d be doing exactly what you’re doing.”

    4. Localize the problem as much as possible: If it’s what they’re saying, say that you disrespect that and only that. If it’s what they do over and over, disrespect that and only that. Still, don’t assume that you can draw that clean line. They may be hurt and offended to their core even if you just show disrespect for a corner of their behavior.

    5. Walk away if you can: The saying, “Don’t fight with a pig, you’ll just get dirty and the pig likes it,” is a great reminder that if you can walk away, you should. Walking away from someone you disrespect is often the most respectful way to show your disrespect, not that it will necessarily be taken that way. And remember that sometimes you can’t walk away. The poor citizens of Syria can’t. Sometimes you’re stuck, morally obligated to fight with a pig even though you’ll just get dirty and the pig likes it.

    6. Recognize that disrespect is double-edged: Not conveying your disrespect can be as disrespectful as conveying it. When you humor people, you’re disrespectfully treating them as incapable of handling your disrespect. When you convey your disrespect, you’re honoring their capacity to live and learn from feedback. Saying or not saying what you think can be taken as both disrespectful and respectful, as is evident in the way people put us in a double bind demanding that we respect them by being honest with them, and yet also demanding that we respect them by being diplomatic with them. Respect their ambivalence and face into the tough judgment call we all have to make, truth or care, should you speak your truth or just express care by shutting up.

    7. Wear your self-confidence like a Hazmat suit: Ironically, the more self-certain you are, the more respectful you’ll be. Free from fear that other people’s beliefs will contaminate you, you don’t have to hose them down anxiously before their disease infects you. Conversely, the more you fear that their beliefs will rub off on you, the more urgently you’ll need to purge the air of them, an urgency they can easily interpreted as aggression.

    In sum, if you cultivate careful powers of discernment, stop feeling like it’s sinful to have those powers, face into the challenge of figuring out when to speak your mind and when to bite your lip, and calmly hold your cultivated opinions as not easily perturbed, you’ll be able to show disrespect as respectfully as humanly possible.

    Grant me the sharp tongue to express my disrespect when it will prove helpful, the bit lip to keep my disrespect to myself when it will prove harmful, and the wisdom to know the difference.

    Are you wanting to quit your job after only three months of employment? If so, it happens. But here’s what you should know about how it’ll impact your relationship with your current employer and potentially your future employers.

    Before you quit, assess your situation

    The first thing you need to do before you consider quitting your job after only three months is to understand whether or not you are quitting because of something that can be fixed. Can the situation be fixed if you speak with your manager? Knowing when to change jobs for good reason, comes with experience. If you can, you should give speaking to your HR department or manager about the situation a chance, first. Finding new employment will always be harder than trying to work with your existing employer. And they are much more inclined to want to work with you, as well.

    That being said, before you do that, try to examine your work with the company objectively. Do you think your employer is happy with your work? There’s potential that if you feel like quitting after such a short period of time, you both might not be feeling the chemistry. If that’s the case, it’s sometimes easier to cut the cord quickly.

    If your employer appreciates your work, you have an advantage

    Quitting after three months when you feel as though your employer is happy with your work actually makes the process of quitting after such a short period of time more difficult. That’s because they are going to feel more disappointment in having to replace you. And your managers are going to feel as though they potentially did something incorrectly. This is something that should be taken into consideration and communicated when you decide you want to quit your job so soon.

    If your employer isn’t happy with your work, you don’t have an advantage

    When your employer isn’t happy with your work, or you feel like there’s too much friction in the process of getting work done, then it might be easier to quit than you think. Most likely, your employer will be feeling the same pains that you are and will understand it, “Didn’t work out.” Employers understand this and even have a term for it, churn. A churn is when a certain percentage of employees are nearly consistently leaving, and a new set of employees are replacing them.

    How will this impact your career path

    For the most part, leaving a job so soon won’t affect your future. But it won’t be something you’ll be able to put on the resume. For future employers, it might indicate that you are difficult to work with or potentially disloyal. The advice would be to leave this piece of employment off your record. You can skip it when it comes to your resume. If you decide not to leave it off, you will have to be sure that you clearly, calmly, and unemotionally can communicate to future employers why you left your previous job so quickly.

    Some of those reasons can be as simple as:

    • I wasn’t happy in that role.
    • I decided it was time for me to make a job function change and there wasn’t an opportunity within the company.
    • It simply didn’t work out, both myself and the senior leadership team left on amicable terms.

    Leaving after 3 months is becoming more common

    In active job markets, such as Los Angeles, New York, and San Francisco, the rate at which employees are changing jobs or companies they are employed by is accelerating. This is because there is a flourishing opportunity to work for technology startups and more job opportunities. Because of this change in the market over the past 5-years, it is not uncommon for someone to leave a job after only three months because they found a better opportunity elsewhere.

    Pro tip: TalentNow reports that 40% of employees surveyed in 2018 mentioned that they plan on changing jobs in the next year. This means more employers are seeking employees who may be a more stable and long-term hire.

    You’ll need to break the news to your employer

    However you navigate the conversation of leaving to your existing employer, it’s important that you keep it short, sweet, and to the point. Make sure that if the situation is that you both feel unhappy with the performance in the position, that you don’t make the focus on that. State to your manager that you don’t feel it’s working out and you’d like to make a change.

    In most circumstances, if you incorrectly estimated your employer’s happiness of working with you, they’ll bring it up correctly in that conversation. And it’s not uncommon for them to offer you higher compensation to stay if that’s the reason for your leaving.

    In the ideal world, you should stay with a company for at least one year, two years, to more ideal. The reason for this is that it communicates to future employers that you are easy to work with, you are committed to the companies that you say you want to be employed by, and challenges don’t deter you. It is also the correct amount of time required for you to truly make an impact or significant contribution to an established organization, which you’ll be able to present and share with others.

    For those trying to leave their first job ever only after three months, the advice would be not to. Try to “stick it out” for at least 6-months or 12-months so that you can have some work experience to be able to bring to other opportunities.

    A belief system rooted in savvy action. A fundamental shift in how we approach our business and our life as creative entrepreneurs.

    In 4 weeks, we’ll lay a new foundation for the way you work and live.

    This is not a “How to start a business course”. We dance beyond the “how to’s”, and into your head and heart — how to shift your mindset, prioritize, lead with grace, stop chasing and start choosing those things you want to be and feel.

    Together, we’ll explore the art and science of spacious business.

    This ain’t a feel-good fluff course. We get into the technical nitty gritty. I teach launch equations, financial breakdowns, and bring in an all-star lineup of experts on everything from managing your team to diversifying revenue. You’ll get action steps, detailed game plans, and more.

    It’s time to stop waiting for things to get easier, and start intentionally creating ease.

    There’s no “magical tipping point” that will suddenly make running a business less stressful. Some of the biggest industry names I know are still struggling with staff turnover, credit card debt, and exhaustion.

    That’s why Elegant Excellence is my commitment to discover, model and teach a better way. It’s your invitation to both a vocation that fulfills and inspires you, and a life that prioritizes breathing room, relationships, health and your joy.

    These are the lessons that changed my life – all while growing my revenue by 500% in 2015.

    While my journey is far from finished, Elegant Excellence is completely transforming the way I work and live. I’ve learned how to make space for joy and adventure. How to prioritize being present for the people in my life, and staying happy and grounded amidst the inevitable storms of business.

    It’s all shifted. And it’s changed everything.

    I promise: you can create this life, too. But you must take action.

    I want to turn everything I’ve learned and implemented over into your hands, so you can stop dragging yourself through deadlines, launches, your days.

    4 min read

    How to Avoid Failing Elegantly

    By NAIFA on 7/10/12 1:56 PM

    Topics: Grow Your Business

    Why do so many talented organizations with clear goals fail to win victories that should have been easily within their grasps? It’s because they’ve been infected with the disease I call “failing elegantly.”

    This debilitating syndrome sets in when people stop believing they can be successful and start devoting their energy to how best to lose. The driving elements of failing elegantly are 1) having a sophisticated explanation for the loss 2) making sure we appear to have tried everything in our power to avoid the outcome. But what is forgotten is this harsh reality: There are no style points for second place.

    Here are a few leadership mistakes that put your team in danger of failing elegantly, and some remedies to get them back into the winner’s mindset.

    Setting impossible goals

    Leading the goal-setting process to arrive at objectives that are perfectly sized is very tricky, but it has never been more important to success than it is in today’s geographically dispersed, virtual organizations. Taskmasters and pacesetting leaders need to learn the fine line between an invigorating challenge and a wholly deflating expectation, and to realize that everyone on the team may not share their level of maniacal commitment.

    While top performers are inspired by “stretch” goals that seem slightly out of their reach, smart team members will not waste their time training for a “three- minute” mile. Goals that are clearly beyond any reasonable confidence of achievement are worse than easy goals—they actually disengage your team’s energy. The predictable and natural response is “Why bother?”

    Letting people get pseudo-wins by “majoring in the minors”

    Very talented people can lose focus on the critical problems that must be solved to transform an idea into reality. Those are often the knottiest problems, and sometimes we resist them for a period of time, preferring to create some satisfying momentum on simpler tasks, or on tasks that are simply more fun.

    Tolerating “The dog ate my homework” and other common excuses

    In an organization, too much tolerance can be dangerous, mainly because without a clear line in the sand defining acceptable and unacceptable, a blurred line between success and failure follows. When you’re failing elegantly, for example, you tolerate “The dog ate my homework” and other classic excuses. No results plus a good excuse is presented in lieu of results—and tolerated. Massive amounts of energy are poured into sophisticated justifications and rationalizations for certain courses of action, and there is veiled blame for everything outside the team’s control.

    What you want, and what the winner’s mindset demands, are insightful explanations for the gap between expected and actual performance. These are informed guesses—as informed and objective as they can be, untainted by the effort expended in dodging responsibility. There is tolerance of the simple fact that we don’t have control over every variable in the game, so at times, through either forces outside our influence or simply not having run our best play, the results are not as we wish.

    Allowing sloppiness and imprecision

    The nice guy in you wants to avoid the perception of being too tough and will politely look the other way or catalog it away with some good-natured humor, allowing a report to be incomplete or some shoddy work to pass as acceptable.

    Leaders want to be good people, and they want to show others that they have the wisdom to accept human frailty. So they allow themselves to tolerate a little sloppiness here and a little imprecision there in their subordinates’ work. But high-reliability organizations never allow sloppiness because they know it equals death. Unusually excellent leaders have a zero tolerance policy for sloppiness.

    Encouraging “editorialized” data

    One area where failure can take hold is in the feedback process. Leaders, being eternal optimists and enthusiasts, also have a tendency to signal, often unconsciously, their dislike of bad news, their inner revulsion toward failure. When that happens—especially when that leader hasn’t regularly established an absolute demand for accurate, objective data—subordinates will begin to shape and color the data to meet the leader’s hopeful expectations and emotional needs, rather than the leader’s intellectual needs. The feedback data starts becoming corrupted, and that, in turn, begins to undermine the overall strategy—until the likelihood of success itself begins to plummet.

    Unusually excellent leaders demand that performance feedback data be delivered promptly and be objective, plentiful, and robust. This data is used to figure out what is working and what isn’t, so that corrections to course and speed can be made.

    Failing to measure what matters

    The right metrics will serve you in useful ways. As the Crosby Quality Institute reminds us: You will get what you inspect, not what you expect.

    Measuring what matters is perhaps the highest use of leadership authority in leading the domain of execution. Once the plan is set, the resources and funding are committed, and the action starts, there is mostly just feedback and response to the unknowns of the battle to be managed.

    The one thing you must have to make the real-time course corrections that will inevitably be required is good data. Invest in the design and the machinery required to gather, analyze, and present the data you need—quickly, accurately, and easily.

    Allowing an absolute commitment to winning to slip

    A tolerance for excuses, corrupt data that compromises strategy, and a distorted view of what is really happening “out there” is akin to boiling a frog one degree at a time. The frog can’t tell how hot the water has gotten until it is dead. But if you put all these factors together and add the heightened sense of urgency that always characterizes the execution phase, you’ll have plenty of the necessary ingredients in place for systematic failure. The key factor is the resignation and rationalization that occurs when we conclude that winning seems out of reach.

    Passive acceptance of failure, together with the rationalization that always goes with it, is a cancer that can begin anywhere in the organization, then metastasize to every office, including your own. You can prevent it by setting clear and precise standards of behavior for everyone on the team, as well as clear consequences for the violation of those standards. And you can control it through continuous and open communication with every member of your team.

    How to resign elegantly

    Safe and Elegant

    Step Downs are not safe features in a home unless designed well. They are random steps from one room to another that create a multi-level feel in one-story homes. These are very common in most older Florida Homes. Unfortunately, these step-downs create a real safety challenge, and taping yellow industrial ribbons across the steps is not an elegant design touch to any home.

    So, here are some ideas of how we accomplish both safety and elegance.

    How to resign elegantly

    When we bought our very first home in Florida years ago, we tripped when we first moved in. Almost every guest tripped as well. Over time we got used to the floor plan, but we learned to give a warning to our guests.

    History

    Florida architects in the mid-1900s designed many homes with step-downs, especially in the transition from the Dining Room to the Living area. Ideally, if your ceilings are higher than 8.5 feet, you can fix this tripping hazard by simply adding concrete to level the floors. However, in most Florida homes, the ceiling is only 8 feet tall. Therefore, if you raise the floor, the original 8- ft ceiling becomes nearly 7- ft. from the floor, which is uncomfortably low.

    Today’s style has changed dramatically. It is more commonly desired to have wide-open spaces in a home. Gone are the lower ceilings and soffit ceilings above bathrooms and kitchens. Cozy niche rooms are replaced with fewer walls and tall ceilings. These are easy renovations, but the step-downs are a real challenge.

    Over time, we figured out an affordable, discreet, and successful way to make this transitional step safe and elegant.

    • Change the olor to the adjacent floor,
    • Create a different design pattern on the floor,
    • Add plants to highlight a change, or
    • Add rugs.

    Updating for Safe Design

    Notice in the above photo we incorporate all bulleted features. This home was a real challenge because there were 2 step downs, from the entrance to the kitchen and dining area, and a second step down into the living area. To create a safe transition but instill beauty, the entrance floors were laid in brown wooden herringbone, while the kitchen and dining area featured a white wood-plank pattern. Next, the room changes color to the brown wood-plank design but finally returns to the brown wood herringbone pattern for the delayed step down.

    With these visual aids, our employees, subcontractors, and guests quit tripping and falling at these floor transitions.

    If you have wood floors, lay a border before and after the step down in a contrasting color to emphasize a floor level change.

    It is surprising how the smallest changes can make the most significant difference for a safe and elegant home.

    How to resign elegantly

    Close your eyes and picture your dream life. Are you winding your way through cobblestone streets in Prague? Or maybe you’re in a modern, upscale apartment in NYC making dinner with friends? Whatever way you define your luxurious life, there’s one question you have to ask yourself: do I know how to get there?

    Most times, this is the point where people give up, even though they never really started. The burden of trying to find a way seems to heavy to shoulder. You’ll never achieve that luxurious lifestyle with that attitude, though, so ditch it at the door.

    If you feel like you’re spinning your wheels on attaining that dream breakthrough that will put you on top, below I have listed a step by step process on how to live that luxurious life.

    Here are 5 steps you can take to getting on the right track :

    1 . Define exactly what you want

    Life is full of choices, and most likely, you won’t ever be able to have everything you want. But with some planning and thinking, you can get some of your desires within reach. The key to finding a path to a luxurious lifestyle is to define what ‘luxurious’ means to you. Basically, it can be broken down into two basic categories: experiences and materials.

    With experiences, you can’t hold them in your hand because they aren’t tangible. A backpacking trip to Europe would be the experience; the awesome coffee mug you buy to drink out of every morning as a souvenir would be the material. Knowing exactly what you want in life and what you define as a luxury item or experience will lead you to the next step.

    “Success is not the key to happiness. Happiness is the key to success. If you love what you are doing, you will be successful.” – Albert Schweitzer

    2 . Know what you can live without

    As stated above, chances are, you’re not going to get everything you want. You’ll have to figure out what you’re willing to live without . You may really want that beach body for the next summer season, but you might not be willing to sacrifice your obsession for late night pizza binges. You have to weigh the pros and cons of your choices and suffer the consequences.

    3 . Get creative with money

    You probably already know this, but most things in life aren’t cheap. If you haven’t already, assess exactly what your monthly budget is for all of your necessities, like rent, utilities and groceries. Maybe you find that a necessity can actually double as a luxury item. You’ll need a place to live, so why not pay a little extra to splurge on that luxury, fully-furnished apartment you’ve been drooling over?

    You’ll always need food, so split the membership cost for a bulk food store like Costco or Sam’s Club with friends or family members. There are two ways to think of saving money: incentives and disincentives. If you’re driven by incentives, you’ll find it easy to put money aside just at the prospect of achieving your goal of a luxury item or experience.

    If over six months, you save $1,000, set a reward, like grabbing coffee or lunch with a friend. Disincentives come in handy to put some extra pressure on. For example, if you plan to save $100 a month for six months to put toward a Mac Book Pro at the end of the year, make a bet with a few roommates or friends who also have goals in mind. If one or some of you fail to meet your goals, there must be consequences: trash removal for a month, cooking dinner for two weeks, or keeping the apartment spotless for a week.

    4 . Cut out the negatives

    Envy and jealousy lurk around many corners. Don’t fall victim to their traps. If a friend repeatedly keeps telling you that it’s stupid to save money for a one-week trip to Europe, ask them to specifically define why. Unless you are paying for it all on your credit card and have no means to pay it back, find a way to deal with them or simply eliminate them from your master plan. As long as you are confident in your path to living that luxurious lifestyle and you have a game plan to get there without going into loads of debt, no one needs to be butting into your business.

    “The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, the determination that whether we win or lose, we have applied the best of ourselves to the task at hand.” – Vince Lombardi

    5 . Stay focused

    This last item may seem obvious, but staying focused on saving can be the most difficult part . One day, you’re shopping for essentials, and these shoes pop out at you from the clearance rack with a tag that says $29.99. You reach out to snatch them before someone else does, but then you feel something in the pit of your stomach: guilt. Listen to it. All it takes is one shirt or a new video game to derail your savings plan for the thing you really desire. Treat yourself to small things, like coffee at a local bookstore or a walk in the park, but keep them free or extremely low budget if your piggy bank doesn’t have that much fat to pull from.

    Finding your way into the luxurious lifestyle may seem daunting, but with a few simple lifestyle and attitude changes, you’ll find yourself on the path to success in no time!

    This site offers 317 resignation letter templates for many situations. You can copy and paste the appropriate letter into your word processor. In addition, each letter of resignation is available to download in Microsoft Word format.

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    DISCLAIMER: The resignation letters and articles contained on ResignationLetters.biz are not to be considered as legal advice. All content is for informational purposes, and Savetz Publishing makes no claim as to accuracy, legality or suitability. The site owner shall not be held liable for any errors, omissions or for damages of any kind.

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    How to resign elegantly

    How to resign elegantly

    I captured these two shots from Transformers Dark of the Moon.

    The lady was pissed when addressed as “Ma’am”. However, Colonel Lennox surely meant no disrespect, as military protocol advises that officers may use “sir” or “ma’am” when addressing anybody.

    My question is: In real life, if I don’t know her name, real age or occupation, how should I address a lady like her in an elegant way without offending her?

    How to resign elegantly

    How to resign elegantly

    9 Answers 9

    This fictional character is sensitive about her appearance. She used to look young. She was either addressed as “Miss”, or by her name. (Possibly with “Miss”, or “Ms.”, or “Mrs.”, or another title at the beginning of her name.) Now that she looks older, she is sometimes addressed as “Ma’am”, or by her name. She associates the term “Ma’am” with older people, and hears it from people who do not know her well.

    ‘Do I look like a “Ma’am”?’ could be friendly, if said face-to-face with a smile.

    But in this context (where she is avoiding looking at the person she is talking to), it is quite rude. Granted, she had already said twice to quit calling her “Ma’am”, so she was definitely provoked.

    If one wanted to be even ruder than this fictional character, one could reply ‘No, you look like a bitch. I said “Ma’am” to be polite.’ That would be a risky approach — it could earn her respect, or it could “piss her off”, or both.

    A politer approach would be to assume that “Ma’am” is a polite title with which to address a woman, but to be prepared to stop saying “Ma’am” if she hints that she does not appreciate being called “Ma’am”. ‘Stop with the “Ma’am”‘ is much stronger than most hints.

    In almost any case, “ma’am” is a completely appropriate way to address a woman, even in the military.

    In this scene, the dialogue is being used as a device to reveal a specific aspect of the woman’s character. She is being portrayed as a gritty, tough-as-nails leader who disagrees with the convention of calling female officers “ma’am” (as it may carry connotations that she dislikes). As you can see, the gentleman was calling her ma’am according to convention and was somewhat caught off guard by her outburst.

    To quote one of the answers posted here:

    Sir is for men. Most women would be offended if you called them sir (with the possible exception of some supreme feminists). Like John M. Landsberg commented, “Ma’am” is what you want to use unless you’re asking for trouble.

    In real life, please do address a stranger as “ma’am.” In most cases you will be regarded as quite the gentleman. Where I am from (Central Valley, California), it is more respectful than “miss”, which is how third grader might address their teacher.

    How to resign elegantly

    This is a British / American divide.

    In the U.K. “Miss” is apparently used indiscriminately, regardless of age.

    In the U.S., at least in my region, young women are addressed as “Miss” and once you pass “a certain age”, you become “Ma’am”. Additionally, “Ma’am” is used as a mark of respect for authority or age, so even before a woman has reached “a certain age”, someone younger or below her in station may address her as “Ma’am”. (I was 23 when I was first “Ma’am-ed”.)

    Generally, it’s taken as a mark of respect (altho my first “Ma’am-ing” made me sad), so the character calling her “Ma’am” doesn’t really have anywhere else to go from there.

    To answer your question, the “elegant” form of address would likely avoid both “Miss” and “Ma’am”. Perhaps “Ms. X” instead.

    How to resign elegantly

    I assume that the character in this movie was offended at being addressed as ma’am because she thought that was how one would address an older individual, or someone who is a stickler for protocol. If you don’t know someone’s name or occupation, and you are unsure whether they might take offense at being addressed as sir or ma’am, simply omit it. For example, instead of:

    Excuse me, may I speak with you?

    The referent should be obvious from the context of the situation.

    Another way of doing this is to say:

    If the person volunteers their name without turning down your request, it generally serves as a tacit indication to continue the discussion. Don’t forget to get that interrogative intonation right on the end.

    How to resign elegantly

    I think there’s some deep context that is worth knowing.

    Elegantly addressing a woman has become old-fashioned in most situations. “Ma’am” is still conventional for the military. It is still conventional in some customer-service jobs, but this is fading out. It isn’t really used in day-to-day life — doing so is quite old-fashioned, or considered overly supplicating, or may even cause offense.

    For a rule of thumb, just avoid elegantly addressing a woman unless you’ve been told to by an employer, and when you do it will usually be “ma’am”.

    The soldier did the conventional thing for his job, but the reason the woman is not considered to have gone totally out of line is because (A) she is his superior, and (B) as stated above, elegantly addressing a woman is considered archaic by most. Some of the audience will see her as tough, humorous and defiant of outdated conventions, though some of the audience will see her as quick to anger, rude and insecure.

    The “deep context” I want to get to here is that gender relations have become quite strained in the western world. Addressing or referring to a woman in any matter has the potential to raise problems. For example, all of the following have raised issues for me or people I know:

    • “girl” — can be taken as saying that she is immature, or inferior to men
    • “woman” — can be taken as saying she is old, or that you are trying to score points by not saying girl
    • “female” — has overly clinical connotations, can be taken as creepy or objectifying
    • “lady” — usually considered old fashioned, or sucking up too much, sometimes to the point of being considered creepy
    • “ma’am” — as above
    • “miss” — in some cases disrespectful because it implies youth or inferiority, and in some cases old-fashioned/awkward because it’s what a child calls their teacher
    • “she”/”her” — disrespectful compared to her name
    • “chicks” — taken as disrespectful, implies objectification or inferiority, avoid this
    • “love”/”doll”/”babe”/”sweetie”/”honey” — extremely old fashioned, taken as disrespectful, implies objectification or inferiority, absolutely avoid (unless she is your partner, then it’s usually okay, though again a few will be offended)

    At the same time, you could use any of these words and never run into any trouble (except the last set).

    It’s a potential minefield even for native English speakers. There is a lot of nuance and context to understand, and something that pleases one person will upset another. Fortunately, most people are quite forgiving, especially if English is not your first language. Just be aware that someone may get offended no matter what word you choose to use — if this does happen, it’s better just to apologize and move on than dive into such a sensitive issue.

    ALT+F4 or close window button, is not the right solution to close the windows command prompt correctly!

    1.) . Right way to close the command Prompt!
    2.) . The help file for EXIT command of windows command prompt!
    3.) . When is a CMD / command prompt command finished?
    4.) . With some running commands you can use key combinations!

    1.) Right way to close the command Prompt!

    If you want to close the command prompt via right way, use the EXIT command in windows command prompt!
    or Exit with exitCode!

    (Image-1) correctly close, the window command prompt!
    How to resign elegantly

    2.) The help file for EXIT command of windows command prompt!

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.22000.258]
    (c) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

    C:\Windows\system32> exit /?
    Quits the CMD.EXE program (command interpreter) or the current batch
    script.

    EXIT [/B] [exitCode]

    /B specifies to exit the current batch script instead of
    CMD.EXE. If executed from outside a batch script, it
    will quit CMD.EXE

    exitCode specifies a numeric number. if /B is specified, sets
    ERRORLEVEL that number. If quitting CMD.EXE, sets the process
    exit code with that number.

    The command to exit the Cmd.exe correctly is suitable for: Windows 11, 10 , 8.1, 8, 7: Pro, Home, Enterprise, Basic, Premium, Professional, Starter, Ultimate, Windows-Server 2019, 2016, 2012

    3.) When is a CMD / command prompt command finished?

    The rule is that the command prompt shows the same line / path before executing / starting the command!

    (Image-2) When is the command ended in the cmd!
    How to resign elegantly

    4.) . With some running commands you can use key combinations!

    Here in the example the “tree /f” command on drive c:/

    1. Cancel with the key CTRL + C

    2. And exit the input prompt correctly with the command “exit”

    How to resign elegantly

    Telling a candidate they didn’t get the job is possibly the worst part of conducting a job search. But knowing how to turn a candidate down nicely and effectively is an important part of being a hiring manager. You need to bring on the most qualified applicants for the good of your company, but this naturally means saying “no” to most of the people who apply for the position, and telling a candidate they were not selected is part of the process.

    However, there is a polite way to say no to a candidate that will leave neither of you unhappy. Telling a candidate they didn’t get the job in a mature, professional manner will reflect well on you as an employer, keep the applicant from becoming discouraged or upset, and preserve your company’s positive reputation. Remember, sites like LinkedIn and Glassdoor make it possible for disgruntled applicants to post about their experiences. You want even rejected candidates to feel like they were listened to, considered thoughtfully, and let down politely if they didn’t make the cut.

    Respect the Time the Applicant Has Put into the Process

    When deciding how to tell someone they didn’t get the job—in person, by phone, or by email—consider the stage of the process they’ve reached, the efficiency of communication, and the degree of encouragement you want to offer. Between crafting customized cover letters, résumés, and CVs and preparing for and going to interviews, candidates invest a lot of time in the companies that ultimately reject their applications. The polite way to say no to a candidate is to ensure they see that you respect their time. This means informing them as soon as possible, being as straightforward as possible, and treating them with respect.

    How to tell someone they didn’t get the job by phone

    When determining how to tell someone they didn’t get the job by phone, timing is paramount. Call as soon as you know this person is no longer being considered. Start by thanking them for their interest in the company and for the time they invested in their application. Then simply say that after a thorough review of the materials, the selection team decided to go in a different direction. End by thanking the candidate again for their time and interest, wishing them well, and encouraging them to apply for positions relevant to their experience in the future.

    How to tell someone they didn’t get the job by email

    Of all the ways how to tell someone they didn’t get the job, by email is probably the most impersonal and least encouraging. However, it’s an appropriate way to communicate with a person if you don’t plan to take the application process further and invite that person for an interview. So if you’re wondering how to tell someone they didn’t get the job by email, follow the tips for how to tell someone they didn’t get the job by phone: respond quickly, be succinct and straightforward, and thank them for their time.

    How to tell someone they didn’t get the job in person

    Telling a candidate they were not selected in person is not something you’ll be faced with often. Typically, the process of deliberating happens after all the applicants have gone home. However, if the applicant is someone already working within the company, the polite way to say no to a candidate will be to pay them a personal visit.

    So if you’re wondering how to tell someone they didn’t get the job in person, keep it simple. Make the encounter brief, and get right to the point. Review the other tips on how to tell an applicant they are not hired, and use them. End with a compliment and some encouragement to reapply or a suggestion about what skills the applicant should look into acquiring to make the next application more successful.

    How to resign elegantly

    Remember Your Company’s Image

    What you say when you’re telling a candidate they didn’t get the job is terribly important because it will linger in the disappointed applicant’s mind for a long time—and it will profoundly influence how that person talks about your company in the future. Don’t turn what could be a positive contact into a burned bridge. Part of knowing how to turn a candidate down is remembering that you represent your company, not just yourself.

    Emphasize your respect for the applicant’s time.

    The hiring team would like to thank you for the time and effort you put into your application.

    Thank them for considering your company.

    We very much appreciate your interest in the position of [job title] here at [Company Name].

    Invite them to keep your company in mind for future openings.

    We encourage you to apply for future open positions that are a good fit for your experience and background.

    Minimize the Possibility of a Lawsuit

    What to say if the applicant presses for a reason

    When you’re telling an applicant they didn’t get the job, some may ask for a reason. Offer specific feedback that doesn’t mention unchangeable things like their voice or age. When determining how to tell an applicant they are not hired, start with two or three specific positives and then offer them something that didn’t work that they can change for future interviews.

    For example, if they were late—and if that factored into your decision—explain that if they were running late for the interview, they should have called to let you know.

    What to say if the applicant asks about other candidates

    If, after being rejected, the applicant asks about other candidates for the job, kindly explain that there was another candidate whose experience was a better fit for the position. Point out that privacy laws prevent you from discussing applicants with one another.

    How to avoid getting into the details of why the candidate was rejected

    When considering how to tell someone they didn’t get the job, focus on general reasons rather than getting bogged down in specifics. Candidates want to know why, but sometimes there isn’t a good answer, and it’s best to stick with a vague but honest “Someone else was a better fit.”

    With these tips, you can be sure that you’re telling a candidate they were not selected without any awkward, uncomfortable, or legally precarious situations arising. Hopefully, these ideas will make this task a little bit less difficult now that you know some of the ways to let a candidate down more easily and in a way that doesn’t harm your company’s good standing.