How to stop drinking beer

Do you drink every day and are wondering if you are an alcoholic? Do you find yourself feeling guilty about your alcohol consumption? Is it possibly affecting your life in negative ways? If you are one of those people wondering if your level of drinking alcohol is at an unhealthy level, there are a few facts you might want to know.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, moderate alcohol consumption is defined as one drink a day for women and up to two drinks a day for men. They also define binge drinking as typically occurring after 4 drinks for women and 5 drinks for men in a time span of about 2 hours. Heavy alcohol use is classified as binge drinking on 5 or more days in the past month. A man is considered to be at risk for developing Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) if he drinks 4 drinks in one day or up to 14 drinks every week. A woman is considered to be at risk for developing Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) if she has 3 drinks on any single day and no more than 7 drinks per week.

How to stop drinking beer(Gabor Kenyeres/Shutterstock)

Information About Alcohol Consumption

If you have a drink every day, you should keep some important facts in mind. Men and women are not equal when it comes to consuming alcohol. According to the B.R.A.D. website that reports on and encourages responsible drinking, women absorb alcohol into their bloodstream faster than men. They also metabolize it slower. Women who drink regularly are at a much greater risk for liver disease than men. More women who are alcoholics die from cirrhosis of the liver than men.

Whether you are a man or woman, alcohol goes directly into the bloodstream and affects every system in the body. For men, excessive drinking can cause decreased amount of testosterone and cause impotence. It is a nervous system depressant for both men and women. The small intestine rapidly absorbs alcohol, and it goes into the bloodstream. Peak blood alcohol levels occur 60 to 90 minutes after ingestion on an empty stomach.

If you are curious to know how your drinking behavior stacks up to other adults in the United States, B.R.A.D. shares the following drinking statistics:

• Binge drinking is more common for women than men.
• You are classified as a light drinker if you have 3 or few drinks per week.
• 5% of adults are classified as heavy drinkers. This means 7 or more drinks per week for women and 14 or more per week for men.
• 20% of adults had more than 5 drinks per day at least once in the last year.

Casual Drinking or Alcoholism?

There are notable differences between casual drinking and problems with alcoholism. It is important to remember that alcoholism takes many forms and there really is no stereotype. So how do you tell the difference between having a few drinks with a friend on a regular basis or if you have an alcohol addiction? Having a few drinks with friends, wine at dinner does not mean you have an alcohol addiction. Furthermore, there is a difference between alcohol abuse and alcohol addiction. The term alcoholism is an addiction where the individual has a physical or psychological need to consume alcohol. Abuse is a pattern of behavior where someone drinks in excess despite the consequences. It is important to distinguish the types of drinking.

Some people are classified as heavy drinkers. Men who are under the age of 65 and have more than 14 drinks in a week are considered heavy drinkers. Women or men over the age of 65 who consume more than 3 drinks a day, or more than seven a week, are considered heavy drinkers. Binge drinkers are those who drink large amounts of alcohol at one sitting. Men who have five or more drinks in two hours, or women who have four or more in two hours, are considered binge drinkers.

Signs of Alcoholism

If you are not sure what category you fit into, and you are trying to determine if you have an alcohol problem, there are signs which may help you determine if you are an alcoholic or are in danger of becoming one:

• If you find yourself neglecting responsibilities or having low performance at work at school
• Not paying attention to family members or not meeting commitments because you are drunk or hung over
• Driving while intoxicated or mixing alcohol with medication
• Putting your life or the life of others in danger
• Using alcohol as a way to distress every day, or especially after an argument or stressful situation
• Drinking even though you know it upsets your spouse or family members and fighting with those who criticize your drinking habits

It is normal to have a few drinks with friends and family to de-stress. However, if you become physically or emotionally dependent on alcohol every day in order to relieve your stress, you may have a problem. If you find that you are constantly thinking about your next drink, and you have tried to limit your drinking but have never succeeded, you may be addicted.

The bottom line is that alcohol is a drug. Alcoholism arises as you develop a tolerance. The more you drink, the less you become susceptible to the effects. If you drink repetitively, the body begins to expect alcohol to be present in your system. That leads to alcohol withdrawal syndrome which is when the body reacts to a lack of alcohol in the bloodstream.

Take an Objective Look at Your Drinking

Now that you know the facts, you can objectively look at your patterns of behavior when it comes to drinking. Identify your drinking habits and decide if the amount of alcohol you consume is at an unhealthy level. If it is, you may be a binge drinker or you are not using good judgment when it comes to your alcohol consumption. Try modifying your drinking habits If you can do so easily, you can be successful spending a period of time not drinking alcohol. If modifying or cutting back is a problem, then you should seriously consider the fact that you may have an alcohol addiction. Seek help immediately to decrease your risk of permanent health issues. You can get your life and your health back on track.

Not necessarily. Although they have fewer calories, many light beers have almost as much alcohol as regular beer—about 85% as much, or 4.2% versus 5.0% alcohol by volume, on average.

Check the alcohol content of your beverage. Malt beverages are not required to list their alcohol content on the labels, so you may need to visit the bottler’s Web site.

How many “drinks” are in a bottle of wine?

A typical 25-ounce (750 ml) bottle of table wine holds about 5 “standard” drinks, each containing about 5 ounces. This serving size of wine contains about the same amount of alcohol as a 12-ounce regular beer or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof spirits.

Get to know what 5 ounces looks like by measuring it out at home. That way you can estimate how many standard drinks you’re being served in a restaurant or bar that uses large glasses and generous serving sizes.

Mixing alcohol with certain medications can cause nausea, headaches, drowsiness, fainting, a loss of coordination, internal bleeding, heart problems, and difficulties in breathing. Alcohol can also make a medication less effective. For more information, see Harmful Interactions: Mixing Alcohol with Medicines.

Examples of medical conditions for which it’s safest to avoid drinking include liver disease (such as from hepatitis C), bipolar disorder, abnormal heart rhythm, and chronic pain.

Among the dangers of underage drinking:

  • Each year, an estimated 5,000 people under age 21 die from alcohol-related injuries.
  • The younger people are when they start to drink, the more likely they are to develop alcohol use disorder at some point in their lives.
  • Underage drinking is illegal—an arrest can lead to losing a job, a driver’s license, or a college scholarship.

Even moderate amounts of alcohol can significantly impair driving performance and your ability to operate other machinery, whether or not you feel the effects of alcohol.

Heavy drinking during pregnancy can cause brain damage and other serious problems in the baby. Because it is not yet known whether any amount of alcohol is safe for a developing baby, women who are pregnant or may become pregnant should not drink.

Highest risk

About 50% of people who drink in this group have alcohol use disorder.

Increased risk

This “increased risk” category contains three different drinking pattern groups. Overall, nearly 20% of people who drink in this category have alcohol use disorder.

Low-risk drinking

Only about 2% of drinkers in this group has alcohol use disorder.

A U.S. standard drink contains about 0.6 fluid ounces or 14 grams of pure alcohol (also known as an alcoholic drink-equivalent). That’s the amount in 12 ounces of regular beer, 5 ounces of table wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits.

How to stop drinking beer

Distilled spirits include vodka, whiskey, gin, rum, and tequila.

Light to moderate drinking

  • Men: Up to 2 drinks per day
  • Women: Up to 1 drink per day

Heavy or at-risk drinking

  • Men: More than 4 drinks on any day or more than 14 drinks per week
  • Women: More than 3 drinks on any day or more than 7 drinks per week

Low-risk drinking

Men: No more than 4 drinks on any day and no more than 14 per week

Women: No more than 3 drinks on any day and no more than 7 per week

People with a parent, grandparent, or other close relative with alcoholism have a higher risk for becoming dependent on alcohol. For many, it may be difficult to maintain low-risk drinking habits.

Pace yourself: It’s best to have no more than one standard drink per hour, with nonalcoholic “drink spacers” between alcohol beverages. On any day, stay within low-risk levels of no more than 4 drinks for men or 3 for women. Note that it takes about 2 hours for the adult body to completely break down a single drink. Do not drive after drinking.

For comparison, regular beer is 5% alcohol by volume (alc/vol), table wine is about 12% alc/vol, and straight 80-proof distilled spirits is 40% alc/vol.

The percent alcohol by volume (alc/vol) for distilled spirits is listed on bottle labels and may be found online as well. It is half the “proof,” such that 80-proof spirits is 40% alc/vol.

Convert proof to alc/vol

Enter in the proof of the alcohol in the left field to automatically calculate the alc/vol.

Before you try to achieve sobriety, you need to think about your drinking habits. The way that a social drinker stops drinking is different from the way that a high-functioning alcoholic quits drinking. People with the disease of alcoholism require formal treatment. Those who aren’t addicted to alcohol may be able to quit on their own or with the help of friends.

You can find out if you’re addicted to alcohol by taking an alcoholism assessment quiz. These quizzes help you determine whether you meet the criteria for an alcohol use disorder — the medical term for alcoholism, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse. The diagnostic criteria for an alcohol use disorder were published in the American Psychiatric Association’s fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

You can decide how much help you need to quit drinking based on the results of the quiz.

How to Stop Drinking

Once you know how much of a role alcohol plays in your life, you can figure out how to quit drinking. Unfortunately, abstaining from alcohol isn’t a simple process. Things that work for some people don’t necessarily work for others.

If you’re a casual drinker, saying no to peer pressure may not be easy. You may see a friend who is a casual drinker say no when offered a drink and wonder why it’s easy for them. He or she may not need self-help tools, but those resources might work for you.

Similarly, some alcoholics may be able to stop drinking with the help of Alcoholics Anonymous. Others need residential rehab and long-term aftercare support. If one strategy doesn’t work for you, try another.

Quitting Cold Turkey

Stopping alcohol use abruptly is the riskiest way to quit drinking. If you feel physical cravings or withdrawal symptoms when you quit drinking, you shouldn’t try to stop cold turkey. Casual or social drinkers may be able to quit cold turkey.

Dr. Kevin Wandler of Advanced Recovery Systems describes the potentially life-threatening withdrawal symptoms that can occur when a person quits drinking alcohol cold turkey.

Tapering

People who are physically dependent on alcohol should gradually reduce, or taper, their alcohol intake. Dependence is different from addiction. People who are dependent but not addicted to alcohol may not require rehab.

Asking for Support

Almost everyone who struggles to quit drinking requires some form of peer support. As with any goal, quitting alcohol is easier if you have friends and family members supporting you. They can encourage you to stay sober and help you find other healthy ways to have fun.

Allison Walsh of Advanced Recovery Systems illustrates how peer support can help individuals in recovery avoid relapse.

Self-Help Books

Self-help books can boost your confidence and motivate you to stay sober. They provide strategies and tools to help you maintain sobriety. Numerous self-help books are available in print or online.

Smartphone Apps

The app store on your cellphone has several sobriety apps that can inspire you to quit drinking and stay sober. Some apps help you keep track of alcohol intake or sobriety dates. Others provide daily motivational quotes. They may help you quit drinking, but most of these apps haven’t been medically reviewed.

Support Groups

Alcoholic support groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, provide free help for people struggling to quit drinking. People with minor alcohol problems or people who have already received treatment for moderate or severe alcohol problems usually benefit from AA.

Alcohol Counseling

Anyone experiencing problems with alcohol can benefit from counseling and therapy. A counselor can help you develop personalized strategies to get sober. Counseling can be simple or intensive depending on the severity of your drinking problems.

Alcohol Rehab

If you’ve struggled to quit drinking or overcome alcoholism, you may require rehab. Formal treatment for alcohol addiction allows you to detox in a safe environment and provides comprehensive therapy to teach you how to stay sober.

In general, it’s better to put time and effort into sobriety than to try to do the bare minimum. If you’ve struggled to quit drinking, you should consider support groups, counseling or rehab. Self-help books or apps are less likely to help you successfully quit if you are addicted to alcohol.

Help for Alcoholics: Where to Find Sobriety Resources

People with alcohol use disorders don’t have to look far to find help. Almost every community in the United States has community initiatives, support group meetings and some form of help for alcoholics.

Those seeking assistance while working to overcome alcoholism can talk to a therapist or expert in person or on the phone.

  • Alcoholism hotlines: Several toll-free hotlines provide free information for people with alcohol use disorders or loved ones of people affected by alcoholism.
  • Other alcohol-related resources: Several websites, support groups and nonprofit organizations can help you learn about overcoming alcoholism and staying sober.
  • Rehab facilities: Addiction treatment centers can provide over-the-phone assessments and help you determine how your insurance policy covers treatment for alcohol addiction.

If you’re still unsure of how to find help in your community, contact your local hospital or health department. Most health care organizations can direct you to helpful resources near you.

Tips for Those Trying to Stop Drinking

For many people, abstaining from alcohol is a major lifestyle change. It requires a lot of time, effort and mental energy. Some people can decide to quit drinking and do it without help. If you’re reading this page, you probably aren’t one of those people. Don’t compare yourself to them.

Use these tips to increase your chances of overcoming alcohol problems:

  • Stay positive. Quitting is more difficult if you have a bad attitude.
  • Commit fully. Sobriety isn’t something you can achieve with minimal effort.
  • Ask for help. Getting sober is hard to do on your own.
  • Have faith. When you believe sobriety is possible, you’re more likely to achieve it.
  • Take it one day at a time. Thinking about quitting for a year can seem daunting. Taking things one day at a time is more achievable.

Always think about the benefits of quitting alcohol and how they will improve your life. It may also help to think about the negatives that alcohol causes. With a realistic strategy, support and faith, you can quit drinking and begin alcohol recovery.

Prolonged Drinking Means You May Need Treatment to Minimize Symptoms

  • facebook
  • twitter

Steven Gans, MD is board-certified in psychiatry and is an active supervisor, teacher, and mentor at Massachusetts General Hospital.

How to stop drinking beer

Verywell / JR Bee

When you suddenly stop or cut back on drinking after chronic or prolonged use of alcohol, you might experience the physical and psychological symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.   Depending on how long you have used alcohol and how much you typically drink, the severity of these symptoms can range from mild to severe.

Causes

Alcohol is a depressant, which means that it slows your brain.   When a person drinks heavily, frequently, or for prolonged periods of time, their brain compensates for alcohol’s depressant effects by releasing more stimulating chemicals (compared to when a person does not drink). Overproduction becomes the brain’s new normal.

When a person stops drinking, their brain is still producing extra chemicals, which can potentially cause unpleasant alcohol withdrawal symptoms that are associated with overstimulation. The brain will readjust, but until it does, a person in withdrawal might feel unwell.

Symptoms

Not everyone who quits drinking alcohol experiences withdrawal symptoms, but many people who have been drinking for a long period of time, drink frequently, or drink heavily, will experience some withdrawal symptoms if they stop using alcohol suddenly.

There are several mild to moderate psychological and physical symptoms you might experience when you stop drinking.  

Difficulty thinking clearly

Feeling jumpy or nervous

Irritability or becoming excited easily

Rapid emotional changes

Elevated blood pressure

Loss of appetite

Nausea and vomiting

Rapid heart rate or palpitations

Sweating, especially the palms of your hands or your face

Tremor of your hands

Delirium Tremens

A severe type of alcohol withdrawal is called delirium tremens (or DTs). It can occur anywhere from two to four days to up a week after you have your last drink. DTs might be more likely to happen if you are malnourished.

DT can be life-threatening: about one in 20 people who develop the condition die from it.   If you or a loved one has symptoms of DT, seek immediate emergency medical care.

The symptoms of delirium tremens include:

  • Agitation
  • Confusion (which can be severe)
  • Dangerous changes in blood pressure
  • Excessive sweating
  • Fever
  • Hallucinations
  • Heart arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)
  • Rapid changes in mood
  • Seizures
  • Sensitivity to touch, light, and/or sound
  • Tremors

The symptoms of DT may get rapidly worse and can be fatal. A person with delirium tremens needs to be hospitalized until the symptoms can be controlled.

Duration

People who suddenly stop drinking and develop alcohol withdrawal symptoms often have two main questions: “Is this normal?” and “How long does it last?”

Withdrawal is different for everyone; there really is no “normal” and it can be hard to predict an individual person’s experience.

It’s typical for withdrawal symptoms to begin within hours to a day or two after you have your last drink. Symptoms are often at their worst around 24 to 72 hours after you stop drinking.  

Some symptoms—like changes in sleep patterns, fatigue, and mood swings—can last for weeks or months. You’ll likely begin to feel better around five days to a week after you stop drinking.

Treatment

Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can be greatly reduced or even eliminated with proper medical care. There are specific treatments available for anyone who wants to stop drinking—even after long-term, chronic alcohol abuse.

Withdrawal symptoms can be a significant stumbling block in maintaining sobriety. For example, a person might be hesitant to stop drinking because they are afraid of alcohol withdrawal.

Symptoms of withdrawal are also a major causes of relapses in the early stages of recovery. People who are trying to stop drinking might give up if the symptoms of withdrawal become aggravating enough to prompt them to have a drink to ease the discomfort.

If your withdrawal symptoms are mild, it’s generally considered safe for you to stop drinking at home. However, if you drank heavily or for a long time, you need to involve a healthcare provider in the process.

It’s impossible to predict how severe withdrawal symptoms will be, and you need to be monitored by a professional to ensure you get care in the event you develop serious, potentially life-threatening symptoms (such as DT).

If the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal are severe enough to threaten someone’s recovery, there are medical treatments—including benzodiazepines like Librium (chlordiazepoxide) and Ativan (lorazepam)—that can help control symptoms.

Getting Help

Once you have gone through withdrawal, you’ll also need a plan to remain alcohol-free. Start by talking to your healthcare provider about the treatment options for alcohol dependence.

There are many resources available for anyone who is ready to stop drinking for good, or who wants to reduce the harm alcohol is causing in their life by cutting down. As you continue to commit to long-term recovery, support group meetings like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or online support communities might be helpful.  

If you or a loved one are struggling with substance use or addiction, contact the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) National Helpline at 1-800-662-4357 for information on support and treatment facilities in your area.

For more mental health resources, see our National Helpline Database.

How to stop drinking beer

How to stop drinking beer

Maybe your nightly glass of vino has turned into two or three. Or you’re overdoing it on the beer and have the paunch to prove it.

Whether you want to clean up your diet or you’re trying to nip a potential issue in the bud, giving up alcohol can be tough—but the benefits make it worth the effort, says Damon Raskin, MD, a Los Angeles–based physician who is board certified in addiction medicine.

“Taking a break from drinking alcohol—even if it’s just for a couple of weeks—is a good idea, especially if you’re regularly consuming more than the recommended daily limit,” Raskin says. (By the way, that limit is generally defined as a drink a day for women and two for men.)

Also, if your drinking seems to be affecting your work or personal relationships—regardless of how much hooch you’re knocking back—it’s time to consider taking it easy, he adds. (Try this 12-day liver detox for total body health!)

Here’s what you can expect to happen, both short- and long-term, if you give up alcohol:

1. You’ll sleep more soundly.
One recent study in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research found drinking before bed increases alpha wave patterns in the brain—a kind of cerebral activity that usually occurs when you’re awake but resting. The result? Disrupted sleep. Another review of 27 studies found that while alcohol may help people fall asleep more quickly and deeply at first, it seriously screws with sleep quality after that initial restful period. You may toss and turn a bit at first, but give up alcohol and the sleep you get will likely leave you feeling more refreshed and sharp the next day. The byproducts of better sleep: improved mood, concentration, and mental performance, Raskin says.

2. You’ll consume less at dinner.

How to stop drinking beer

3. You may feel new sugar cravings.
Sugar boosts levels of the “reward” chemical dopamine, which fuels feelings of pleasure, Raskin says. Alcohol does the same thing. So it’s very possible that when you give up one substance that causes happy-making chemicals to float around your brain, you’ll be more likely to reach for the other. “Don’t be surprised if you try to get that same enjoyment or rush you used to get after a drink from something sweet,” he says. (Check out these 25 sugar-free ways to beat a craving.)

4. Pounds will start to fall off.
Alcohol has a sneaky way of increasing your daily calorie intake without you realizing it. One margarita may contain 300 calories or more—mostly from sugar. (A delicious piña colada might have 450 calories!) One study found men consume an additional 433 calories on those days they drink a “moderate” amount of alcohol. For women, it’s 300 calories. Cut those from your diet—and don’t replace them with desserts—and you’ll start to lose weight without much effort.

5. Hello, clear complexion.
Within a few days, you’ll notice your skin looking and feeling more hydrated. That’s because alcohol is a diuretic, causing you to urinate more, Raskin says. Alcohol also decreases the body’s production of antidiuretic hormone, which helps the body reabsorb water. (Less water in the body equals parched-looking skin.) Ruddiness in your cheeks and around your nose may also start to fade, and other skin conditions—such as dandruff, eczema, or rosacea—may also improve, Raskin says.

6. You’ll have more money.

How to stop drinking beer

7. Envy will overcome you when you’re around others who are drinking.
It’s important to understand that there will be times when you feel like you’re missing out—and it can make you pretty testy, Raskin says. “People often use alcohol as a lubricant for emotions, and when they stop drinking they may feel agitated and restless,” he adds. (Do you have a problem? Check out these sneaky signs you’re drinking too much.)

8. Your risk for cancer falls, though your heart disease risk may creep up.
According to the National Cancer Institute, alcohol use has been linked to an increased risk for cancers of the mouth, liver, breast, colon, and rectum. The risk increases the more you drink. On the other hand, multiple studies have shown moderate alcohol consumption may lower your odds of heart trouble. More research suggests your risk for stroke, diabetes, and mortality may all rise slightly when you give up booze—assuming you were a light drinker before you quit.

How to stop drinking beer

The physical consequences of heavy alcohol use, such as liver damage and high blood pressure, are well known. Alcohol use at any level, however, is also bad news for the brain.

Even moderate users or those who have been drinking in excess for a short period of time can experience mental fog, anxiety, and mood changes.

For people who have alcohol use disorder, binge drink, or have been using alcohol for many years, brain changes affecting cognitive function and mood can become severe and debilitating.

The good news is that by quitting alcohol, even those who have spent years throwing off the balance of their brains can begin to heal and restore the brain’s natural function. Here are some of the changes that will occur in your brain once you stop drinking.

Regeneration of the Frontal Lobe

The frontal lobe of the brain, responsible for many critical functions including reasoning, behavior control, memory, and motor function, takes a heavy hit when you drink in excess.

Years of alcohol abuse can damage this area of the brain extensively, leading to a wide variety of issues including memory loss and the inability to think rationally.

While people in early recovery may still suffer from these symptoms, as well as an inability to process large amounts of information, new cell growth will eventually begin to repair this damage as time passes.

Rational decision-making and impulse control are crucial in fighting addiction, and luckily these powerful functions of the brain will return as you begin to heal.

Dopamine Levels Begin to Normalize

Alcohol abuse creates a complex imbalance of dopamine in the brain.

Dopamine release is triggered when you engage in activities you find pleasurable, such as eating chocolate or playing sports, and it teaches your brain what actions to repeat, and eventually, to crave.

Alcohol use overloads the brain with dopamine, while also reducing the brain’s dopamine receptors in the process. When you first quit drinking, the lack of dopamine and diminished receptors can lead to feelings of sadness and hopelessness.

Both excessively high and abnormally low levels of dopamine can have adverse effects, but over time your brain will begin to normalize dopamine levels as well as your brain’s response to the chemical without the intrusion of alcohol.

Motivation Returns

As mentioned above, early recovery might mean struggling with mood and overall mental wellness, but as your body and brain begin to heal, you will experience renewed motivation towards healthy habits in your life.

This means you will be able to take up new activities that boost your mood and stimulate cell growth in the brain, such as daily exercise.

The early days of sobriety can be draining and challenging for anyone recovering from addiction, but a balanced and healthy brain will return, and with it, a sense of heightened motivation towards positive goals.

Serotonin Production Increases

While the short-term effect of alcohol may boost serotonin, a chemical that increases feelings of happiness and wellbeing, the long-term repercussions of heavy alcohol use often include a decrease in serotonin production, leading to an increased chance of depression.

Once you quit drinking, serotonin production can eventually return to normal. If you continue to struggle with depressive symptoms during recovery, you may require medication.

By eliminating alcohol from the equation, you can better understand your mental health and determine what it is you need to feel your best.

Healthy Activity Returns as You Learn New Skills

For many chronic drinkers, alcohol becomes a crutch to handle many situations and emotions in daily life. You may have used alcohol to become more outgoing, manage stress, or combat depression.

While alcohol isn’t a cure for any of these problems, it can numb your natural response to life’s circumstances and make it hard to function without it. While early sobriety can be challenging, for this reason, experiencing life without alcohol means that you must learn new coping mechanisms and social skills.

This is an opportunity for your brain power to grow and evolve as you begin to participate in the same activities as you have before, but while sober.

Depending on how long you have been a heavy drinker, entering recovery may mean you are socializing and emotion-managing sober for the first time.

With the acquisition of each new coping skill and the evolution of emotional maturity, your brain builds new connections and creates pathways for healthy interactions in the future.

While the damage you can inflict on your brain with heavy alcohol use is disturbing, it is entirely possible to experience recovery from addiction and begin to heal from the inside out.

We are The Nation’s Leading Center For Mindfulness & 12 Step Addiction Treatment

Enhance Recovery with Mindfulness

We help people with addictions and substance use disorders recover. We use the ancient practice of mindfulness with the 12 Steps to help you find deep healing and recovery.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, now is the time to reach out for help. At Renewal Lodge by Burning Tree, you will find a team of compassionate, knowledgeable professionals ready to coach each client through the 12-steps and beyond.

By structuring treatment to fit individual needs, including the identification of co-occurring disorders, Burning Tree facilitates an environment of healing and holistic wellness.

Here, our clients tackle their addictions head-on and harness the power to restructure their lives through high accountability and life skills that foster lasting sobriety.

We believe that with the right tools, you can put an end to the cycle of addiction. For more information on how we can help, call us to learn more at (877) 874-8695

How to stop drinking beer

Alcohol overconsumption – not that’s a sure shot method of running your life, and that of people around you and dependent on you. The worst part – it’s easy to feel helpless and consider quitting simply More often than not, alcohol and alcoholic beverages are seen as solutions to problems and stressful situations but the truth is, alcohol is nothing but trouble.

Whether you are an alcohol addict looking for solace or just hoping to make healthier choices in life, natural remedies are the best way to go. They not only help you with the alcohol problem but also repair the damage already inflicted upon you and your life by alcohol. They also inexpensive, easy, and introduce a lot of positivity to your routine. Without further ado, here are seven of the best natural remedies to quit drinking alcohol.

7 Home Remedies for stop drinking alcohol

1. One step at a time

Giving up alcohol completely in a week or two could be a challenging task to most people, especially if they are alcoholic or at the verge of alcoholism. The best approach here is to reduce the amount of consumption slowly and consistently. Craving is the enemy to be targeted here. The natural way to reduce craving is to drink apple juice at least twice a day. The visual similarity to alcohol is a plus when it comes to choosing apple from all of the fruits to be juiced. Replacing the reduced the number of drinks with apple juice will help in cutting down the excessive tendency for consumption of fluids.

2. Say bye-bye to boredom

Keeping alcohol out of your mind should be of highest priority when trying to stop drinking alcohol. Take up a hobby or invest your time and energy into something that you’ve always wanted to learn, say, painting for example. Learning a new art form is difficult but it’s definitely going to be worth it. It results in two positive outcomes instead of one – you will quit drinking and have a new skill. Playing with vibrant colors and silly (or really complicated) drawings are bound to cheer up your spirit. Bring in some friends to join you to stay motivated and to make some beautiful and colorful memories to celebrate your path to sobriety.

3. Bitter gourd for a bittersweet life

Bitter gourd is the go-to vegetable for a guaranteed way out of alcoholism. It is a method that has worked on several people who have suffered from alcohol addiction for a very long time. Drink the juice of bitter gourd as soon as you wake up every morning for maximum effect. Apart from controlling alcohol consumption, bitter gourd is capable of repairing the damage caused to liver cells by prolonged alcohol addictions. Kidneys also suffer from alcohol usage and bitter gourd repairs them as well. The taste might be a little hard to handle but mix them with some buttermilk and you’re good to go.

4. Herbs are here to the rescue

Milk thistle is a herb that is often prescribed to cure liver damage caused by alcohol addiction. Using it on a daily basis will help curb the addiction as well as repair the damage already done. Several other herbs are also there to help you change up your usage patterns to prevent getting bored with a single herb. Skullcap and evening Primrose are just two of the remaining options available. Herbs are the ultimate natural remedy to quit drinking alcohol and prepare for a healthier lifestyle.

5. Juice to lose the addiction

Fruit juices are an easy way to replace your regular alcoholic choices. Go on a juice diet for about ten days and mix up the regimen with all of the fruits that you love. Mix and match them, add unusual flavors, and experiment with the unlimited choices that juicing offers. Orange, Pineapple and apple juices are top choices for most people who are trying to quit drinking alcohol. The initial days might be tough but soon you’ll warm up to and enjoy the process of picking fruits and planning your juices and schedules. The eleventh day you wouldn’t even think about beer, forget alcohol!

6. Sow the seeds for a healthier life

Carom seeds are slightly brown, oval shaped seeds that resemble cumin. They have several therapeutic usages throughout Ayurveda treatment regiments. To prevent alcohol consumption, add about 500g of carom sends to eight liters of water and boil it down to nearly two liters. Filter the liquid and store in a clean cool place. Drink three to four teaspoons of this liquid whenever you get a craving for alcohol. Carom seeds are commonly used to solve gastrointestinal problems and will ensure a smooth digestive process on the consumption of this liquid regularly apart from quitting alcohol.

7. The grape way to quit alcohol

Grapes are a common fruit used to win the battle against alcohol. Choose a grape diet for about twenty-five to thirty days continuously. Eat only grapes for breakfast, lunch and dinner. No other food should be consumed on this strict diet. This will help to curb your desire for alcohol and alcoholic beverages; but at any point during the diet if you feel unwell, break the diet until you are back in good health.

Here are some of the some of the things you can do to prevent a relapse into alcohol consumption:

  • Out of sight, out of mind. Clear your immediate surroundings of all bottles and instances that trigger the thought of alcohol
  • Do not use alcohol as the solution to any of your problems. When things get tough, talk to a near or dear one rather than turning to alcohol.
  • Surround yourself with the right people. Get together with people who do not drink or have successfully quit alcohol to help you stay motivated.
  • Do not fall for temptations. Celebrations are often accompanied by a large quantity of alcohol. If you really want to stay alcohol free, politely refuse and do not fall for temptations.

How to stop drinking beer

The physical consequences of heavy alcohol use, such as liver damage and high blood pressure, are well known. Alcohol use at any level, however, is also bad news for the brain.

Even moderate users or those who have been drinking in excess for a short period of time can experience mental fog, anxiety, and mood changes.

For people who have alcohol use disorder, binge drink, or have been using alcohol for many years, brain changes affecting cognitive function and mood can become severe and debilitating.

The good news is that by quitting alcohol, even those who have spent years throwing off the balance of their brains can begin to heal and restore the brain’s natural function. Here are some of the changes that will occur in your brain once you stop drinking.

Regeneration of the Frontal Lobe

The frontal lobe of the brain, responsible for many critical functions including reasoning, behavior control, memory, and motor function, takes a heavy hit when you drink in excess.

Years of alcohol abuse can damage this area of the brain extensively, leading to a wide variety of issues including memory loss and the inability to think rationally.

While people in early recovery may still suffer from these symptoms, as well as an inability to process large amounts of information, new cell growth will eventually begin to repair this damage as time passes.

Rational decision-making and impulse control are crucial in fighting addiction, and luckily these powerful functions of the brain will return as you begin to heal.

Dopamine Levels Begin to Normalize

Alcohol abuse creates a complex imbalance of dopamine in the brain.

Dopamine release is triggered when you engage in activities you find pleasurable, such as eating chocolate or playing sports, and it teaches your brain what actions to repeat, and eventually, to crave.

Alcohol use overloads the brain with dopamine, while also reducing the brain’s dopamine receptors in the process. When you first quit drinking, the lack of dopamine and diminished receptors can lead to feelings of sadness and hopelessness.

Both excessively high and abnormally low levels of dopamine can have adverse effects, but over time your brain will begin to normalize dopamine levels as well as your brain’s response to the chemical without the intrusion of alcohol.

Motivation Returns

As mentioned above, early recovery might mean struggling with mood and overall mental wellness, but as your body and brain begin to heal, you will experience renewed motivation towards healthy habits in your life.

This means you will be able to take up new activities that boost your mood and stimulate cell growth in the brain, such as daily exercise.

The early days of sobriety can be draining and challenging for anyone recovering from addiction, but a balanced and healthy brain will return, and with it, a sense of heightened motivation towards positive goals.

Serotonin Production Increases

While the short-term effect of alcohol may boost serotonin, a chemical that increases feelings of happiness and wellbeing, the long-term repercussions of heavy alcohol use often include a decrease in serotonin production, leading to an increased chance of depression.

Once you quit drinking, serotonin production can eventually return to normal. If you continue to struggle with depressive symptoms during recovery, you may require medication.

By eliminating alcohol from the equation, you can better understand your mental health and determine what it is you need to feel your best.

Healthy Activity Returns as You Learn New Skills

For many chronic drinkers, alcohol becomes a crutch to handle many situations and emotions in daily life. You may have used alcohol to become more outgoing, manage stress, or combat depression.

While alcohol isn’t a cure for any of these problems, it can numb your natural response to life’s circumstances and make it hard to function without it. While early sobriety can be challenging, for this reason, experiencing life without alcohol means that you must learn new coping mechanisms and social skills.

This is an opportunity for your brain power to grow and evolve as you begin to participate in the same activities as you have before, but while sober.

Depending on how long you have been a heavy drinker, entering recovery may mean you are socializing and emotion-managing sober for the first time.

With the acquisition of each new coping skill and the evolution of emotional maturity, your brain builds new connections and creates pathways for healthy interactions in the future.

While the damage you can inflict on your brain with heavy alcohol use is disturbing, it is entirely possible to experience recovery from addiction and begin to heal from the inside out.

We are The Nation’s Leading Center For Mindfulness & 12 Step Addiction Treatment

Enhance Recovery with Mindfulness

We help people with addictions and substance use disorders recover. We use the ancient practice of mindfulness with the 12 Steps to help you find deep healing and recovery.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, now is the time to reach out for help. At Renewal Lodge by Burning Tree, you will find a team of compassionate, knowledgeable professionals ready to coach each client through the 12-steps and beyond.

By structuring treatment to fit individual needs, including the identification of co-occurring disorders, Burning Tree facilitates an environment of healing and holistic wellness.

Here, our clients tackle their addictions head-on and harness the power to restructure their lives through high accountability and life skills that foster lasting sobriety.

We believe that with the right tools, you can put an end to the cycle of addiction. For more information on how we can help, call us to learn more at (877) 874-8695