How to start a career in information technology

By Benjamin Todd · Published February 6th, 2015

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By Benjamin Todd · Published February 6th, 2015

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80,000 Hours: Oxford recently hosted a panel on careers in technology, co-hosted with Codelaborate, featuring four people who did arts degrees but ended up working in tech and loving their jobs.

We think tech is one of the most promising sectors, so are interested in how to start a career in technology, even if you come from an arts background. Here’s some rough notes I made on the panel (note that they may not accurately reflect the views of the panel and haven’t been checked by them).

The panel included:

  • Matt Clifford – studied Ancient History at Cambridge before doing a degree at MIT, worked in strategy consulting but quit to start Entrepreneur First
  • Jackson Gabbard – studied English at a small college in the US but was one of the first engineers at Facebook London
  • Nabeel Qureshi – studied PPE at Oxford, worked in consultancy but now works at startup GoCardless
  • Steven Shingler – studied double bass at the Royal College of Music in London, but now works at Google as an engineer.

How did they end up in tech, and what clues might there be for other arts graduates who want to go into the sector?

  • All had, at some point, taught themselves computer programming.
  • The two software engineers stumbled across it by accident (one wanted to design a website for a friend’s band and another wanted to set up a printer network to print promotional materials), but quickly found themselves obsessed, working long into the evening trying to get things to work.
  • The other two had taught themselves coding, but ultimately transitioned into management and business development roles.

I think the lesson here is: even if you’re not from a tech background, it’s worth trying out programming in case it grabs you.

Bear in mind, although some people are grabbed immediately, it’s difficult to learn to program for its own sake, and you can still succeed in the tech sector even if that’s not for you. It’s most engaging when you need to use it to achieve something important to you.

All the speakers agreed that it’s highly useful to have at least some programming knowledge if you want to go into the sector (even if you want to work in sales or management). These companies have a strong ‘engineering’ culture, and it’s hard to understand what’s going on without.

Is tech a good place to be if you want to make a difference?

Matt pointed out that tech has allowed people to design products that reach a billion people, while still in their 20s. This is one of the most significant changes in the economy in the last couple of decades. Today, if you want to maximise your impact, software is one of your greatest tools.

In tech you can either make a big difference directly (e.g. Elon Musk) or through earning money to donate (e.g. Bill Gates).

For making a difference directly, the panel was enthusiastic about using tech to improve public service delivery (e.g. education, health), as well as the potential of transformative technologies.

One panel member had worked to prevent abuse through Facebook – an area where even a small improvement can create a huge impact due to the massive scale of the network. When we think about making a difference in technology we tend to think of startups and brand new sectors, but a small improvement for a billion users is a big impact.

Who should start startups?

Matt made a lot of interesting comments, which he later summed up in a medium article.

He also pointed out that it’s possible for non-tech people to found tech startups, provided they have an extremely good understanding of a particular problem they want to solve.

What should your strategy be early career?

The panel emphasised the value of:

  • Learning as much as possible.
  • Working with people you can learn from.
  • Exploring for several years before you start to focus.

If you want to learn to program, doing open source is a great place to start.

Businesses require information technology, or IT, to remain competitive and provide the best products and services to customers. As more and more businesses discover ways to use technology to their benefit, demand for trained, specialized IT professionals grows. For this reason and others, many people interested in starting a new career may consider the IT field. In this article, we discuss reasons to choose an IT career, steps to get started and helpful tips.

Why choose a career in IT?

Choosing a career in IT has a number of benefits, including:

Job stability: For one, IT offers job stability because there is more demand for skilled IT professionals than there are people in the field. Beyond that, IT roles tend to come with compensation that reflects the demand.

Low-cost training opportunities: In many cases, people can become trained in IT without a four-year degree. This means that educational costs to get into the field could be substantially lower than other high-paying fields like medicine or engineering.

Constant evolution: Additionally, IT is always changing with the advent of new technologies, which makes it a good option for people who like to keep learning.

How to start a career in IT

Here’s how to start your IT career in eight steps:

  1. Research roles and positions
  2. Create a short list
  3. Learn to code
  4. Work on an open-source project
  5. Enroll in education
  6. Network with IT professionals
  7. Freelance for experience
  8. Be ready to answer technical questions

1. Research roles and positions

The field of IT is a diverse one with many specialties. Some of these include positions like systems administrator, network engineer, software developer, DevOps specialist and more. Researching the roles and positions available helps you understand which ones might be a good fit for your existing skills, interests and career goals.

2. Create a short list

When you’ve finished your initial research, create a short list of potential jobs. With your ideal jobs in mind, continue to research the qualifications necessary to be hired for the roles you chose. By doing this, you can focus your education and training to better prepare you for your desired positions.

3. Learn to code

HTML is often the first coding language people learn because it’s very common and relatively easy to learn without formal training. Other languages you may want to invest time into learning include JavaScript, Java, C++, Python and Ruby. These are considered more advanced languages and may require more formal training. Classes and tutorials are available online, making it easier for anyone to access educational resources on popular coding methods.

4. Work on an open-source project

You can gain experience with coding by creating or contributing to open-source projects and sharing your knowledge with others. Not only does this build your skill set, but it’s also something you can put in your portfolio and on your resume. To contribute to an open-source project, follow these tips:

Get familiar with open-source platforms. Open-source platforms are tools that developers can use to contribute to or start new projects. Learn the popular open-source platforms and communities that developers use.

Decide if you want to start a new project or contribute. You can create your own projects or contribute to existing ones. Decide which is best for your skill level.

5. Enroll in education

Once you’ve decided on a career path and gotten some experience, enroll in education to solidify your candidacy. This could be taking a formal coding course or enrolling in an associate degree or bachelor’s degree program. What you choose depends on what role you want to achieve. For example, a software developer may just need a few courses or to pass a certification exam, while a systems administrator or network engineer would need to pursue a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science.

6. Network with IT professionals

Before you start on your IT career journey, find opportunities to network with other IT professionals. By attending networking events where you’re likely to meet them, you increase your chances of getting a job referral. These referrals are valuable because they allow you to get special consideration in a competitive field.

You can find IT networking events by checking with your local professional associations, business publications and chambers of commerce. Building relationships through these organizations is a good way to activate your career because you’ll meet people who work locally for IT departments or organizations that may have job openings.

7. Freelance for experience

Once you’ve worked on your applicable IT skills and built your network, you can often gain experience by freelancing. For instance, an aspiring software developer can offer freelance development services, while a web designer can offer freelance website services to the public. Freelancing is a good way to break into the field because it allows you to gain experience while also getting paid for your work.

8. Be ready to answer technical questions

Once you start taking interviews, you’ll need to be prepared to answer technical questions and, in some cases, solve technical problems. Prepare for your interview by researching popular IT interview questions that are highly technical to test your IT capabilities. You can also practice solving problems, including algorithms and fixing code in your preferred coding language.

Some popular IT interview questions include:

  • How long have you been coding in HTML?
  • What coding languages do you know?
  • What is DevOps?
  • Describe a time a development project was unsuccessful. What happened and how did you fix it?
  • What do you like the most about working in IT?

IT career-building tips

Here are some tips to get your IT career moving forward:

Consider getting a certification. Some popular certifications include Microsoft, Oracle, CompTIA, CEH (Certified Ethical Hacker), CISSP (Certified Information Systems Security Professional), CISM (Certified Information Security Manager) and ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library).

Seek a relevant degree. If computer science isn’t your preference, you can further specialize by seeking a degree in one of these related fields: computer information systems, computer engineering, information science, mathematics, statistics, applied science and more.

Update your social media pages. Whenever you’re looking for a new job, it’s important to appear professional and competent to employers, so update all of your social media pages online to reflect your interest in technology.

The barriers to entry in IT are lower than most people think. A commitment to learning, self-growth and finding a job that lets you capitalize on your innate strengths are some of the most important factors involved in switching careers into IT.

Switching careers into IT may seem daunting, but having a plan helps. Don’t want to read the whole article? Focus on these steps:

How do your skills transfer to IT? Take our free career quiz to find out.

Switching Careers into IT: A How-To Guide

Switching to a career in IT is within your reach, even if it may seem daunting. Anyone with the desire to get an IT job can find one that suits their unique skills, talents and interests. There’s a good chance that many of the soft skills you already have apply to a career in IT. One of the best things about IT careers is the sheer number of them. You just have to identify the right one for you and make a plan to acquire the experience and/or training you need to market yourself to hiring managers. Here are some specific steps you can take for successfully switching careers into IT.

Determine What You Want out of an Information Technology Career

What are you passionate about? How much money do you want to be earning? What makes you happy in a professional sense? Helping people? Solving problems? Being able to show off your creative side? These are questions you should ask yourself as you begin to research possible career options. You need to take a personal inventory of everything you desire out of a job and really ask yourself, “what career is best for me?”.

Pick a Job Role That Aligns with What You Want

This involves research. Read IT job descriptions and talk to IT professionals to figure out which technology job best meets your needs. Do your due diligence in terms of research. This could entail watching day-in-the-life videos on YouTube and on the CompTIA website, or attending informational webinars about IT careers and technology trends.

Talk to People Who Have the Job You Want

Scan your LinkedIn network and talk to friends and family about your desired career change. Find someone who has the job you want and reach out to them to see if they’ll meet up for an informational interview. This will help you figure out how they got the job you desire and help you start thinking about how you can replicate the steps they took to successfully secure the position.

Consider Getting a Mentor

You can seek out a mentor in your desired career role by joining a professional organization. A mentor can help coach you through doing what you need to do to properly make the switch to your dream career. A mentor can also help you network with the right people and set the right goals for yourself as you acquire skills and look for jobs.

Research the Training You’ll Need and Compare Training Options

You may be able to self-study in your spare time at home and pick up necessary skills using resources like Lynda.com and MOOCs. You may also benefit from enrolling in classes or tech boot camps or reading books that teach IT skills. You can even try out CompTIA CertMaster for IT Fundamentals to start picking up key IT skills today.

Consider Getting Certified

Research and identify any applicable certification options. Check out our 4 Steps to Certification and our Get into IT digital brochure to start figuring out what kinds of certifications are out there and how those certifications can help make you a more marketable job candidate. The right certifications on your resume can make a world of difference if you’re changing your career drastically.

Tinker

Try out new things on your personal computer. Depending on your desired career path, you may want to do things like build your own website, experiment with open-source software or build a database. A good portion of what you need to know for IT jobs can be learned through trial and error using the technology you already have at home.

Explore Other Educational Options

Although many careers in information technology don’t require you to go back to college, a few of them might. If this is the case with your desired career, you may want to find the right option for yourself at a university. More and more reputable schools offer online classes, and these can be a more flexible option, particularly if you’re not ready to quit your current job.

Get Hands-On Experience

Hands-on experience does not have to come from a full-time, paid position. You also can get it from volunteer positions, apprenticeships, part-time jobs and internships. Reach out to companies that could use your assistance while allowing you to learn on the job. Most IT jobs don’t offer paid training at the beginning of your employment, but some do. Look into your desired field and see if employer-sponsored training is a possibility.

Identify Additional Skills Gaps

Assess which skills you’ve acquired and compare them to the skills listed in job postings. If you’re still lacking in any areas, find additional educational resources to help you fill gaps. Take our free career quiz to see what IT careers are a good match for the skills you already have.

Tailor Your Resume to IT

Use the same language you see in job descriptions and focus on the skills/experience you have that relates to the jobs you want. Read up on how to select the right kind of resume and get the attention of more hiring managers, and when you get down to writing, make sure you highlight all of your transferable skills.

Network

In addition to setting up informational interviews and finding an IT mentor, you should cast your net wider and introduce yourself to as many IT professionals as you can. Attend professional association events, networking gatherings and conferences.

LinkedIn can also be a great tool for digital networking. Make sure your LinkedIn profile is up to date and that you connect online with the people you meet at networking events.

Knowing the right people in the industry who can introduce you to hiring managers when positions open up can benefit your job search considerably. In fact, according to LinkedIn, a 2016 survey revealed that 85 percent of jobseekers find their jobs through networking. Never doubt the power of expanding your network!

Be Persistent

Set specific, actionable goals and do your best to achieve them on a set timeline. Even if you encounter hurdles as you’re venturing into the realm of information technology jobs, keep going and don’t give up. With the right amount of effort and persistence, switching careers into IT is possible, and so is conquering all of the career goals you set for yourself.

Be Patient

Remember that changing careers takes time, patience and practice. You also don’t want to overwhelm yourself by trying to take on too many new things at once. You can learn new skills in small doses over time, and be patient with yourself as you learn. Remember that everyone learns at their own pace, and no one has ever become an IT pro overnight.

Still trying to decide which careers in technology could be right for you? Take our quiz to see which IT career is right for you.

For upon |Information Technology (IT) has wider sense and it involves modern way of working mechanism with machines and with humans. Computers and people both works together for the sake to achieve some objectives. Starting career in information technology field is has much more chances to get attractions and involved human activities depending upon the nature of the projects. Demand of IT workforce has been increased and with the passage of time, people are taking interests in IT field Medical WordPress Themes to introduce / explore their ideas to gain meaningful objectives. Prepare your mind and choose careful career in IT field and start making your personal practices through proper channels.

Career Planning and Interest in IT

Starting career in information technology is bright and result oriented. Take careful decisions and choose the best skills in IT field to get desired goals. The first and the foremost option is your interest in IT field. Decide what you actually want from IT field, if you are efficient and have ambition to start your career in IT field then just homework, games, chatting with friends and casually browsing the web then you may get chance in IT related job. Try to make your goals and objectives in a specific field and improve your specialties by doing alone works to accomplish tasks. Focus the fields and do some practical’s to achieve results. In IT career, a person can do website development, application development, front-end website work, search engine optimization (SEO), and much more IT related tasks as profession and passion. Decide if you feels you are best for IT and suited for it. Explore your qualities and skills with others to present a unique style to get attention of your audience.

If you’re reading this, chances are you’ve just come to the conclusion that you’re interested in beginning a career in Information Technology, but have no idea where to start.

The process of beginning your IT journey isn’t all that complicated, but it will require some serious decision making and consideration of your own personal goals, expectations, intentions, and flexibilities. Here are 7 steps to start a career in Information Technology.

Step 1: Determine your passions within IT

First, you’ll want to determine your passions, interests, and goals. Lay out your career path accordingly.

Having an IT related career isn’t for everyone. That is why it’s vital to understand your passions, interests, and goals, so you can discover whether or not Information Technology is the field you’d like to get involved in. Do your research and find out which areas of expertise are in need of IT specialists, and determine whether or not this matches up with your incentives.

Step 2: Narrow down your area of interest.

There are a number of possible careers in Information Technology. Just to name a few, here’s what you might come across:

● Information Technology Manager
● Software Engineer
● Database Administrator
● Computer Technical Support Specialist
● Computer Network Architect
● Network Administrator
● Hardware Engineer
● PC Repair Technician
● Network Support Specialist
● Systems Administrator

There are many paths you can choose in Information Technology, but by being able to narrow down your area of interest, you can ensure that you’ll receive the proper education to meet your career goals.

Step 3: Transitioning from Self-Taught IT skills to a Career

Next, take some time to consider your self-taught skills, and proceed accordingly.

When selecting an IT path, it can be useful to consider your self-taught skills prior to making any decisions. If you have Information Technology related abilities, and if you find the work to be interesting or even exciting, it may be wise to proceed accordingly. Particularly if you are passionate about a specific aspect of Information Technology, try to find an education path that could expand upon your already existent skills, making the entire career building process that much easier in the long run.

Step 4: Decide your availability and desired work hours.

When entering a new career, every individual has a different set up in mind. For some, working 9-5 five days a week is ideal, while others prefer to have more flexible hours. The good news about a career in IT is, no two jobs are the same. With that being said, some companies allow for flexible work accommodations or even remote work, while others expect stricter deadlines and schedules for their employees. Additionally, both full time and part-time work opportunities exist in IT, which further allows you to tailor this career field to your needs. Truly consider the type of availability and workload that would suit you best, and keep this in mind when you actually start your job hunt.

Step 5: Getting the right education for an IT career

Now, you’re ready to get your education and learn the skills necessary to work in your chosen field.

Most employers in the IT world are looking for employees that have some form of higher education. Although it’s true that some companies hire people who have the right skillset even if they don’t have the formal education to back it up, it may be best to enroll in a program that can teach what you’ll need to know at your first day on the job. Typically, IT companies are looking for related certifications, and ICOHS can help.

Offering three programs related to Information Technology, as well as a Continuing Education specialization for working IT professionals who want to expand upon their skills, this fully accredited vocational school can assist in getting you prepared for a blossoming career in the technology industry. ICOHS currently offers these education paths:

If you’re located in or around the San Diego, California area and are desiring a reputable, tailored-to-you education in Information Technology, be sure to contact ICOHS and request more information about their IT programs.

Step 6: Build your resume and exemplify your skills.

In order to prepare for an IT career, you’ll want to have a strong resume that accurately exemplifies your skills, along with your intentions going into a technology-related career. Get ready to present all of your certifications, self-taught skills, internships, work experiences, additional skills, and more. Be sure to research any of your future interview opportunities too. If a company presents you with an interview opening, study the business and understand the basic ins and outs of its mission. You’ll want to be fully prepared proceeding into any interview so that you can score your dream job and make your career goals become a reality.

Step 7: Go on the job hunt.

After you’ve received your IT certifications/education and perfected your resume, it’s time to start the job hunt. These are the types of careers and pay you can expect to receive after completing one of our programs:

How to start a career in information technology

Not only does getting your education at ICOHS College improve your access to networking with industry professionals, but ICOHS also works with their students, offering them lifetime job placement and looking after them long after the actual education has been completed. This attribute attests to the vocational school’s deep care and consideration for their students and it also serves as a viable reason to choose a fully accredited, highly qualified learning path with ICOHS.

Do what you love in life and be supported by a school that wants you to succeed. Find out more about our IT certifications and programs click >>HERE

By Benjamin Todd · Published February 6th, 2015

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By Benjamin Todd · Published February 6th, 2015

  • Like
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email
  • Print

80,000 Hours: Oxford recently hosted a panel on careers in technology, co-hosted with Codelaborate, featuring four people who did arts degrees but ended up working in tech and loving their jobs.

We think tech is one of the most promising sectors, so are interested in how to start a career in technology, even if you come from an arts background. Here’s some rough notes I made on the panel (note that they may not accurately reflect the views of the panel and haven’t been checked by them).

The panel included:

  • Matt Clifford – studied Ancient History at Cambridge before doing a degree at MIT, worked in strategy consulting but quit to start Entrepreneur First
  • Jackson Gabbard – studied English at a small college in the US but was one of the first engineers at Facebook London
  • Nabeel Qureshi – studied PPE at Oxford, worked in consultancy but now works at startup GoCardless
  • Steven Shingler – studied double bass at the Royal College of Music in London, but now works at Google as an engineer.

How did they end up in tech, and what clues might there be for other arts graduates who want to go into the sector?

  • All had, at some point, taught themselves computer programming.
  • The two software engineers stumbled across it by accident (one wanted to design a website for a friend’s band and another wanted to set up a printer network to print promotional materials), but quickly found themselves obsessed, working long into the evening trying to get things to work.
  • The other two had taught themselves coding, but ultimately transitioned into management and business development roles.

I think the lesson here is: even if you’re not from a tech background, it’s worth trying out programming in case it grabs you.

Bear in mind, although some people are grabbed immediately, it’s difficult to learn to program for its own sake, and you can still succeed in the tech sector even if that’s not for you. It’s most engaging when you need to use it to achieve something important to you.

All the speakers agreed that it’s highly useful to have at least some programming knowledge if you want to go into the sector (even if you want to work in sales or management). These companies have a strong ‘engineering’ culture, and it’s hard to understand what’s going on without.

Is tech a good place to be if you want to make a difference?

Matt pointed out that tech has allowed people to design products that reach a billion people, while still in their 20s. This is one of the most significant changes in the economy in the last couple of decades. Today, if you want to maximise your impact, software is one of your greatest tools.

In tech you can either make a big difference directly (e.g. Elon Musk) or through earning money to donate (e.g. Bill Gates).

For making a difference directly, the panel was enthusiastic about using tech to improve public service delivery (e.g. education, health), as well as the potential of transformative technologies.

One panel member had worked to prevent abuse through Facebook – an area where even a small improvement can create a huge impact due to the massive scale of the network. When we think about making a difference in technology we tend to think of startups and brand new sectors, but a small improvement for a billion users is a big impact.

Who should start startups?

Matt made a lot of interesting comments, which he later summed up in a medium article.

He also pointed out that it’s possible for non-tech people to found tech startups, provided they have an extremely good understanding of a particular problem they want to solve.

What should your strategy be early career?

The panel emphasised the value of:

  • Learning as much as possible.
  • Working with people you can learn from.
  • Exploring for several years before you start to focus.

If you want to learn to program, doing open source is a great place to start.

Find out how to become an information technology specialist. Research the education and training requirements, and learn about the experience you need to advance your career as an information technology specialist.

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Should I Become an Information Technology Specialist?

An information technology (IT) specialist is a computer support and security administrator who assists companies and organizations with managing hardware, software, networking and solving problems. These professionals go by a range of titles, including information security analyst and network administrator. They can find work in a wide variety of industries, like business, government and manufacturing. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), network and computer systems administrators earned a median salary of $87,070 in May 2018.

Career Requirements

Degree Level Bachelor’s degree; master’s preferred
Degree Field(s) Computer science, information science, or a related field
License/Certification Voluntary certifications available
Experience 3+ years
Key Skills Analytical, organizational, leadership, communication and decision-making skills; familiarity with project management, customer management, web platform development software, and server operating systems; capable of using computer equipment such as servers and network analyzers
Median Annual Salary (2018) $87,070 (for network and computer systems administrators)

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

A bachelor’s degree is commonly required, but some employers prefer a master’s degree in computer science, information science or a related field. Employers also want to see at least 3 years of IT experience, with 5 to 10 years of experience for upper-level positions. The skills needed as an IT specialist include analytical, organizational, leadership, communication and decision-making skills. You need familiarity with project management software, customer management software, server operating systems, and web platform development software. You should also be capable of using computer equipment, such as servers and network analyzers. While certification is voluntary, it is common within the field.

Steps to Becoming an IT Specialist

The following are steps you can take to become an IT specialist:

Step 1: Earn a Bachelor’s Degree

The BLS maintains that a bachelor’s degree in a computer-related field is the most common requirement for becoming an IT specialist. Relevant majors include computer science, information systems and software engineering. Students in bachelor degree programs generally start by gaining a solid foundation in mathematics, science and engineering. They build a broad knowledge of computer science subjects in courses in data structures, numerical analysis, data management and programming languages.

Take advantage of computer laboratory resources. Institutions that offer computer science programs may also offer sophisticated computer labs for students. You should take advantage of these resources and the opportunity to get hands-on experience with the programs and software that are taught in classes and used in day-to-day operations of an IT specialist.

Also consider completing an internship. Since experience is an important part of finding employment in this profession, entry-level IT specialists may have trouble finding work. You can gain some practical experience and make professional contacts in the field by completing an internship with a local IT firm or the IT department of a company.

Step 2: Gain Professional Experience

According to a survey of job postings from monster.com in September 2012, IT specialist jobs typically require at least 3 years of experience in the field. The BLS indicates that advanced IT management and security analysis positions may require 5 or more years of experience. Typically, less experience is necessary at smaller organizations, so aspiring IT specialists may find this to be the best place to start their careers.

Consider also obtaining certification. Though certification is not required to enter this profession, it may help demonstrate skill and experience to employers. Additionally, employers often require IT specialists to have expertise with specific products. Vendors like Cisco, Oracle and Microsoft offer certification in their software products. Third-party organizations, like CompTIA, also administer certification for multiple vendors. Certification prerequisites and requirements vary by organization, though certification is usually awarded upon successful passage of an exam.

Step 3: Consider Earning a Master’s Degree

A bachelor’s degree may be the most common level of education required to become an IT specialist, but some employers prefer to hire applicants who have earned master’s degrees in computer science or related areas. Also, master’s degrees may create more opportunities for individuals seeking career advancement or higher positions in the field. Students in master’s degree programs build on the knowledge that they have accrued during their undergraduate education and explore computer science theory and practice more extensively. They may take courses in computer graphics, algorithms, artificial intelligence, computational modeling and computer vision. Independent study and research in computer science, as well as a thesis, may also be required.

Expert Contributor: Allesha Fogle Allesha has graduate degrees in software engineering and computer science. She has over 15 years’ experience in software and application development.

Even if you’re just starting in IT, our in-depth programs will turn you into a skilled specialist!

You know IT careers are in-demand and rewarding, but what if that’s really all you know?

Is a career in IT possible even if you are a tech beginner?

Absolutely! Many of our students come to us with little prior knowledge or experience in technology, and that’s perfectly okay. Age, previous work experience, and computer know-how up to this point are not qualifiers to starting your IT career.

MyComputerCareer is your first step to your new career path. With our in-depth programs that offer both detailed instruction and hands-on application, you’ll earn the certifications that prove to employers you are a skilled professional who is ready to succeed!

What Is IT?

IT, or Information Technology, is the umbrella term to describe everything related to developing, installing, maintaining, and managing anything related to computing and telecommunications.

While the scope of IT is broad, it would be impossible to specialize in every aspect of hardware, software, network, and security from the construction to the management. Instead, your career in IT will have a focused specialization.

At MyComputerCareer, we offer a comprehensive education that gives you an overview of information technology to give you a solid foundation. Then, we build on that knowledge with more focused training to help you determine your career path.

Ready to start learning the foundations of information technology?

How to Succeed at a Career in IT.

At MyComputerCareer, we do everything we can to help our students succeed in their career in IT. We offer programs that lead to sought-after certifications that the biggest names in technology recognize, and with our Career Services team, we provide lifelong resources and services to help you land that dream job!

But those are only pieces of the puzzle!

Do you have what it takes to thrive in your career and achieve your goals?