How to start a snow plowing business

How to start a snow plowing business

In the right areas of the U.S., someone with a plow hitch on the front of their pickup truck or tractor is a busy person these days and if they’ve done their planning right, sitting on a lot of extra cash right now.

A snow plowing business in the right location can give seasonal outdoor contractors a way of expanding their brand and keeping busy during the winter.

And it’s a scalable business, too. It can be just a means of adding a few extra bucks to the coffers or something much bigger than that. Entrepreneurs with a pickup and snow plow on the front can pick up residential clients and stay busy the day of or after a storm. Other contractors could chase bigger plow contracts, like at a shopping center.

Guide to Starting a Snow Plowing Business

Here’s a plan outline for starting a snow plowing business.

Determine the Viability

If you’re not in an area where a lot of snow falls annually, it may be best to leave this notion on the table. Plows and equipment are not cheap, so you’d need to live in an area with enough snow to pay for the equipment.

Decide Whether to Go Big or Go Home(s)

No matter how ambitious you are, if you’ve only got one or two capable plow trucks, you should stick to securing work in residential neighborhoods. Plow-ready trucks, some shovels and a healthy budget for rock salt and ice melt are all you need to get started.

Contractor companies with multiple trucks are likely to be more ready to handle jobs like clearing the parking lots of shopping centers and office complexes. These jobs are typically awarded by contract ahead of the snowy season.

Get The Right License

Finding out about the licensing and regulations you’ll need to follow is critical. Normally these businesses are licensed. You can check with your city or town or even follow this link to the SBA’s local assistance page.

Compile an Equipment Checklist

Before you start looking for plow work, take stock of your current equipment and supplies. Determine what you’ll need to complete just one residential driveway or one storefront or small store parking lot.

Then take a look at the truck. If it’s not equipped for plowing, you’ll need to make an investment. Find out what the cost of backup equipment will be.

Then do a status check on all equipment and supplies after every job to ensure you’re ready for the next snowfall.

Find an Emergency Backup

This is one area where you don’t want to anger your customer. Nothing is worse than dealing with irate snowbound customers suffering from cabin fever.

If for any reason you’re unable to commit to a customer you acquire — due to equipment malfunction, injury or illness — you need to be able to deliver your services. Fail to show up to plow out one person’s house and you’ll never work there again.

Advertise Locally — For Free

Before you develop any sort of advertising budget, take advantage of all the free local ads and online services. Consider the rise in popularity of “near me” searches. Set up a Google My Business account for your snow plow business. Do the same on sites like Yext, too. Don’t forget about Facebook and Craigslist, especially for local businesses.

Offer your first few customers a break if they help spread the word about your new venture. This is one service where someone asks someone they know who does it for them.

Business cards can be tacked up on community bulletin boards, too.

Price It Right

Not only do you need to find a good target market, you need to charge the right price.

Consider that list of materials, equipment and supplies and what they cost. Shop around for bulk pricing and where you can get the best deals on everything.

Establish Clear Service Offers

Your business can range from shoveling a sidewalk to plowing an entire parking lot. Be clear in your pricing structure what customers can expect and when they can expect them.

Find Good Insurance

Like most other businesses, whether you’re big or small, it’s a good idea to have some kind of insurance to cover liability. Reducing the premiums you’ll pay can often mean getting extra safety features like rear mounted cameras and extra backup lights.

Experts agree you can’t get away from having liability coverage to cover you for things like accidental falls in a parking lot.

Arrange for Payments and Offer Choices

The most important part of your snow plow business will be getting paid for your work. Have a process in place for accepting cash payments. You’ll likely get a lot of those.

Look into accepting credit cards and mobile payments, too. It offers a convenience to your customers and helps you keep track of payments without worry of misplacing cash payments you get while you’re busy plowing.

Develop an Off-Season Plan

Once snow is out of the forecast doesn’t mean your plowing business should end. Use the down time to maintain and fix any broken equipment. Have a plan for keeping good equipment in that same condition until the next winter rolls around.

Look for deals on winter supplies after the season is over. And most importantly, start securing work for the first snow of the next winter season.

How to start a snow plowing business

In the right areas of the U.S., someone with a plow hitch on the front of their pickup truck or tractor is a busy person these days and if they’ve done their planning right, sitting on a lot of extra cash right now.

A snow plowing business in the right location can give seasonal outdoor contractors a way of expanding their brand and keeping busy during the winter.

And it’s a scalable business, too. It can be just a means of adding a few extra bucks to the coffers or something much bigger than that. Entrepreneurs with a pickup and snow plow on the front can pick up residential clients and stay busy the day of or after a storm. Other contractors could chase bigger plow contracts, like at a shopping center.

Guide to Starting a Snow Plowing Business

Here’s a plan outline for starting a snow plowing business.

Determine the Viability

If you’re not in an area where a lot of snow falls annually, it may be best to leave this notion on the table. Plows and equipment are not cheap, so you’d need to live in an area with enough snow to pay for the equipment.

Decide Whether to Go Big or Go Home(s)

No matter how ambitious you are, if you’ve only got one or two capable plow trucks, you should stick to securing work in residential neighborhoods. Plow-ready trucks, some shovels and a healthy budget for rock salt and ice melt are all you need to get started.

Contractor companies with multiple trucks are likely to be more ready to handle jobs like clearing the parking lots of shopping centers and office complexes. These jobs are typically awarded by contract ahead of the snowy season.

Get The Right License

Finding out about the licensing and regulations you’ll need to follow is critical. Normally these businesses are licensed. You can check with your city or town or even follow this link to the SBA’s local assistance page.

Compile an Equipment Checklist

Before you start looking for plow work, take stock of your current equipment and supplies. Determine what you’ll need to complete just one residential driveway or one storefront or small store parking lot.

Then take a look at the truck. If it’s not equipped for plowing, you’ll need to make an investment. Find out what the cost of backup equipment will be.

Then do a status check on all equipment and supplies after every job to ensure you’re ready for the next snowfall.

Find an Emergency Backup

This is one area where you don’t want to anger your customer. Nothing is worse than dealing with irate snowbound customers suffering from cabin fever.

If for any reason you’re unable to commit to a customer you acquire — due to equipment malfunction, injury or illness — you need to be able to deliver your services. Fail to show up to plow out one person’s house and you’ll never work there again.

Advertise Locally — For Free

Before you develop any sort of advertising budget, take advantage of all the free local ads and online services. Consider the rise in popularity of “near me” searches. Set up a Google My Business account for your snow plow business. Do the same on sites like Yext, too. Don’t forget about Facebook and Craigslist, especially for local businesses.

Offer your first few customers a break if they help spread the word about your new venture. This is one service where someone asks someone they know who does it for them.

Business cards can be tacked up on community bulletin boards, too.

Price It Right

Not only do you need to find a good target market, you need to charge the right price.

Consider that list of materials, equipment and supplies and what they cost. Shop around for bulk pricing and where you can get the best deals on everything.

Establish Clear Service Offers

Your business can range from shoveling a sidewalk to plowing an entire parking lot. Be clear in your pricing structure what customers can expect and when they can expect them.

Find Good Insurance

Like most other businesses, whether you’re big or small, it’s a good idea to have some kind of insurance to cover liability. Reducing the premiums you’ll pay can often mean getting extra safety features like rear mounted cameras and extra backup lights.

Experts agree you can’t get away from having liability coverage to cover you for things like accidental falls in a parking lot.

Arrange for Payments and Offer Choices

The most important part of your snow plow business will be getting paid for your work. Have a process in place for accepting cash payments. You’ll likely get a lot of those.

Look into accepting credit cards and mobile payments, too. It offers a convenience to your customers and helps you keep track of payments without worry of misplacing cash payments you get while you’re busy plowing.

Develop an Off-Season Plan

Once snow is out of the forecast doesn’t mean your plowing business should end. Use the down time to maintain and fix any broken equipment. Have a plan for keeping good equipment in that same condition until the next winter rolls around.

Look for deals on winter supplies after the season is over. And most importantly, start securing work for the first snow of the next winter season.

Snow removal (including snow plowing, shoveling, and ice removal) is a seasonal business in many parts of the world. It can provide a part time or even full time income. Many contractors who work outdoors, such as roofers, masons, and lawn care professionals, have a second business involving snow plowing and removal in the colder months.

You need more than a shovel to start and run a profitable snow business. Having a successful snow removal business involves organization, knowledge, patience, perseverance, people-skills, and a number of other traits. Many business owners fail, not because they weren’t skilled in working a snow plow, but because they were not skilled in running a business.

The larger you want your snow removal company to be, the better you need to be as a business owner, as the responsibility will be greater. It is not wrong to dream big, but if you are a new business owner, it is best to start small and work your way up.

There are three basic steps to starting a snow removal company from scratch. First is planning. Second is registering with proper government institutions. Lastly, you will need to promote your business in some way to attract customers.

1. Plan Your Snow Removal Company

Develop a Business plan

Before diving in to any business, you should develop a business plan. If you want to start a snow removal business, you definitely need to start with a business plan! Snow plows, salt spreaders, and other equipment, along with vehicles can cost a lot of money. Don’t forget about insurance costs, not only for you, but for any employees. A business plan doesn’t have to be anything complicated, but is something that will help organize your goals and priorities and help you make wise decisions.

Planning properly will help you decide if you are going to specialize in a specific area such as commercial snow removal, or if you will offer a variety of services including salt spreading.

  • Set short and long-term goals – Plan your business before you spend a dime.
  • Decide what services you will offer – Decide the scope of your business.
  • Find a niche – What will be your specialty? What will set you apart from the competition?
  • Choose a business name – Put some thought into deciding a name for your snow removal business. If you already have a name for an existing business, you can simply add information about your snow removal services to your marketing materials.
  • Decide what you will charge for your services
  • Financing – You may need to get a business loan

Get Organized

As soon as you start your snow removal business, you will need some sort of organizational structure so you can keep your customer communications and business-related paperwork in order. You won’t necessarily need a full office when starting out. An office desk dedicated to your business paperwork would be helpful.

How to start a snow plowing business

Get a daily planner or use your smartphone to schedule estimates, jobs, and other work-related appointments. An easy way to lose customers is to arrive late or even forget a scheduled appointment. Snow removal is often a 24-hour, on-call job. You will need to be prepared to work at an unpredictable schedule.

  • Set up an office
  • E-mail
  • Business phone
  • Estimate forms
  • Bill Forms

Equipment needed when starting a snow removal company

Equipment will probably account for the largest portion of your startup costs. Starting out, you don’t necessarily need all brand-new tools and equipment. You will save thousands of dollars in startup costs by purchasing a used truck, used plow, used salt spreader, and any other misc. equipment you may need. If you already have a truck for your existing business, you already have one necessary piece of equipment.How to start a snow plowing business

2. Register Your New Snow Removal Business

Make it legal

Make sure you are following proper protocol in your region. This means having necessary insurance, following tax codes, getting proper licenses and permits, etc. This applies even to a part-time business.

Some steps to starting your snow removal company legally:

  • Select your business structure (sole-proprietor, LLC, Corporation, etc.)
  • Register your business name
  • Register your business entity
  • Register as a home improvement contractor with your state (US)
  • Open a business bank account
  • Taxes- either get an accountant, or do research on filing yourself
  • Liability Insurance
  • Worker’s Compensation
  • City Licenses and Permits

3. Grow Your New Snow Removal Business

In order to grow your snow removal company, you will need to work hard, have people skills, and be patient. You will also need to market your business effectively. Success and profit won’t come overnight. There is often a lot of competition to secure contracts. You may need to start out with residential customers if you are having trouble signing up commercial contracts.

Customers

Beside employees, dealing with customers can cause a great amount of stress. Learning how to communicate well with customers can help boost sales and increase word-of-mouth leads.

  • Learn how to sell a snow removal job/contract to a potential customer
  • Estimate a job properly
  • Communicate regularly and clearly with the customer
  • Be fair and honest- take responsibility for your mistakes

Marketing

After you start a snow removal business, you need to market it. Some low-cost advertising to get started can include a basic 1 or 2 page website, setting up a free business listing for your snow removal company on Google and other online directories, social media accounts, business cards and a few yard signs.

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How to Start a Snow Removal Business in Canada

How to Start A Snow Removal Business in the UK

How to start a snow plowing business

Snow plowing is one of the most rewarding businesses especially if you live in a region where there is plenty of snowfall during the winter season. If you are not afraid of hard work and are patient then you should consider taking advantage of this excellent money making opportunity. The best part about this business is the fact you do not need a huge investment to get going. Just purchase a truck and a plow to start making decent returns from this venture. While you may not become a millionaire overnight, you can certainly improve your income considerably by following some simple tips to help you start a snow plowing business.

Things Required:

– Snow Plow
– Marketing Plan
– Advertising Plan

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Instructions

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The first and obvious step is to purchase a decent snow plow so that you can perform the job in an efficient manner. Having the right equipment is crucial for running a successful snow plowing business. You can look into purchasing either new or used snow plowing equipment. Depending on your budget, you can even modify an ordinary truck to effectively plow snow from various roads throughout your area. The most important factor when deciding on which snow plowing equipment to purchase is to check how much snow it can effectively move. You want to be able to clear the road in one trip and not have to keep going back and forth. Also, it is important to remember that harsh winter conditions can wreak havoc on your equipment so make sure you buy the best quality possible and always get the maintenance done regularly.

Find out what are the market rates for snow plowing jobs in your business. You must know the prices offered by your competitors to have any chance of starting your business successfully. New businesses should always charge less than their rivals to attract customers. If possible, work out the average figure and use that value to monitor your prices.

As we all know it is almost impossible to start a new business successfully without developing an effective and working marketing strategy. Take your time to develop an advertisement plan that will give your competitor a run for their money. Every penny you spend in marketing is likely to bring huge returns and therefore you must not be afraid of initial marketing capital. Depending on the size of your business, you can either hire an individual or a team to perform marketing tasks for you.

Wendy Komancheck

Published on November 13, 2018

How to start a snow plowing business

When you’re starting out in any business, you’re going to make mistakes.

Especially in a business as unpredictable as snow removal.

However, you need to avoid these 10 errors because they’ll cost you a lot of money.

. and could kill your snow removal business.

10. Failing to Document Everything

Running a snow and ice management company is risky business—especially when it comes to slip and fall lawsuits.

If you want to keep your liability down, you need to document every time you drive onto your customer’s property.

  • Time
  • Who cleared lots and walkways
  • Date and weather conditions

How to start a snow plowing business

9. Failing to Document Pre-Season and Follow-Up Visits

When you or your snow crews come back to reapply salt or plow the snow, you need to make a note of the time, date and what you did as well as who was with you.

The same goes for pre-season visits (which are incredibly important).

By the way, if you promised in your contract that you’ll do follow-up visits, you better make sure that you do them. or you could be held liable for a slip and fall claim.

8. Not Following Through With the Signed Snow Contract

What did you say you would do?

What is in writing?

If you promised that parking lots will be cleared by 6 a.m. when the first shift arrives for work, then those lots must be clean.

Don’t overschedule your crews to clear more lots than they can reasonably finish.

Otherwise, you’re taking a chance of being held liable for injuries or just an angry property manager whose parking lot wasn’t cleared by the time workers needed to start their shift.

The Accredited Snow Contractors Association (ASCA) has templates to help you develop a contract that reduces your liability risks and still have a successful snow business.

7. Failing to Teach and Instill the Importance of Documenting to Your Snow Crews

If you’re the business owner, you need to make sure your crew leaders and/or your teams know how to record when they arrived, what they did, and how long it took at each site that is contracted with you.

This should be part of your training process, and documented in your business.

Starting to see a pattern yet? Documentation may be the most important survival tool your snow business has.

6. Missing Important Language in Your Contract Leads to Future Problems With Clients

Make sure you have the appropriate signatures between all parties (you and the property manager, for instance).

Here are other important points that need to be included in your contract:

  • The dates that the contract is valid.
    • For example, your contract is valid from November 15, 2018 to April 15, 2019.
  • Don’t use language that puts unrealistic expectations on you or your crews.
    • For instance, you can’t guarantee that there will be bare pavements if the snowstorm is still going strong at 8 a.m.
  • Make sure you include “Acts of God” or “Force Majeure” events in your contracts.
    • There are issues that you can’t control because Mother Nature has a mind of her own.
    • Limit how much responsibility you take on.
  • And if you’re signing a contract that the customer drew up, make sure you read the language before you sign on the dotted line.
    • If you don’t understand something in the contract, make sure you ask for clarification.
    • It’s better to know upfront of what you’re liable for and still have a chance of not signing a contract compared to signing a contract and being held responsible for something that wasn’t your fault.

How to start a snow plowing business

5. Not Training Your Team on Using the Snow Equipment or Taking Them to Site Visits

If you want to avoid any liability issues as well as broken snow equipment, make sure you train your crews on how to use different plows, skid loaders and other equipment.

Also, if you have commercial snow accounts, make sure you take a crew leader or one of your team to each site, so they know where to put the snow, who the property manager is, and how the parking lot is laid out.

4. Newbie Alert: Not Having the Right Equipment to Efficiently Clean the Parking Lots

Make sure you have the right size equipment for your contracted jobs.

Using smaller trucks that aren’t designed to handle a heavy plow or pushing heavy snow will only make your job harder.

Plus, your trucks and plows won’t last as long if they need to work harder than they’re meant to.

3. Buying Used Equipment

When you’re starting out, you don’t have a lot of money to spend on snow equipment.

However, be careful when you buy used plows and blowers.

Generally speaking, buying a used plow is a bad idea because the moldboard could have problems you don’t notice until you’re using it at 3 a.m.

As you know, snow removal companies use their equipment hard, so many times it’s not in good condition. If you do buy used, make sure it’s from a trustworthy dealership.

How to start a snow plowing business

Setting up a snow plowing business is a great opportunity for outdoor contractors to expand their business this winter season. And, it’s easier than you might think; anyone with a plow hitch on a pickup truck can easily stay busy this winter season by picking up snow plowing jobs. With the right strategy in place, you’re sure to see some extra cash rolling in.

Snow plowing is a booming business

Snow plowing is a very scalable business. In fact, research from IBIS World found that the snow plowing industry raked in about $19 billion in revenue last year. And, the industry continues to grow by 0.7% every year. Small business owners who work in landscaping, likely already have most of the equipment necessary to start snow plowing, such as a pickup truck. This makes it easy to acquire residential clients. From there, you can start working your way up to bigger, commercial clients, like shopping malls.

So what’s the best way to start a snow plowing business? We put together these 10, easy-to-follow tips that will help you get started.

1. Determine Your Expenses

Snow plowing equipment can be very expensive, so it’s very important to make sure you’ll be able to pick up enough clients to cover these startup costs. From the very start, it’s vital that you manage your small business expenses. You can also consider options like a business credit card or a loan to help you get started.

2. Choose Your Target Market

Once you have some basic equipment it’ll be easy to start picking up residential clients. To get started, all you need are plow-ready trucks, some shovels and a healthy budget for rock salt and ice melt. Snow contractor companies with more industrial equipment can handle bigger jobs like clearing the parking lots of shopping centers and office complexes. They’re usually awarded these jobs before the start of the snowy season. So, if you’ve already missed out on nabbing these clients focus on building up your portfolio with smaller clients. That way you’ll have more experience to show larger prospective clients next year.

3. Make Sure You’re Licensed

Do your research about the license requirements for snow plow operators in your area. Some states may have state-level requirements, while other areas may have different qualifications at the municipal level. Obtaining the right licenses is vital before starting any project, you don’t want to face heavy fines or penalties later on.

4. Compile an Equipment Checklist

Before starting any jobs make sure that you take stock of your current equipment and supplies. Find out what you will need to carry out a job in one residential driveway or one storefront or a small store parking lot. Have a look at your truck; is it in proper working condition? If not, consider taking it to a mechanic for maintenance. Also, put together a backup plan, and determine how much money should be set aside for repairs. After each job it’s also a good idea to do a status check on all your equipment and supplies in order to prepare for the next job.

5. Have a Plan B

It’s always important to have a plan B. Nothing can sink your businesses faster than negative customer reviews, so make sure you’re always able to follow-through on your delivery. Remember, your customers are relying on your services during severe weather, you don’t want to leave them stranded. Have a backup crew on standby in cases any employees get sick and prepare all your equipment ahead of time to avoid breakdowns.

6. Advertise Locally, and For Free

There’s no need to invest a major budget for advertising. Instead, take advantage of local advertising opportunities, after all this is where the bulk of your clientele will come from. Use SEO techniques to optimize your site for “near me” searches online. Set up a Google My Business account, and create similar accounts on websites like Yext, Facebook and Craigslist.

Word of mouth referrals are another great, and free, marketing opportunity for your snow plowing business. Send out customer feedback surveys and encourage happy clients to write positive reviews online and social media.

7. Charge the Right Price

Inasmuch as you need to find a good target market, you also need to charge the right price. Determine the cost of all the materials, equipment and supplies needed for your business. Find out where you can get the best deals buying them in bulk. Charging competitively will help you stand out from the competition. In addition, have a clear pricing structure so that customers know what to expect from your services.

8. Offer Payment Choices

Of course, as a small business owner, you want to get paid for the work you do. Most people want flexible payment choices, so be open to offering cash, mobile, and credit card transactions.

9. Find the Right Insurance

Every business, even seasonal work comes with risks. Working on snow and ice exposes you, your workers, and your clients’ properties to danger, such as:

Accidents: An essential part of your business are your trucks. If they’re damaged as the result of an accident you could be left paying out-of-pocket without Commercial Auto insurance.

Injuries: Working with snow and ice means your employees are at risk of being injured on the job. Workers Compensation insurance is an essential policy that will pay for the medical and rehabilitation costs in case an employee is injured.

Having the right insurance for snow plowing services is an essential part of keeping your operations going in case of an unfortunate accident.

10. Have an Off-Season Plan

The end of winter doesn’t need to mean the end of your business. Now is the time to create an off-season plan for next year’s success. Check all your equipment, look out for off-season deals on supplies, and starting looking for prospective clients for next season.

With these simple tips in mind, you’ll be on the road to success in no time!

Related Articles:

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  • How to Get your Snow Removal Business Ready for the Winter Rush

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How to start a snow plowing business

Tips and Insights You’ll Need to Start and Run a Snow Removal Business

In this post, you’ll find a vast and unique collection of resources to help you when starting and running a snow removal business. Various authors produce these resources, giving you a wide perspective of starting and running your snow removal business.

Before you get to the resource section further down the page, let’s go over a few important issues for you to review before you start your business.

Background About This Type of Business

Depending on your location, snow removal may be a business where you’re busy for most of the winter season, or you may have bursts of work while most of your winter is laid back.

A snow removal business may be a good add-on for other seasonal businesses, like landscaping and lawn mowing. One of the benefits of this is that clients you already have for lawn care would be the same customers, and now you have revenue year-round.

Is There a Demand for Snow Removal?

Naturally, when it snows, the demand for snow removal increases. But is there a lot of snow plowing services in the area? Are people shoveling their own driveways? Or it could be that it rarely snows in the area, and there isn’t enough demand to support a business. These are the type of issues you need to look at before investing in this type of service. See, What Is the Demand for Your Products and Services, for more on this issue.

Will You Operate From Home or a Commercial Location?

You can easily run this business from home. Unless you have multiple crews and a fleet of vehicles where a commercial location would make more sense. For more see, The Pros and Cons of Starting a Business From Home.

What Type of Company Structure Will You Setup?

There are different types of structures you can choose to create your company. As a sole proprietorship, you and the business are considered one. If you create a partnership or corporation, the business is a separate entity, which reduces your liability. For more on this topic, see, How to Register Your Business Using These Resources.

Pros and Cons

All businesses have pros and cons. Below are a few that come to mind for a snow removal service.

PROS:

  • Snow removal can be a good add-on for other seasonal businesses, such as landscaping.
  • This business can be run part-time.
  • You can run this business from home.

CONS:

  • Your revenue depends on the amount of snowfall.
  • You could be swamped or have no work at all.
  • It’s a seasonal business.
  • You may not be able to keep up during a heavy snowfall unless you have multiple crews.
  • You may be liable if you have a contract and fail to remove snow effectively and someone has a slip because of the snow and ice.
  • Your equipment is susceptible to quickly rust due to salt and moisture.

You’ll find more pros and cons in the resource sections further down the page.

Startup Cost

Your startup cost will depend on the type of setup you plan.

Suppose you plan to have a fleet of snowplows and multiple crews while operating from a commercial location. That set up will cost you more than putting a plow on a truck you already own. Or using your snowblower and maintaining a few homes in your neighborhood.

To get an estimate of your startup costs, make a detailed plan of how you will set up and run your business. For more see, Estimating Startup Costs: Are You Missing Anything?

Profitability and Revenue

The profit and revenue for a snow removal service will depend on how large your operation is. A few houses will differ from having a few hundred customers.

Your expenses will affect your profits. For example, having a crew will allow you to service more customers, but you’ll increase expenses, reducing profits. For more, see Estimating the Profitability and Revenue for a New Business.

Most importantly, the weather will greatly affect how much revenue you can earn during the winter months. You’ll find examples and information in the resources further down the page.

Insurance

You’ll want to get sufficient insurance to cover you and others in case of an accident. You’ll want to speak with an experienced broker. Keep in mind some policies may be expensive due to the liability involved. I recall seeing a news article that many snow removal services could not afford and, in some cases, couldn’t find insurance.

Don’t make the mistake of removing snow as a business without the proper insurance. There is a list of companies in the resources that offer insurance for snow removal businesses. Take some time to go over the sites and articles to better understand what you’re in for.

Equipment

Your equipment will be a large part of your startup costs. You may already own a snowblower and truck and require a plow and other items, or you may need to purchase everything.

You can purchase used or opt for new equipment. If you plan on purchasing used, you may be purchasing problems. You want to make sure you focus on the condition. You don’t want your equipment failing.

If you get a big snowstorm and your equipment breaks down, you won’t be able to make up that time. You will lose out on revenue, and you have let your clients down. Your equipment must be in excellent running order to handle the rigid use during a storm. You’ll find companies in the resources below that offer snow removal equipment.

Getting the Word Out and Getting Customers

Suppose you have another seasonal business, such as landscaping. In that case, many of your customers will be the ones you already service and may be enough to keep you busy.

If not, you can gain customers by distributing flyers in the area you plan to serve and taking out ads in the local newspaper and on the Radio.

You can also place a large sign that acts as a mini-billboard on your truck and drive around town. While running errands and shopping, be sure to park it in the shopping parking lots to gain attention.

You want to make sure your contact information is easy to read. You could write something like, “For a limited time accepting new clients in the Metro area. Call Now To Reserve.”

Your next step is to look deeper into this business model. You’ll find the advice, insights, and what others have experienced in this industry.

Going over these resources will allow you to make informed decisions. There are many resources to go over, and you can’t go over all of them in one session. The good news is you can come back anytime you need to use them.

SNOW REMOVAL BUSINESS PLAN PDF SAMPLE

Is snow plowing profitable? Do you know how to start a snow removal business in Canada? Snow removal businesses are seasonal. If you have considered establishing one before, you should know that it requires proper planning.

This snow removal business plan provides you with helpful tips on what is required to start one. We consider some of the basic needs such as tools and equipment as well as business structures that contribute to its success.

Using this sample, you are able to organize your business to run effectively.

Here is a sample business plan for starting a snow plow business.

A Seasonal Business

You need to know that this is a seasonal business available during the winter season. This is unlike many other businesses which are open all year round. Understanding its complexities is necessary to its success. When the winter season is over, and Spring commences, demand for your services will dry up. What you do with your time is totally up to you.

If you interested, here is what it takes to secure snow removal contracts.

Have an Implementable Plan

Your business plan is highly important and will determine how successful your business turns out. It should be such that its contents are easily implementable. A well written plan eliminates all forms of second-guessing and sets the tone for robust and sustainable growth.

Do you have the Required Funding?

This is a crucial part of doing business. Adequate funding is a major determinant to its success. For your snow removal business to take off, capital is needed to purchase equipment as well as getting an office. This can be substantial depending on the scale of the business. However for a new snow removal business, it is assumed that you will be starting on a small scale.

  • Apply for a Loan

We said funding is crucial to the success of your snow removal business. Hence it is necessary to apply for a loan.

Banks are willing to provide credit for businesses. You can take advantage of this to establish your business. Your business plan is an important document that will be required by the bank. Before accepting a loan, you should be wary of the interest rate on such loans.

Getting the Right Equipment

When planning to start a snow removal business, you need to consider this as very important. Getting the right equipment can make a world of difference. There are several brands you can choose from. Each of these brands equipment brands have proven to be reliable.

Some of them include Troy-Bilt, PowerSmart, Honda, Cub Cadet, Briggs & Stratton, and Ryobi among others.

  • Snow Removal Equipment you will Need

The following are some the basic equipment required. These include; Snow Ploughs, Snow Plough Mounts, Salt Spreaders, Snow Blower Tractor Attachments, Shovels and Work wear. Others are Tire Chains, Traction Control, Ice Melt, Snow Blower (cordless, gas or electric powered), Snow Blower (Single-Stage, Two-Stage or Three Stage).

These are some of the basic equipment you need. However before purchasing any, you will need to do some assessment as well as a little online research to determine which type or brand to purchase.

  • Equipment Upgrade

As demand for your services grow, and as you handle larger clients (businesses), you will need an equipment upgrade. This increases efficiency and significantly reduces the time required to get the job done. Such include bigger ploughs among others.

Get a Good Insurance Cover for your Business

Obtaining a good insurance cover is one of the major requirements for starting a successful snow removal business. This protects your business from liability. It is important that your take your time to choose the best insurance partner. There are those with excellent plans that will fit your business needs.

Planning for Off-Season

This is the off-peak season when supply is down. Thus, you need to find creative ways to prepare for the next season.

During such a time, you can carry out maintenance jobs on your snow removal tools and equipment. Also, this is the best time to get good deals on winter supplies. You are able to cut down on cost while getting premium equipment as well as keeping existing equipment in good condition in readiness for the next winter season.

Apply for a License

To start a snow removal business, you need to obtain necessary permits and licensing. Different cities and counties may have varying requirements for this. It is necessary to find out from your city what the requirements are for a snow removal business. By filling the necessary paperwork, you will be ready to launch your business.

Location Counts

The winter season is synonymous with snow. However sparsely populated areas do not have high demand as compared to densely populated cities. There is greater demand for snow removal services in densely populated cities.

You may want to consider the viability of your business idea. If your preferred location is in a sparsely populated town, then you know that demand for your services will be much less compared to a city.

Choosing the Right Legal Structure for your Business

There are different types of business structures that confer certain advantages and opportunities to businesses.

You need to consider what type of structure fits your snow removal business plans. The good thing with choosing a business structure is that it is never fixed. You can change to any structure when circumstances demand.

The most common of these are Sole Proprietorships, Partnerships, Limited Liability Companies and so forth.

Having a well-written snow removal business plan can determine the success of your business. The less complicated your plan is the better. When writing your plan it is necessary to not only look at the present, but to also consider where you want your snow removal business in the short, medium and long term periods.