How to tie curtains

Once you have mastered how to tie curtains, you can experiment with different curtain tiebacks that will surely elevate those lovely window treatments. If the concept behind this idea seems pretty straightforward, that’s because it probably is.

The problem is with some people; they tend to mess up the placements of the tieback. Obviously, tiebacks that are either too high or too low down the drapery can make things appear awkward rather than stylish.

Today, we will look at different curtain tiebacks from antique to modern styles that fit rustic and luxurious interior designs . All you need is a quick measuring process, some basic curtain hardware, and of course, your preferred choice of curtain tiebacks.

Different curtain tiebacks

Every home has a unique interior design that fashions a particular style. Whether it is rustic, vintage, modern, contemporary, or grand interior design, several types of curtain tiebacks will complement your interior just fine.

Step 1: Choosing a tieback

There are two main types of curtain tiebacks. The traditional method requires a few curtain hardware, such as simple hooks. Using the tie-back, you can hold your curtain towards the side of your window, allowing more light to shine through.

In some cases, homeowners prefer to tie their windows and let them hang across the middle. That kind of style looks good for casual and relaxed looks. In that case, you can choose between rope-like tie backs or magnetic tie backs that you can clasp together.

If you are a bit indecisive, you should still get yourself a pair of hooks. That way, you can easily decide whether you want your curtains hanging in the middle or side of the window. Changing your mind the next day won’t be a problem since you already have hooks installed. Hiding them won’t be an issue as well.

Step 2: Close your curtains.

The idea is to learn how to tie curtains because tiebacks should help you create an elegant window treatment with the perfect curvature. Close your curtains and secure their placements across the rod. Make sure that they don’t easily move around when you gather the middle sections together.

Step 3: Measure your curtain.

For most people, you can easily decide where your tiebacks should go upon inspection. But if you really want to be precise with your measurements, they usually go between two-thirds to a half of the curtain’s length.

If you are dressing two-story windows or those taller than the regular size, you might want to place your tiebacks at a lower height. It’s not that they won’t look too good higher up. Instead, it will be more accessible if you place it in a lower position.

Grab the middle section and use your hand as a temporary tieback. If you have a rope or any cable ties at home, or anything to hold the fabric, you can use that too. Tie the fabric together and take a step back to see how it looks. You can experiment with different heights until you reach a particular length. Don’t forget to note the measurement.

Step 4: Attach your holdbacks (optional)

This step is optional for those who prefer tied curtains hanging at the center of the window panel. However, if you want them pinned gracefully to the side, then pay attention.

Start by getting yourself some hooks that will hold your tiebacks and curtain. You can opt for decorative holdbacks, which basically look like decorative door knobs that come in all shapes and sizes.

For simple screw hooks, all you need is the piece itself and a powerful tool that will help you drill a hole in the wall. Decorative holdbacks need at least two to three screws, depending on the design. Please attach it to the wall using the measurement you got in step three.

Step 5: Tie the curtain back

Get your curtain tieback and wrap it around the fabric. You can use a typical knot to secure it in place. Adjust the material so that it creates an elegant curve—experiment with loosely tied or tightened knots.

For curtains swayed to the side using a holdback, gather the fabric starting from the middle and gently tug the section to the side. Remember that the top part of your curtain should not move along when you pull the middle section. Tie and secure the curtain in place.

Design Tips

Besides using regular drapery ties that you can get from any store, try to experiment with everyday items, you find in your household. In fact, you can even switch it up with DIY curtain tiebacks using cable ties and decorative materials.

Think outside the box when it comes to decorating your holdbacks. There are clear and plain curtain holdbacks that you can easily customize. Decorate it with some acrylic paint, stickers, or 3D ornaments like floral garlands, bells, and many more.

Don’t have the time to buy a tieback or make your own? That’s okay since you can also tie the curtains with the fabric itself. Keep in mind that this might only work for longer sheer curtains lengths.

Take a bunch of fabric and treat it as a relatively thick piece of rope. Knot the fabric together, and you will have a neatly tied curtain without the use of any curtain tiebacks or holdbacks. You can also experiment with decorative styles of tying the fabric.

Summary

Overall, there are many ways to tie curtains and make them look visually appealing. Find out what works for you, and don’t be afraid of testing the waters.

Once you have mastered how to tie curtains, you can experiment with different curtain tiebacks that will surely elevate those lovely window treatments. If the concept behind this idea seems pretty straightforward, that’s because it probably is.

The problem is with some people; they tend to mess up the placements of the tieback. Obviously, tiebacks that are either too high or too low down the drapery can make things appear awkward rather than stylish.

Today, we will look at different curtain tiebacks from antique to modern styles that fit rustic and luxurious interior designs . All you need is a quick measuring process, some basic curtain hardware, and of course, your preferred choice of curtain tiebacks.

Different curtain tiebacks

Every home has a unique interior design that fashions a particular style. Whether it is rustic, vintage, modern, contemporary, or grand interior design, several types of curtain tiebacks will complement your interior just fine.

Step 1: Choosing a tieback

There are two main types of curtain tiebacks. The traditional method requires a few curtain hardware, such as simple hooks. Using the tie-back, you can hold your curtain towards the side of your window, allowing more light to shine through.

In some cases, homeowners prefer to tie their windows and let them hang across the middle. That kind of style looks good for casual and relaxed looks. In that case, you can choose between rope-like tie backs or magnetic tie backs that you can clasp together.

If you are a bit indecisive, you should still get yourself a pair of hooks. That way, you can easily decide whether you want your curtains hanging in the middle or side of the window. Changing your mind the next day won’t be a problem since you already have hooks installed. Hiding them won’t be an issue as well.

Step 2: Close your curtains.

The idea is to learn how to tie curtains because tiebacks should help you create an elegant window treatment with the perfect curvature. Close your curtains and secure their placements across the rod. Make sure that they don’t easily move around when you gather the middle sections together.

Step 3: Measure your curtain.

For most people, you can easily decide where your tiebacks should go upon inspection. But if you really want to be precise with your measurements, they usually go between two-thirds to a half of the curtain’s length.

If you are dressing two-story windows or those taller than the regular size, you might want to place your tiebacks at a lower height. It’s not that they won’t look too good higher up. Instead, it will be more accessible if you place it in a lower position.

Grab the middle section and use your hand as a temporary tieback. If you have a rope or any cable ties at home, or anything to hold the fabric, you can use that too. Tie the fabric together and take a step back to see how it looks. You can experiment with different heights until you reach a particular length. Don’t forget to note the measurement.

Step 4: Attach your holdbacks (optional)

This step is optional for those who prefer tied curtains hanging at the center of the window panel. However, if you want them pinned gracefully to the side, then pay attention.

Start by getting yourself some hooks that will hold your tiebacks and curtain. You can opt for decorative holdbacks, which basically look like decorative door knobs that come in all shapes and sizes.

For simple screw hooks, all you need is the piece itself and a powerful tool that will help you drill a hole in the wall. Decorative holdbacks need at least two to three screws, depending on the design. Please attach it to the wall using the measurement you got in step three.

Step 5: Tie the curtain back

Get your curtain tieback and wrap it around the fabric. You can use a typical knot to secure it in place. Adjust the material so that it creates an elegant curve—experiment with loosely tied or tightened knots.

For curtains swayed to the side using a holdback, gather the fabric starting from the middle and gently tug the section to the side. Remember that the top part of your curtain should not move along when you pull the middle section. Tie and secure the curtain in place.

Design Tips

Besides using regular drapery ties that you can get from any store, try to experiment with everyday items, you find in your household. In fact, you can even switch it up with DIY curtain tiebacks using cable ties and decorative materials.

Think outside the box when it comes to decorating your holdbacks. There are clear and plain curtain holdbacks that you can easily customize. Decorate it with some acrylic paint, stickers, or 3D ornaments like floral garlands, bells, and many more.

Don’t have the time to buy a tieback or make your own? That’s okay since you can also tie the curtains with the fabric itself. Keep in mind that this might only work for longer sheer curtains lengths.

Take a bunch of fabric and treat it as a relatively thick piece of rope. Knot the fabric together, and you will have a neatly tied curtain without the use of any curtain tiebacks or holdbacks. You can also experiment with decorative styles of tying the fabric.

Summary

Overall, there are many ways to tie curtains and make them look visually appealing. Find out what works for you, and don’t be afraid of testing the waters.

How to tie curtains

Related Articles

  • How to Decorate Using Only Side Drapes at a Window
  • How to Hang Curtains With Transoms
  • How to Make Several Windows Look Like One in a Sunroom
  • How to Make Your Own Window Scarf Accessories
  • How to Make Swags With Rod Pockets

Curtain panels provide light and privacy control. Use a tieback to stylize a curtain panel and deliver direct light into a room. French doors benefit from top and bottom rod pockets and headings to create an hourglass shape, which is achieved by including a center tieback. A straight curtain panel can be used for this effect, or a customized curtain panel with center contours can accentuate the hourglass shape.

Measure your window opening and determine size and placement of the curtain panel, tieback and flat sash rods needed for installation. Curtain panels should be at least 3-to-1 fullness for opaque fabrics such as cotton sheers. Fullness for translucent fabrics may require up to 6-to-1 fabric fullness to maximize light control. Add 3 inches to the top and bottom of the overall glass measurement and adjust for obstructions, such as trim molding, that may interfere with the rod bracket placement. Add a layer of crinoline lining to maintain its shape.

Insert the sash rods through the top and bottom curtain pockets and attach the installation brackets to the rod ends. Ask someone else hold the top rod in place while you pull down on the bottom rod to mark installation points with a pen through the bracket holes. Allow the fabric to sag slightly between the top and bottom rod to reduce stress on the fabric when the tieback is attached. Use a level to confirm all measurements are square.

Remove the brackets from the top rod and use a cordless drill to install them securely to the wall surface. Insert the fabric-shirred rod into the installed brackets and adjust the top headings and pocket while distributing the curtain panel evenly across the installed rod. Pull down gently on the bottom rod and confirm that the original installation marks are accurate, while ensuring there is a slight sag in the fabric tension between the two rods.

Remove the bottom rod from the brackets. Use a level and tape measure to confirm their alignment with the top brackets, and use a drill to install them to the wall surface. Insert the fabric-shirred bottom rod into the brackets and adjust headings as needed. Attach the tieback at the center of the curtain panel and secure it to the desired tension by adjusting the position of the hook-and-loop tape.

‘Tis the season to pull back the curtains and let in the sun.

  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Related To:

Chic + Secure

These pretty pink drapes are straight from our interior design dreams. Get the look by making your own tiebacks out of white, braided rope and chic gold hardware.

Grab a Glass Knob

Repurpose a glamorous glass doorknob into a sturdy, stylish DIY tieback for even your heaviest drapes. We especially love this approach for formal spaces such as a dining room or home office.

Sweet + Simple Twine

Need a way to pull your curtains back in a pinch? Swipe some of your leftover craft twine to create an inexpensive, yet chic way to let in the sunshine.

Try Tassels

Whether you live in a bohemian bungalow or a traditional townhome, there’s always space for a set of snazzy, DIY tassel tiebacks in your life. Recreate our step-by-step directions for a casual approach, or switch out the wood beads for a metallic gold for a more formal touch.

Mix Styles

Contrast is the name of the game when creating custom curtain tiebacks. This subtle, sleek black chain appears effortlessly cool against the vibrant salmon drapes. Get the same effect at home by using colors and textures in unexpected ways.

Cut the Cord

DIY a set of simple-yet-stylish curtain tiebacks in no time by using soft, brown leather cord and a removable hook. The neutral leather compliments the gauzy, striped curtains and adds to the easy-breezy, bohemian design — perfect for dorm room or apartment dwellers.

Belted + Beautiful

A belt can make or break an outfit and, as it turns out, can make or break a window treatment, too. Repurpose a sleek leather belt to create custom tiebacks for the drapes in your home office or library.

I know what you’re thinking.

“Where did she get those adorable buffalo-check tie-up curtains??” How to tie curtains

How to tie curtains

Just kidding. Maybe you’re not thinking that. But would you believe it if I said that I SEWED THEM MYSELF?!

Yes, me. An amateur seamstress whose projects usually end up in a knotted mess. No joke. It has happened. I am so excited how they turned out (and they don’t actually look like crap!) and love that they add a little farmhouse charm to our kitchen.

I originally saw these curtains at Target, but they were too small to fit our windows. I think they’re 42″x63″.

How to tie curtains

I looked everywhere to find something similar but didn’t have much luck. That’s when the search began for fabric!

Believe it or not, I found my fabric on Amazon. Best price and 2-day shipping. Heck yes.

As you may or may not know, I do most of my projects as fast as I can while my little one is napping. So timewise, I got these done in about 2 naps. 🙂 Really, if you can sew a straight line on a sewing machine, you could do this too!

How to tie curtains

I loosely followed Miss Mustard Seed’s DIY & Ready-Made Tie-Up Shades but modified it a little to fit the design I wanted and size of my windows (46″x46″ – I had no idea my windows were perfectly square. They really don’t look like it!). I wanted these to fit inside of our window on a tension rod, and be slightly bunched, so I ordered 4 yards of fabric (I would be putting these on 2 windows).

Since my windows are 46″x46″, I wanted to have enough extra fabric for hemming and for a little bunching on the rod, so I cut my fabric to 54″x54″. For the tie-ups, I cut 8 strips 4″x54″.

First thing I did was hem the 2 sides and bottom of both of my curtains. I fold the fabric up by about 1/2″ twice, so that the raw edge is tucked inside the fold and pin it in place. Before I sew the hem, I iron along the fold. This makes a huge difference. It makes it easier to sew and just looks better on the finished product.

How to tie curtainsFolded up once 1/2″ Folded up again 1/2″

For the tie-ups, I folded those 4″ strips in half, with the print on the inside. I sewed a straight line all the way down but didn’t sew them closed on the ends. Right now, they are inside-out, so you have to get them right-side out. This was the hardest and most time-consuming part! Because they’re so long, it made it really difficult. If anybody has any tricks, please share!! Once I got them right-side out, I ironed them flat.

For the top pocket, I folded the raw edge down only once (1/2″), then folded it down 3″ to create the pocket. Before I sewed this shut, I placed my tie-ups under the fold (see picture below). I divided the width of my fabric by 1/3 to figure out where to place them. I placed 2 tie-ups on the left-hand side (one on top of the other), then 2 more tie-ups on the right-hand side. Once you’re done, 2 tie-ups would be in the front and 2 would be in the back. Then, sewed a straight line across that would also sew in the tie-ups.

And really, at this point, you’re done! It took a little finagling to get the tie-ups just right, but I think they’re adorable! Not too bad for an amateur. 🙂 Let me know what you think!

How to tie curtains

Related Articles

  • How to Hang a Balloon Curtain
  • How to Install Drapes in a Corner Window
  • How to Hem Polyester Curtains With Fabric Glue
  • How to Decorate Christmas Garland With Ribbon
  • How to Hang Curtains With Thumbtacks

One traditional way to accessorize curtains or formal drapes is to add tiebacks. Tiebacks are decorative fabric strips or cords used to secure open curtains into elegant draped lines. Whatever type of tieback you use, the drapery accessories give the room a clean, polished look as long as all the tie backs in the room are at the same level. The height you choose is ultimately a matter of personal taste, but a few guidelines can help you find the right tieback height to give your curtains pleasing proportions.

Measure 39 inches up from the floor if the curtains are 84 inches long or floor-length. Have a friend hold the curtain panel back at this level, and stand on the other side of the room to see if you like it. If not, have your friend adjust the level higher or lower until you are satisfied. Mark the spot on the wall lightly in pencil.

Measure 12 inches up from the bottom of the window or the curtains if the curtains are 55 inches long. Stand back while a friend pulls the curtain open at this level, and adjust it as necessary. Mark the wall at the desired level for the tieback.

Determine the height of the window when the curtains are any other length, and divide the height by three. Measure the resulting distance up from the bottom of the window, and check whether you like this level for the tie back. For example, if the window is 60 inches tall, divide 60 by three to get 20, and measure 20 inches up from the bottom of the window for the tieback. When the curtain is considerably longer than the window, set the tieback one-third of the way up the curtain rather than the window. Adjust the levels until you are satisfied, and mark the spot on the wall.

Tie a plumb line to the outermost ring or glider on the curtain rod or rail and drop the weight down. When the string touches the curtain, pull the curtain panel in toward the the middle of the window so the string hangs freely. When the weight settles, place a ruler at the mark you made for your desired level, and make a second mark where the ruler meets the plumb line. This is where you should attach the tieback.

Spring is here, and the change of season means deep cleaning, reorganizing and updating. I love to change things up in the spring. It’s so much easier to tackle redecorating projects when your home is fresh and spotless.

One fast and painless way to update a room is to change the curtains or draperies. I recently took one pair of basic drapery panels and used them six different ways in several different rooms.

I chose sheer panels with an embroidered graphic pattern and a rod pocket. These panels are 52 inches wide x 84 inches long, and can be styled to fit almost any space.

1. Stationary Panels

I started in a bedroom that had a painted wood rod with finials and hung the draperies as stationary panels.

With this style, the curtains stay in place; you don’t open or close them.

If privacy and light control are an issue, you can install blinds or a shade as well.

I recommend hanging your curtain rods as close to the ceiling as possible. That way, the ceiling appears to be higher. A little bit of “puddle” at the floor is acceptable.

How to tie curtains

2. Meet in the Middle

If your decorating style leans toward traditional, have the panels meet in the center of the curtain rod and then pull each panel back with a ribbon or decorative cord.

You can release the tie-backs to close the curtains for privacy.

How to tie curtains

Another option for a room with two windows is to pull both panels to one side and hold in place with a tie-back. The second window should be a mirror image of the first.

For example, the left curtain panel should be drawn to the left and the right curtain panel should be drawn to the right.

How to tie curtains

For something totally different that works for a bathroom, powder room or nursery, I hung a single panel on a tension rod and pulled it up to create a mock balloon valance.

To get this look, gently pleat or fold the panel, starting at the hem, then hold the folds in place with a ribbon.

Wrap a ribbon around the pole and tie the two ends together. Arrange the curtain until you get a gentle curve in the middle.

The length of the valance can be as long or short as you want. Cut the ribbon accordingly. I chose to match the ribbon to the fabric, but a contrasting color could give the window a totally different look.

How to tie curtains

5. Add Clip Rings

A rod pocket curtain is very versatile. While it can be hung on its own, I added curtain clip rings here for a more relaxed look.

This casual style is perfect in a living room, dining room and bedroom. The rings simply clip onto the top of the drapery and slide smoothly on the rod for easy opening and closing.

If the curtain rod is too high, use a drapery baton or wand. A baton keeps you from pulling on the panels, so it protects them from wear and tear.

How to tie curtains

6. Add a Contrasting Color

Finally, I paired the off-white panels with darker drapes. Using more than one color and texture adds contrast and interest.

Layered curtains work well in a dining room or living room when you want to control the light for added atmosphere.

How to tie curtains

The best part of this DIY decorating project is that it requires no sewing, so anyone can design their own customized curtain style. When you are tired of the old look, rearrange your curtains into something entirely new.

Merri Cvetan is an interior designer in Wisconsin and an expert on home decor, including window treatments, drapes and curtains. Merri writes tips on interior design for The Home Depot. To research a wide selection of draperies and curtains, you can visit Home Depot’s website.

The EASIEST DIY Tie Up Curtain Tutorial EVER!

January 30, 2018

No sewing machine? No problem. This is the easiest tutorial for DIY, no sew, tie-up curtains. For this tutorial all you need are 9 very basic supplies. Number 9 being the MOST important. Upfront, these curtains are INSIDE mount. That means you will mount them INSIDE your window frame. Okay, just wanted to make sure you knew that before getting started.

  1. Fabric
  2. Stitch Witchery (Hobby Lobby) – It’s in the sewing/fabric area.
  3. Iron
  4. Ironing board
  5. Tension rods (Hobby Lobby) – In the fabric, curtain rod area.
  6. Ribbon – I recommend a ribbon that has the pattern on the front and the back of the ribbon so your bows look nice.
  7. Ruler
  8. Pencil
  9. Your DIY attitude!
  • Measure the width of your window. Add 4 inches. Write this number down.
  • Determine the length of your curtain(s). Add 4 inches. Write this number down.
  • Put on pants.
  • Buy the amount of fabric you need. Maybe purchase a little extra if you’re like me and always make mistakes.
  • Buy any of the supplies listed above that you may not already own.
  • Use a coupon. Seriously, do not, I repeat, DO NOT go to the counter at Joanns’, Michaels or Hobby Lobby without first getting on your smart phone and tracking down a 40% off coupon.

Step 1

Pour yourself a glass of wine and tell Alexa to play “Tracy Chapman Radio”

Step 2

To make one curtain panel:

  • Cut off the selvage part of your fabric. That’s the fringy/unfinished part Cut off the selvage
  • Cut your fabric the width of your window +4″ and the desired length of your curtain +4″ I made two rectangles because I made two curtains.
  • Iron fabric front and back
  • Place your fabric wrong side up
  • On each side of your curtains mark 1″ from the edge and 2″ from the edge with a pencil
  • Do your sides first, then top and bottom.
    • Fold edge over 1″ and press with iron
    • Then fold over another 1″ and press with iron.
    • Place your stitch witchery in between your fabric and your second fold, press and seal.

Folded the edge 1″ over and pressed with iron. Then fold the edge over again and press again. Unfolded fabric to show I made two seams and pressed twice.

  • Once you have folded all your edges over 2x and sealed all edges with stitch witchery, run your tension rod through the top inside fold that has not been pressed and stabilized with the stitch witchery. (No pic, sorry).
  • Hang your curtain in the window
  • Cut your ribbon the length you like and tie bows at the bottom
  • To help your curtain lay the way you like do a few accordion folds at the bottom and mess with it until it hangs the way you like.

DIY Tie Up Curtains DIY Tie Up Curtains